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#1 Old 06-08-2008, 03:34 AM
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Exclamation Ran over a nail flat tire

Hey guys I ran over a nail yesterday found out this morning and went to go patch it. Usually how reliable are patched tires? Should I look into getting new tires? Only one tire was patched.

Last edited by lamson; 06-08-2008 at 03:36 AM.
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#2 Old 06-08-2008, 08:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lamson View Post
Hey guys I ran over a nail yesterday found out this morning and went to go patch it. Usually how reliable are patched tires? Should I look into getting new tires? Only one tire was patched.
if it was just a puncture through the tread, you should be fine. Simply check a few times if the air pressure holds up...

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#3 Old 06-08-2008, 04:54 PM
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As long as the nail isn't in the sidewall, I would fully trust the patch. No need for panic!

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#4 Old 06-08-2008, 04:57 PM
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Thats a big relief, thanks guys. The nail was definitely in the thread dead center.
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#5 Old 06-08-2008, 06:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lamson View Post
Thats a big relief, thanks guys. The nail was definitely in the thread dead center.
It's probably in the tread, not the thread. A patch is nearly as good a a patch plug. When properly performed it will last the life of the tire and not hurt anything.


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#6 Old 06-08-2008, 07:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRD VVTi View Post
It's probably in the tread, not the thread. A patch is nearly as good a a patch plug.
A typo correction followed immediately by a typo. The irony is rich.

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As long as the nail isn't in the sidewall, I would fully trust the patch. No need for panic!
Yeah, I'm probably rolling around on a half dozen myself. They were doing some construction across the street a while back, and I was picking up nails like it was my job. You'll be alright.

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#7 Old 06-08-2008, 09:58 PM
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i have a nail in the tread of my rear pass. tire. It has been in there for at least a few weeks now and i have not lost any tire pressure. Is i possible it could not have punctured and is just stuck in the thread? i wonder if i should try and pry it out but im worried that if it did puncture, i would end up with a flat..

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#8 Old 06-08-2008, 10:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSo0h0o View Post
i have a nail in the tread of my rear pass. tire. It has been in there for at least a few weeks now and i have not lost any tire pressure. Is i possible it could not have punctured and is just stuck in the thread? i wonder if i should try and pry it out but im worried that if it did puncture, i would end up with a flat..
I'd recommend pulling it out, but having a patch kit handy to go ahead and plug it. Sometimes you can take a nail in the tire without air seeping past, but eventually you'll have a leak (assuming the nail is long enough and not just wedged in the tread). Might as well deal with it when you're prepared rather than get stuck when you have someplace to be.

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#9 Old 06-09-2008, 12:02 AM
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If the patch is applied properly, you should not have any problems with the tire. I have a patch in one of my tires for over a year and some 10000 miles and the tire is still good.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrSo0h0o View Post
i have a nail in the tread of my rear pass. tire. It has been in there for at least a few weeks now and i have not lost any tire pressure. Is i possible it could not have punctured and is just stuck in the thread? i wonder if i should try and pry it out but im worried that if it did puncture, i would end up with a flat..
I recommend you take that thing out when you get the chance. The nail may eventually work its way through and you will lose air.


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#10 Old 06-09-2008, 12:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Qslim View Post
A typo correction followed immediately by a typo. The irony is rich.


I'd recommend pulling it out, but having a patch kit handy to go ahead and plug it. Sometimes you can take a nail in the tire without air seeping past, but eventually you'll have a leak (assuming the nail is long enough and not just wedged in the tread). Might as well deal with it when you're prepared rather than get stuck when you have someplace to be.
A typo and using a word incorrectly are not the same things. Your post makes the irony even more rich.

Plugging a tire actually causes more damage to the tire and should not be done. Tire manufacturers do not recommend the use of plugs.


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#11 Old 06-09-2008, 12:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TRD VVTi View Post
A typo and using a word incorrectly are not the same things. Your post makes the irony even more rich.

Plugging a tire actually causes more damage to the tire and should not be done. Tire manufacturers do not recommend the use of plugs.
Yeah, using a patch kit is best, though I must say I never put a rope plug in one of my tires and ever had it leak again. But, those were cheap econo tires that never saw speeds north of 60, anyhow. Any tire with a moderate speed rating should have a patch installed per the instructions.

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#12 Old 06-09-2008, 10:45 AM
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Gen6

iv had a patched tire for about 3 months now? not sure about the time period, but i got the tire pactched at 3000 miles. i currently have 7500 miles which included two 700 mile trips and five 100 mile trips and the normal home to work drive...

no problems yet... like one of the users said above, keep an eye on the tire pressure light on the dashboard, and you should not have a problem.

