How difficult to replace the tank fuel filler neck pipe - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car and Truck Forums
7th Generation (1993-1997) Specific discussion of the 7th generation

 
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#1 Old 12-29-2010, 11:14 AM
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How difficult to replace the tank fuel filler neck pipe

I appear to have a fuel leak, more like a minor weeping then a leak, near the rear of the car, I've yet to get it up in the air to verify from where it is coming but from looking underneath it appears to be the fuel filler neck pipe. Any though on the difficulty of such a repair? Also any though on it been the tank?
I do live in New England, so this car has had 13 years of winter salt tossed on it, but I would like it to last a few more.

Last edited by PhatRoyale; 07-09-2011 at 10:06 AM.
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#2 Old 12-29-2010, 02:02 PM
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I feel your pain. It is likely that there is a leak on both the filler neck and the tank.
My filler neck rusted through at several spots. The bends would just crack wide open. A year or two after that, the breather pipe rusted through right were it goes out of the tank. The tank has a short pipe, about 4 inches long, going out of it. This pipe is attached to a section of a rubber hose which is then attached to the breather pipe that goes along the filler neck.

Replacement of the filler neck pipe is not too bad. The locking mechanism for the lid where the cap is, is a bit tricky to put back on. Due to lack of space and difficult access. Other than that, there are just the usual problems associated with taking apart stuff that has been salted like french fries.
Splash guards in the wheel arches need to come off, rusty screws. Some of these go into plastic clips so not ALL of them will cause trouble. Then the rubber hoses that attach the filler neck to the tank are quite a bit stuck. Be careful and patient while disconnecting them. If in really bad shape, might as well replace them while you are at it. Disconnecting them at the tank is more risky though, if you damage the pipes on the tank, the tank will have to be replaced and that is far more difficult than the filler neck.

In general, pretty much everything you touch during that job will be stuck and/or rusted.
I did it with the car on jack-stands and crawling under it. Lifting the car up properly would certainly make it easier but is not a must.
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#3 Old 12-29-2010, 08:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phoenix42 View Post
I appear to have a fuel leak, more like a minor weeping then a leak, near the rear of the car, I've yet to get it up in the air to verify from where it is coming but from looking underneath it appears to be the fuel filler neck pipe. Any though on the difficulty of such a repair? Also any though on it been the tank?
I do live in New England, so this car has had 13 years of winter salt tossed on it, but I would like it to last a few more.
What year is the car?
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#4 Old 12-29-2010, 09:05 PM
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It is a 1997 with 221k on it.
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#5 Old 12-29-2010, 09:13 PM
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get the rubber filler tube as well as the neck, cut the rubber and replace it with the new tube....you'll save alot of time there.
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#6 Old 07-09-2011, 09:28 AM
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i have the same issue, has an inch crack in the gas tank so got under there and used tank repair putty, then as i filled it the next day i got a leak in the filler neck, its pretty rusted im using this car as a work vehicle i plan on having it for like another year 2 at the most, is it really nessesary to replace the neck? its a drip not a stream and i figure if the gas can get in the tank your good its when all the gas is leaking from the neck is the problem, what you guys think?
i dont wanna spend a crap load on repairs moneys tight as it is
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#7 Old 07-09-2011, 06:06 PM
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I had this problem in 2006ish. The tank is highly pressurized. I wasted $30 bucks on every fuel tank repair kit, metal patch job, JB weld putty, anything autozone sold I tried. And eventually it would start leaking again. I ended up getting a used gas tank for $40 bucks at a local junkyard.

I don't remember the exact steps but it wasn't too bad. Take the rear seat off, unclip and remove the fuel pump. Lift the rear of the car and undo the straps and I believe there are a few lines or maybe one that attaches to the tank. The main inconvenience was getting dirty rolling on the ground. I cracked my rear tank by jumping snowbanks at a walmart parking lot.

1995 rolla dx 5spd. A bajillion miles on the original engine and tranny.
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#8 Old 07-10-2011, 08:54 PM
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Its extremely difficult to get a semi permanent repair to rusted out parts. Whatever repair you make falls off as the rust dissloves the metal next to it.

making the repairs is semi difficult because everything is a rusted mess.

If you do replace the neck make sure the short rubber hoses you replace as well are for FUEL. Rad hoses of the same size will dissolve after a while. I have replaced this sort of tube in the past and NAPA was the only one who didnt give me a dumb look when I asked for large size fuel hose.

-SP
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#9 Old 08-18-2011, 11:36 PM
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Exclamation Don't repair over rust until you repair the rust.

Why waste time and money? If you're convinced you want to repair where you have rust do 2 things.

1) Is the structural integrity already gone?
a) yes. Replace it. Forget about repairing it.
b) no. Go to 2

2) The agricultural industry has been dealing with rust for more than a hundred years eh? So find a converter. They're all over the place and I don't mean at Home Depot. Find something sold at tractor and farm stores. Online or land-line. The good converters really work. They do convert the rust and block its continuance, and they are paint ready. I've never not painted after converting tho some of the products will say that's not always necessary.

Its a cheap way of getting some integrity back to the part, before putting it back together. And don't forget to use a corrosion protectant around the parts. Unless they get hot; then it will just melt and run off.
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#10 Old 08-19-2011, 02:05 AM
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So there is no misunderstanding, rust converters do not convert the rust back into iron or return any strength the metal lost to corrosion in the first place.
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#11 Old 08-19-2011, 05:44 AM
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that's right. you can't return strength to missing "lost' metal.

However. They do convert the rust to various forms of zinc (other metals?). By doing so they can dramatically reduce the recurrence of rust, and they add a layer of new metal (albeit weaker) that can and is readily primed with additional protection.

The idea is not to return the integrity of the original, but transform a weakening part into a (weaker than original) neutralized part. "inert".

Installing a rubber fuel hose over rusted tube end would fail my safety inspection. A converted tube end would pass; assuming the 1st question in the original post.

I'm new here and was surprised that the word safety didn't appear in this thread: wait that can't be right! The thread is about fuel systems. Gotta reread it after I post this.
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#12 Old 08-19-2011, 12:07 PM
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I know what you meant, I just thought that this could be misconstrued by someone else as rust converters being able to reverse the damage caused by the corrosion process.

I'm new here too, BTW, but not new to cars. Many members seem to be, though, and that's the only reason I said anything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wmartin View Post
Its a cheap way of getting some integrity back to the part, before putting it back together.
Also, the rust treatments I'm familar with don't involve zinc. Rust is iron(III) oxide (Fe2O3) and cannot be converted "into" a zinc-only (or any other metal) compound without somehow displacing the iron(which is possible I suppose; zinc is higher on the activity series(more reactive) than iron after all). There are compounds containing both zinc and iron coupled with oxygen, but they are not likely to form in the situations that rust converters are typically used. Common phosphoric acid-based converters like naval jelly add phosphorous to the iron oxide molecule to make ferric phosphate which is not reactive with oxygen and thus forms a weak protective coating. Converters with tannic acid convert the iron oxide into ferric tannate. If you're familiar with passivation, that's what rust converters do; they create a stable and unreactive oxide layer that actually protects the underlying metal from more oxidation, unlike rust.

I doubt anyone was looking for a chem lesson, but hey, the more you know...

Last edited by Dirty Dude; 08-19-2011 at 12:10 PM.
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#13 Old 08-25-2011, 12:43 PM
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wow, I guess I was lucky, mine was getting pretty rusted, I jumped to the local J/Y and found one that looked brand new.... got it for $15... replaced all clamps with new.... I would say replacing the pipe is pretty easy, took me about 15-20 min....
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