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Old 01-07-2012, 07:02 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Objective: FIX OIL CONSUMPTION PROBLEM

COMPLETED: '98 Prizm, '99 Prizm, '00 Prizm, '01 Corolla (Alec1), '01 Celica GT (01 Celica Gt), '00 Celica GT-S 2ZZ-GE (01 Celica Gt), '01 Saturn SL2, '00 Corolla (mattqb17).
Coming soon???: 2000 Prizm & 2001 Prizm


YOUTUBE VIDEO based on this write up, done by "Phoenix and Dad"

Reasons not to wait:
1: This is a 1 time fix. Once fixed (per this writeup) the problem will not come back.
2: Oil is not cheap.
3: If you run it low on oil you risk ruining the engine.
4: If you let it go long enough you WILL:
a. Burn an exhaust valve (due to carbon build up)
b: Ruin the catalitic converter (due to carbon build up)
c: Ruin 1 or both O2 sensors (due to carbon build up)

These things (a, b & c) will start happening at the qt. every 100-150 miles consumption rate when you keep driving it for 16,000 miles if you get what i'm saying.


Part 1: Parts & special tools needed.

You will need a good clean work place and you should allow yourself plenty of time. Take your time and do it right once. It's much faster that way. I highly recommend the exact parts listed below.

Parts:

Piston ring set: DNJ Engine Components #PR946 $40.79

Head Gasket Set: Fel-Pro #HS26158PT $103.89 for '98 & '99 OR #HS26158PT1 for '00+

Head Bolt Set: Fel-Pro #ES710661 $55.79 (head bolts are “torque to yield” and must be replaced)

Above parts purchased from Rockauto.com for $207.78 shipped (with 5% discount code)

If there is any chance the engine was run low on oil then I would recomend ordering new bearings just in case.
Bearing set: DNJ (standard size) #RB946 $24.79 (rockauto.com)

Tube of high temp RTV $5~

5qt conventional 5w30 oil & filter $18~

Coolant $12~

Several (4 or 5) cans of brake parts cleaner $2.50 each

A roll of “shop towels” $3

Tools:


#1 Cylinder hone. I can’t remember when or where I got this one. It was a cheap one.

#2 Gearwrench ratcheting external torx wrench (E6 & E8), this it technically not the right size but they don't make one like this that is the right size and you are just removing a stud so it is not an issue. You can do it without this but it’s easier with.
http://www.amazon.com/Gear-Wrench-9220-Torx-Ratcheting/dp/B000HBC79E http://www.amazon.com/Gear-Wrench-9220-Torx-Ratcheting/dp/B000HBC79E


#3 E5 drive socket, you can do it without this but it’s easier with.
http://www.amazon.com/Lisle-Tools-Creepers-26770-Socket/dp/B0002JMJD0 http://www.amazon.com/Lisle-Tools-Creepers-26770-Socket/dp/B0002JMJD0


#4 Craftsman 3/8 drive torque wrench (25-250inlb.)

#5 Craftsman 1/2 drive torque wrench (20-150ftlb.)

#6 OTC 4572 valve spring compressor:
Amazon Amazon


#7 Small piece of 3” PVC pipe cut down one side

#8 Gotta have tunes.

#9 (not pictures)
10MM bi-hexagon bit 10MM bi-hexagon bit
. I have used an M12 triple square bit and not had an issue, you could also probably get away with a 10MM hex bit, only the 10MM bi-hex is the correct one though. A standard (short) length bit will not work for this (see pics below), it must be several inches long to reach through the head and get to the bolt. (link and info thanks to http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/149677-bustedstuff104.html)

#10 (not pictured) feeler gauge.

#11 A decent selection of standard tools will be needed which I have not individually listed.

#12 A service manual. Factory, Haynes or Chilton.


Part 2: Removing the head.

I won’t be covering every single step. I’m going to try and highlight some of the key things that are maybe less obvious. I’m trying to avoid writing a book.

1: From above, remove the upstream O2 sensor from the exhaust (skip this step on Celicas). It does not need to be unplugged. This is removed to gain access to the exhaust manifold bolt. From below the car, remove exhaust manifold bolts (2) and mounting bolt (1) between engine and manifold. I usually get this bolt with a 24" extension and a swivel socket from the passanger side wheel well. You are done under the car for the rest of part 2.