Last edited by coolbeans; 06-09-2008 at 10:49 AM.
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#13 Old 06-09-2008, 11:27 AM
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i have plugged or patched hundreds of tires at work. The repair when properly done is permanent and pretty much becomes part of the tire.
For a simple nail hole there is usually no reason to go to all the trouble and expense of removing the tire, patching, reinstalling and rebalancing. You can buy a tire plug kit at pep boys for less than $10 and fix most holes without even jacking up the car. I have done it many times.
Find the hole, mark it, park the car so you can reach the hole. If its a front tire, it is usually a breeze, just turn the steering wheel and move the car so the hole is where you want it. If its the rear, you'll be crawling on the ground but to me its no big deal as i've done it soooo many time...
Now you use your reamer tool with the kit to work the reamer in and out of the holef or a minute or two to enlarge the hole and smooth the cord burrs as much as you can. Some plugs require glue, some dont, i always use the glue as it acts as a lubricant for installation. Now you put your plug on your slotted tool, doubled in half as the instructions will show you, and shove it in the hole. Twist handle of tool. Pul tool out. Cut off excess with dykes. Done.
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#14 Old 06-09-2008, 11:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marc780 View Post
i have plugged or patched hundreds of tires at work. The repair when properly done is permanent and pretty much becomes part of the tire.
For a simple nail hole there is usually no reason to go to all the trouble and expense of removing the tire, patching, reinstalling and rebalancing. You can buy a tire plug kit at pep boys for less than $10 and fix most holes without even jacking up the car. I have done it many times.
Find the hole, mark it, park the car so you can reach the hole. If its a front tire, it is usually a breeze, just turn the steering wheel and move the car so the hole is where you want it. If its the rear, you'll be crawling on the ground but to me its no big deal as i've done it soooo many time...
Now you use your reamer tool with the kit to work the reamer in and out of the holef or a minute or two to enlarge the hole and smooth the cord burrs as much as you can. Some plugs require glue, some dont, i always use the glue as it acts as a lubricant for installation. Now you put your plug on your slotted tool, doubled in half as the instructions will show you, and shove it in the hole. Twist handle of tool. Pul tool out. Cut off excess with dykes. Done.
You always state that what you do is sound. It's usually not. I don't know why you post advice at all because it's clear that you don't actually know what you're talking about.

Tires should always be dismounted when they're repaired to check for any other damage to the tire. Sometimes a nail will actually rub other spots inside the tire causing damage to the liner, cords, etc. Many times if there is a leak the tire has been run low and the inside of the tire needs to be inspected for internal damage also.

Do everyone a favor and quit posting your advice.

Tire plugs are not a recommended permanent tire repair according to ALL tire manufacturers.

Here are some quotes for you:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tire Warehouse
Any repair attempted without removing the tire from the wheel is improper.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tire Warehouse
Simply plugging a tire from the outside without removing the tire from the wheel is improper. (If a tire is punctured while off-roading far away from civilization and a spare tire isn't available, a plug may serve as a temporary low speed solution that must be replaced with a proper repair as soon as possible upon returning to the road.)
Here's the link for your education: http://www.tirewarehouseonline.com/Tirerepair.html

Check with tire manufacturers and they will tell you the same thing.

Here, check these links out too:

http://www.coopertire.com/html/pdf/S...ulletin108.pdf

http://www.conti-online.com/generato..._repair_en.pdf

http://www.techtirerepairs.com/why.htm


I'll add this to your list of tecnical advice blunders.

Here are some more of marc780's technical advice blunders:

1) marc 780 states that Toyota requires a specific P/S fluid and not Dexron - Toyota has recommended Dexron and Dexron II for decades. Check the online manual.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t217403.html

2) Here marc780 states that moving the TPS around until the car idles correctly is acceptable. You cite that because you do it that it's fine. Actually, you need a scan tool or voltmeter to set it within specs. Check the online manual for verification.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=217414

3) Now marc780 states that impact wrenches are just as good as torque wrenches for installing wheels and not causing any problems. Again, you cite that because you do it that it's proper. That's not true. You can search ANYWHERE for supporting facts that you are incorrect.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/sh...20#post2041920

4) marc780 also recommends that someone with a faulty accelerator pedal sensor replace the TPS instead. That will do nothing. The accelerator pedal sensor relays it's information to the ECM. The ECM decides what exactly the driver is trying to accomplish and signals the throttle body what to do. The TPS that's integrated into the throttle body tells the ECM what position the TB is at.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t218561.html

5) Here marc780 suggests that an I4 2AZ-FE (with a timing chain) has a timing belt and cover by saying
Quote:
remove the timing belt cover and run the engine and listen for the noise. Be very carefull but put your hand or an object on the timing belt pulley to affect its operation - (use care not to get that thing tangled inthe engine!) and listen.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/sh...36#post2023636

6) Here marc780 states that this person should replace the timing belt, waterpump, and idlers for no reason. The car comes with timing chain and the water pump is external.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=233743

7) In this thread he can't even recognize a radial pull on his OWN CAR!