2: Disconnect and pull the cruise control and plug wires over the driver side of engine bay. Disconnect the PCV valve and breather tube from the valve cover.


3: Remove the valve cover. Unbolt the fuel rail and intake manifold from the head, and the one additional bolt show in pic below. Swing fuel rail over to the driver side of engine bay. Intake can be pulled out enough to be removed from the studs.


4: Remove the cam sprockets (14mm). If it's a VVT engine just remove the exhaust cam srocket. There is no need to worry about timing or cam & engine position at this point. Have a clean open space to lay everything out on EXACTLY as it can off the engine. It is important to put each piece in the exact same location it came from.


5: Remove timing cover bolts and studs. There are 2 studs pictured below. I think the left stud (on the belt tensioner) is actually E7 but I didn't have E7 and E8 worked just fine. The stud towards the front of the car is E5. There are 4 more 10mm bolts 3 on the outside and one on the inside.



I can’t lie, I had lots of help


6: Remove everything from rear (driver side) of the head. Here is a good after the fact pic:


7: Pull the cams (10mm & 12mm). Again, set them out exactly as they were placed on the head. They are marked but it’s very simple to just lay them all out in order.


8: Remove head bolts (M12 triple square). Do not use an impact to removed any bolt that is bolted in to aluminum.


9: Pull head and exhaust manifold!

Part 3: Removing pistons, honing re-ringing and reinstalling pistons.

1: Remove the oil pan. I have yet to remove the brace that runs under the pan for this. It would make it easier but it looks like a pain to take out.


The pan is sealed on with RTV. There is a nice spot to pry against towards the back of the engine by the flex plate. And you will need to pry!


Here is a Celica shot. There is a little more room between the K member and engine in the Celica:


2: At this point you will need to rotate the engine in to position. It can either be with pistons 1 and 4 all the way down or with 2 and 3 all the way down. You will need to lift the timing chain up until it’s tight so that it doesn’t bind as you rotate the engine. With the head off there should be almost no resistance to turning the engine over. If there is, don't force it, double check the timing chain.

3: Remove connecting rod caps (12pt 10mm). I only remove 1 piston at a time so that nothing gets mixed up. Pull cap, then using a drive socket extension inserted in to one of the bolt holes, push rod and piston straight up and out of cylinder. Be careful! You don't want to damage the crank / rod bearing surfaces or the cylinder walls. The drive socket extension really does work very well.



Here is what a well cared for Toyota rod bearing looks like @ 265K miles. No reason the check for tolerance on these:



Here is what the cylinder looks like. You can still see the cross hatches:


4: Hone the cylinder. You will want to put a rag in the bottom to catch ANYTHING that may fall down on to the crank bearing surface. Generously spray some WD-40 in the cylinder and on the hone. Push and pull the hone up and down as you go to achieve nice cross hatches. Remember: this is to de-glaze the cylinder wall, not bore it out. 20 seconds or so per cylinder should be enough. The honing is necessary for the new rings to seat properly.


What it should look like:


5: Piston update, cleanup and re-ring. After removing the rings here is what you will find. The oil drain holes are all completely clogged. The is not as bad as my other Prizm because the rings themselves are not completely seized in the groves. In this case I was burning about a qt. every 400-600 miles. My other Prizm, qt. every 100 miles.


I drilled clean the 4 original holes and added 2 more on each piston. I don’t know exactly what the drill bit size was. It was just the biggest one I had around that was smaller than the oil ring grove. It was slightly larger than factory.



Take one of the original compression rings and cut it in half. Use it to scrap clean all the ring groves on the piston.


I used an angle die grinder with a very nonaggressive stripping disc to clean off the piston surface. Then CLEAN, CLEAN, CLEAN everything!!! Compressed air and brake parts cleaner are your best friends! You do not want any metal shavings from the drilling going back in to the engine!


Install new rings. The new rings come in marked bags. Do not remove them from the bags until you are installing them on the piston. If there is writing/markings on the rings install them with the writing facing the top of the piston, more on this can be seen on page 21 of this writeup, thanks doctorbee!). #1 compression ring goes on the top grove, then #2 compression, then #3 oil ring assemblies. Rotate the rings so that the gaps alternate and so that the gaps are located on the wrist pin sides of the pistons.



6: Wipe clean the cylinder walls, oil the rings and piston assembly generously and reinstall the piston using the PVC pipe as a ring compressor. Use the bottom of a hammer handle to LIGHTLY tap the piston in to place. If it is not going verify the rings are compressed all the way.


CAREFULLY push piston all the way down while aligning connecting rod with crankshaft. *You don't want to damage the crank / rod bearing surfaces or the cylinder walls*. You may need the help of a friend since you can’t really be above and below the engine at the same time. I have had a pretty easy time rotating the crank to the perfect position that the rods naturally will go down to. Oil and reinstall rod caps. Torque bolts to 15ftlb (180inlb on my wrench), then turn an additional 90*.
Repeat step 2-5 for all pistons and cylinders. The #4 cylinder is a pain with the brace running under the engine.

7: Clean oil pan. Mine was pretty good but this is the time to clean out any sludge in the bottom of the pan. I used brake parts cleaner and rags. Scrap off gasket RTV from both the pan and the engine block, wipe clean with rag and brake parts cleaner. Apply bead of RTV to oil pan and reinstall pan.


MORE TO COME..........
__________________
'00 Camry 2.2 auto. 205K

RIP '98 Prizm 4spd 310K hit deer 12/2/13
Oil consumption fixed @ 265K


Last edited by Bennie; 03-28-2014 at 01:44 PM.
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Old 01-11-2012, 10:40 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Part 4: Head disassembly, cleanup and valve seal replacement.

1: Remove the exhaust manifold from the head. I like to clean a nice space off the workbench to do the rest of the head work.

2: Using a magnet, remove the bucket style lifters from each valve and place them in order on the workbench. You can see how I have everything in order that has been removed.


3: Using the valve spring compressor, compress each valve and remove the valve keepers with a magnet and a screwdriver. The rotor is just a counter weight. 




4: Remove all the valve seals. I mostly used a needle nose pliers but a flathead screwdriver can be used on some of them. They can be a pain. Be very careful not do damage the inside of the valve guide while you are doing this.
Here is the disassembled head. Clean up the head as much as needed.


5: Install new valve seals. I used a 10mm nut driver and a rubber mallet to install them.




6: I used a bench grinder with a wire brush to clean all the carbon buildup off the valves. Some of the buildup really didn’t want to come off but in the end everything cleaned up nice.


7: I dip the valve tip in oil before installing them back in to the head. Install springs retainer and keepers. It will likely take lots of patients to get the keepers back in. After installing them I use a small brass pipe and a rubber mallet to tap on the top of the valve to make sure everything seated correctly.




8: Install lifters using lots of oil. If you look under them you will see there is a number engraved. That is important if any of the valves are out of “adjustment”. More on that later.


9: Check valve clearance: Install the cams. Torque #1 journal to 17ftlb., torque all others to 120inlb. You can rotate the cams as needed with a cresent wrench on the center of the cam. With the cam lobs up, use a feeler gauge to check for 0.006-0.010in on the intake valves & 0.010-0.014in on the exhaust valves. If everything is in spec remove the cams.
It may seem redundant to install the cams just to check for clearance at this point but it is by far the easiest point to check and adjust if needed. The clearance wears tighter as time goes one so if anything I like to see tolerance on the high end.


Cleaned and fully assembled head:


Part 5: Installing the head & cams, timing

1: Torque to yield head bolts, gasket surface prep: TTY bolts are designed to stretch and are a one time use bolt. Let’s face it, back in the 80’s and 90’s head gaskets were a pretty normal thing to go out. That’s not the case anymore. They seem to have this stuff figured out pretty good so I’m not messing around with it. I’ve heard that you should not even use an abrasive disc on the head gasket surfaces so I don’t. I hit them up with some brake parts cleaner and that’s about it. And I always replace the bolts because that’s what’s called for!
Set the head gasket in place & put a bead of RTV on the timing cover & ***LEAVE THE TIMING CHAIN TENSIONER INSTALLED***. It will help keep one of the chain guide out of the way of the head. RTV exhaust doughnut on to exhaust manifold (just enough to hold it in place).