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/sh...63#post2194663

8) Here is a thread that he started because he couldn't even figure out that his power steering belt just needed to be readjusted because it stretched slightly. Belts needing to be adjusted is COMMON knowledge after a new belt is run. He can't even figure that out on his own.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t235139.html

9) Here is his contribution by adding a "TECH" article to the forum. He suggests smashing battery cable ends with hammer or smashing a penny with a hammer to make a battery cable "shim". His "TECH" write up also suggests starting a stored vehicle every two weeks and letting it idle to charge the battery...

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t220898.html

10) In this thread he recommends jamming a screwdriver into the throttle body and throttle blade. This can easily damage the throttle body itself, the throttle blade, and any coatings by scratching it.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t157470.html

11) Here marc780 couldn't even figure out why his car vibrated when the brakes were applied. He doesn't even understand that you can't see the rotor warpage with the naked eye. He also suggests that he thinks an alignment problem could cause his braking vibration. Again, this just shows he doesn't even grasp the basic principles!

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t191294.html

12) Apparently, marc780 has a learning disability because after being told over and over that the 2AZ-FE has a timing chain instead of a belt he STILL gives advice about 2AZ-FE's and timing belts or covers:

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t238748.html

13) Here is were marc780 tells someone to "solder" a PLASTIC radiator tank as the only good repair. Of course, solder doesn't adhere to plastic and would be completely worthless just like most of his advice.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t238753.html

14) marc780 strikes again! This is a thread where he tells someone to dilute coolant that comes premixed (Toyota Super Long Life). As usual, he doesn't have a clue what he's talking about but passes along inaccurate information anyways.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?p=2244220&posted=1#post2244220

15) marc780 never gives up. Here he states that an IAC motor is basically a engine temperature regulated choke and that it has vanes in it. He also suggests to check a cold start injector on a '99 Solara.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t240257.html

16) marc780 continues to pass myth along as facts. Here he states that the Toyota Camry needs 5,000 miles to break in even after it's posted that Toyota states that's not the case at all. He also states that synthetic oils will keep an engine from breaking in, even though GM, Porsche, Mercedes, Chrysler, BMW, Ferrari, etc. use synthetic oils as factory fill.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?p=2260641&posted=1#post2260641

17) In this thread, marc780 thinks that if the EGR valve is a bad the vehicle has to have a "bad" idle also. Of course that isn't the case, but he doesn't know what he's talking about anyway...

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t244228.html

18) Here's a thread where marc780 claims to be licensed in A/C but doesn't even understand the refridgerant he's "licensed" to handle...

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?t=246864

19) marc780 recommends abandoning an electrical circuit instead of first checking the basics. This is because he doesn't know what he's talking about, as usual (surprise)

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/showthread.php?p=2313294&posted=1#post2313294

20) marc780 says that belt dressing will cause a belt to break in a week or two (but he can't even figure out his own belt problems)...

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t251539.html

21) In this thread marc780 states that a tire plug is a permanent repair that becomes part of the tire. That's not true and plugging a tire can be very dangerous.

http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t252878.html

Listening to marc780's advice could cause serious damage to your car, cause a waste of time and/or money, or even be extremely dangerous!


Also note that marc780 is a troll that has at least one other username which is TRD EarBanger.


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#15 Old 06-09-2008, 01:50 PM
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Quote:
Tires should always be dismounted when they're repaired to check for any other damage to the tire. Sometimes a nail will actually rub other spots inside the tire causing damage to the liner, cords, etc. Many times if there is a leak the tire has been run low and the inside of the tire needs to be inspected for internal damage also.

Do everyone a favor and quit posting your advice.
TRD, the only thing you're good at is insulting people. Half the time you don't even know WTF you are talking about, including plugging tires - even when i tell you i've spent years doing it and observing the results in real life. And i can tell when a tires been driven flat without dismounting it, usually there is no more visible evidence INSIDE the tire than out.

MORON, i have repaired hundreds of tires with plugs and almost no comebacks. Including many of my own with no problems whatsoever.
But you go ahead and spend $25 to repair a worn tire, since you know everything about cars there is to know.

Last edited by marc780; 06-09-2008 at 01:52 PM.
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