2: Turn engine to TDC. Here it a pic of the harmonic balancer and the timing mark:


3: Install the head. Take your time, make sure everything is lining up right and don’t force anything. Double check the timing chain guide ( on the firewall side of the engine). Make sure you can move it. If needed remove the tensioner so you can get it to seat right. You will need Follow a manual for torque specs and tightening sequence of head bolts. Install timing cover bolts and studs. It’s a pain getting the bolt back in on the inside. I used a screwdriver to put some tension on it and a ratcheting box wrench to tighten it. I don’t know if any other tool could get in there to tighten it.


4: Install the cams in the position shown in the pic below (this is extremely important). Torque #1 journal to 17ftlb., torque all others to 120inlb.

5: Remove the timing chain tensioner. This is where things get a little tricky. You have to align the timing chain on the cam sprockets, then install the cam sprockets.
You will need to install the chain on the intake cam sprocket so that when installed on the cam
a. The timing mark still on 0*
b. All the tension is taken out of the chain between the intake cam and the crankshaft
c. The cam is in the exact position shown below (clocked just to the right of “12 0’clock): Note: the mark on the sprocket will be in the center of a link just as show. You will need to rotate the cam slightly during this process to get everything lined up just right.

Install the chain on the exhaust cam sprocket, then install the sprocket on the cam by rotating the cam as needed. Look at the picture and count the number of links between the 2 marks. When correct the intake cam is clocked slightly right and the exhaust cam is clocked slightly left from 12 o’clock when the crank timing mark is still right at 0*



6: Install the timing chain tensioner. Compress the tensioner, and lock it in place:


Install it back in the timing cover. From inside the timing cover, press back on the tensioner with the chain guide to release it. Put a wrench on the exhaust cam and turn it counter clock wise to verify all the chain tension has been taken out. There will be a little bit of play but not much.

7: Inspect the timing marks. Verify they still all line up. If they do rotate the engine a couple rotation with a wrench on the cam (do this without spark plugs installed). Everything should rotate pretty easy. If you got it timed right at some point you should see this (the white links on the chain are lined up with the timing marks on the sprockets):


Part 6: Almost done!

1: Change oil filter and pour 4.5qts fresh conventional oil all over cam and timing chain.
Install: Valve cover, spark plugs, intake manifold, injectors and fuel rail assembly, coolant hoses, coil packs and plug wires, accessory belt, exhaust system, O2 sensor, cruise control.

2: Double check everything!

3: Top off coolant, check oil level


4: Prime the oiling system: Remove EFI fuse from the under hood fuse box. Turn the ignition key to the start position and turn over the engine for 20-30 seconds.


5: Put the fuse back and start this thing up! If you oiled everything like you were supposed to it will smoke pretty good for a few minutes. Check coolant and oil level again.

6: Break in: Check coolant and oil level again, then drive it like you stole it!
Drive it at varying engine speeds and throttle positions as much as possible to help seat the new rings. WOT is the best thing for the new rings to seat. Some people say baby the crap out of it durring break it. I don't agree but I thought I'd mention that so that you can do your own research and decide what method you prefer.
After 500 miles change the oil and filter again with conventional oil. I usually go another 2,000 miles and then do another change and change to synthetic at this point. Don’t forget to check coolant and oil level some more.
__________________
'00 Camry 2.2 auto. 205K

RIP '98 Prizm 4spd 310K hit deer 12/2/13
Oil consumption fixed @ 265K


Last edited by Bennie; 08-13-2013 at 07:20 AM.
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Old 01-26-2012, 02:50 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Wow! Good work!
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Old 01-27-2012, 08:12 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Bennie if you are going go this far with the head shouldn't you just go ahead and have the valves and seats ground?
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Old 01-27-2012, 09:41 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silverone View Post
Bennie if you are going go this far with the head shouldn't you just go ahead and have the valves and seats ground?
Based on the number of miles (lots), the way they looked (really good) and the fact that all of the valve clearance was perfectly in spec I didn't feel it was needed.

These heads are expensive to have work done on if you have the shop completely setup (valve "adjustment") everything. The shop that I bring my heads to for this type of thing quoted me $700. They are a top notch shop that specializes in head work. This head doesn't need it though. I probably wouldn't have walked out of there without having them port and polish the thing to. Which would have raised the cost, been totally sweet and completely unesessary for my aplication.
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'00 Camry 2.2 auto. 205K

RIP '98 Prizm 4spd 310K hit deer 12/2/13
Oil consumption fixed @ 265K


Last edited by Bennie; 01-27-2012 at 09:46 AM.
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Old 01-28-2012, 05:49 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bennie View Post
Based on the number of miles (lots), the way they looked (really good) and the fact that all of the valve clearance was perfectly in spec I didn't feel it was needed.

These heads are expensive to have work done on if you have the shop completely setup (valve "adjustment") everything. The shop that I bring my heads to for this type of thing quoted me $700. They are a top notch shop that specializes in head work. This head doesn't need it though. I probably wouldn't have walked out of there without having them port and polish the thing to. Which would have raised the cost, been totally sweet and completely unesessary for my aplication.
makes good sence as always thanks bennie.
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Old 02-07-2012, 12:12 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Nice write up, How is you oil consumption now, have you run enough miles to see?
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Old 02-07-2012, 12:28 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sam333 View Post
Nice write up, How is you oil consumption now, have you run enough miles to see?
I've put 2,200 miles on it and there has been absolutely ZERO oil consumption. I was picky when I filled it with oil and filled it to exactly the full line. It's still right on the full line. This is actually the second oil change so on this oil change I've only put 1,700 miles so far. But so sign of oil consumption.
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Oil consumption fixed @ 265K

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Old 02-09-2012, 10:18 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Howdy Bennie,

Glad to see someone do up some hard documentation on this problem (and the task of getting it done)... I did a complete rebuild on a '99 about 3/4 year ago and ran into the piston problem (gads what tiny little oil ring holes and yes, oil rings were collapsed and gummed up and stuck in the grooves). Just to note what I did, instead of just doing 2 extra holes in the oil ring groove, I did 2 on each side (adding a total of 4) equally spaced to each side of the original 2 about the same distance between the original 2, but not so far that the extra holes are so far out to the side that drilling would go into the pin shoulder. I also set up a jig to maintain a slight downward grade on the new drill holes as is the case on the original holes. I also enlarged and drilled out the original 2 to a size just under the width of the oil ring groove. Also, so far with about 2,500 miles, have not experienced any oil loss at this point.

One note, evidently from others comments and discussions I've read, this engine has a real problem of oil temps getting too hot on the piston skirts i.e. causing oil to sludge and carbon due to those tiny holes not allowing the oil to drain off easily increasing the risk of oil breakdown and sludging. Not changing oil regularly to where oil can break down more easily under high heat conditions would be death to this engine for sure which is what the prior owner did on an otherwise almost new engine. There was sludge piled up on all the top end like I've never seen. Anyone with an 8th gen needs to be sure to change the oil like clockwork. I've read that some increase their safety margin and avoided the oil breakdown risk by using synthetic.

Bennie, if you read this, do let me know how your gas economy is, and if you have a 3sp, 4sp or 5sp manual. I think in one of your other posts you mentioned you're getting about 30mpg? Do you have a 4sp or a 5sp? I am not getting impressive results on a 3sp (about 22-23 city) and a loss of about 2-3mpg with the A/C on) but with higher cc's due to being bored out 30thou, was told I might loose 2-4mpg but do have more low end torque and can say that this engine is now pretty gutzy. In looking at the fuel economy stats, 22-24 is about normal on a 3sp, but was hoping for more, and am seriously considering doing a swap out on the tranny and putting in a 4sp. Also, if anyone has any feedback on compatability issues, which torque converter and if the stock ECM and wire harness connections will work in swapping out a 3sp with a 4sp, would be appreciated.

Last edited by ToyotaBuba; 02-09-2012 at 10:25 PM. Reason: Added Clarifications on a question to Bennie
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Old 02-10-2012, 07:36 AM   #10 (permalink)
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ToyotaBuba,
Good to hear you've gone though the process too. I've done this on a couple 3 speeds and my current DD is a 4 speed. My last car (that my brother now drives) was a 3 speed. I drive 90% highway and it got right around 28-31MPG depending on the season. My current 4 speed gets about 30-36 depending on the season.

Here's what I'm thinking. Ive seen the upstream O2 sensors go bad both with and without the oil burning issue (I think the oil burning issue will take them out a lot quicker though). I've had to replace a couple of them that had the exact same symptom: Bad mileage. The didn't trip the check engine light, and the cars still ran perfect. they were both getting 20-22MPG no matter where or how they were driven.

If you have a scanner check the fuel trims. LTFT should be right around 0. it it's +7 or more I would suspect the O2 sensor. With your bored out motor it may through this off a little but I still think this is probably the best way to try to figure it out.

Also, at one point I did a calculation of the payoff for doing the 4 speed swap. If I remember right I figured $700 for parts and the payoff was about 50K miles. My 2 cars seemed to be 4-5MPG apart. That's a nice jump but it takes a lot of miles to just pay for the parts. If you have some good hookups on parts that number could change a bit. And also think about how long you plan on keeping the car.
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'00 Camry 2.2 auto. 205K

RIP '98 Prizm 4spd 310K hit deer 12/2/13
Oil consumption fixed @ 265K


Last edited by Bennie; 02-10-2012 at 07:38 AM.
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Old 02-19-2012, 09:11 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Hi Benie, thw documentation on the Corolla was awsome! The first time I have seen anything really worth while annd detailed. I have a question to clarify. I hhave a 2002 Corolla, 225,000KM, and I want to do the same engine pistion job. Will the oil pan just drop off or do I need to lift the engine and or remove the cross member underneath? Also are you able to remove ALL the pistion rod bolts for the end pistion form underneath with ease or do I need to do something special. This are my biggest conncerns.
At how many km's do you recommend changing the water pump and timing chain?
Many Thanks
Gpatel
gpatel416(ATsign)gmail.com
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Old 02-19-2012, 09:13 AM   #12 (permalink)
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hi, look foreward to your response Bennie.
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Old 02-19-2012, 10:23 AM   #13 (permalink)
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Gpatel: You will have to remove oil pan from the bottom. Then you can lift up engine from the top using a lift and place it on a hoist for further work. Do you have all the tools?

If this is your first time, I would get a factory repair manual (Not Haynes) and go through all steps mentally at least twice before beginning the work.
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Old 02-19-2012, 09:55 PM   #14 (permalink)
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hay Bennie did you remove the timing chain cover
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Old 02-21-2012, 07:54 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gpatel View Post
Will the oil pan just drop off or do I need to lift the engine and or remove the cross member underneath?
The beauty of this is that you don't need to lift/support the engine. You can do it all without touching a motor mount or moving the engine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gpatel View Post
Also are you able to remove ALL the pistion rod bolts for the end pistion form underneath with ease or do I need to do something special. This are my biggest conncerns.
I'm not going to lie, it's tight when you get to the number 4 piston. Actually removing the piston is the hardest part. If you have a 1/4 & 3/8 ratchet set with universal joints you will be just fine. It's more a pacients thing that a tool thing. You can rotate the crank to help out a little too. I didn't have any trouble torquing down the number 4 with just the torque wrench and a socket if that gives you some idea.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gpatel View Post
At how many km's do you recommend changing the water pump and timing chain?
Many Thanks
Gpatel
This is kind of a tricky question. There are specs for the chain & sprockets on how much they can stretch/wear. You really have to remove them to measure them. If you re-ring the motor like I do then you never have the oportunity to measure them. Both cars in my sig. have the original timing sets. I feel pretty comfortable saying that on a well cared for car you probably will never have to worry about the timing set. Maybe if I hit 500K miles I'll remove it and measure everything. So far at 265K everything LOOKS good.

As far as the water pump, replace it when it starts leaking or if there is play in the bearing. It's an easy job. I'm at 265K miles and it's still the factory pump on my current car. I got almost exactly 100K miles on a Gates pump on my last car and then it started leaking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cross Eyed Hippo View Post
hay Bennie did you remove the timing chain cover
Nope. You do not have to remove it to re-ring. It saves a lot of time not having to support the engine, remove the water pump and pull the entire timing cover. It's also a pretty tight space on that side of the engine.
__________________
'00 Camry 2.2 auto. 205K

RIP '98 Prizm 4spd 310K hit deer 12/2/13
Oil consumption fixed @ 265K


Last edited by Bennie; 02-21-2012 at 12:56 PM.
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