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1st Generation (1998-2003) Discussion area for the first generation Toyota Sienna.

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Old 05-09-2011, 08:47 PM   #1 (permalink)
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On Changing 2000 Sienna Spark Plugs

Going to be changing the spark plugs on my 2000 Sienna with 145,000 miles using Denso SK20R11 plugs in a few days.

The front three are clearly easy, the rear two on the drivers side look doable but the one on the passenger side has me concerned. I've seen a few things looking around online:

1) the use of a rubber hose to remove and install the plugs finger tight. Of course, that's after loosening and before tightening them. This looks desirable, especially in a tight area. Is it advisable?

2) a mention of a rack of some sort on the back three that involves removing bolts to gain access to the plugs. I didn't feel anything like that doing an exploratory. Does it exist on a 2000 model?

I'd rather not remove the wipers and the whole plastic assembly unless totally necessary. Any words of experience to share before I start? Do I need to blow the holes out with compressed air before removing the plug, or does the seal protect the cavity from debris?

Thought I saw some instructions on this site awhile back, but couldn't find anything significant.

Last edited by SiennaDriver; 05-09-2011 at 08:50 PM.
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Old 05-10-2011, 12:41 AM   #2 (permalink)
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The front three are simple. All you have to remove for them is the center plastic cover and the three coil pack things. The rubber boot on the plugs does seal the holes. Some people say to blow them out just the same. I never have.

1) The hose method is only for installing them. You'll never get a piece of vacuum hose on a plug in the head. It takes a bit of force. The method works. Just cram a 10" piece of vacuum hose on the end of a plug and slide it into the hole. The hose will prevent you from turning the plug if it cross threads. I've used this method but more recently I just do a real gentle job with an extension on the spark plug socket.

2) I don't know about a rack but you'll need to take the entire intake plenum off. Trying to do the job without taking the intake plenum and wiper cowl off will take far more time than it will to take them off.

The wiper cowl is really simple to take off. Remove the wiper arms. Remove the covers. Remove the bolts across the top and in the vent going into the cabin. Unplug the two drain hoses and wiper power connector. Lift out.

Taking the intake off is the big challenge to this job. There are a few connectors. There are a few hoses. There are a few ground straps. The really challenging part, at least for me, is the bracket on the back that braces it. Once it's off, access to the plugs is simple.

I'm pretty sure that trying any other way would take longer any way.
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Old 05-11-2011, 12:17 PM   #3 (permalink)
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That wasn't so bad. Easily removed the cowl (I discovered pushing the center pin of those plastic fasteners releases them) which made the driver side and middle one a lot easier, but getting the sockets gingerly onto the passenger side was still a challenge.

Replaced NGK BKR6EKPB-11 with Denso SK20R11. I trust that's OK.

Examining the old plugs with a magnifying glass shows them to still be in great shape, albeit a little rough from light tan deposits. That's amazing, and each appears perfectly gapped after 145,000 miles.

The car rides just the same as before changing. Maybe it was needless?




Last edited by SiennaDriver; 05-11-2011 at 12:20 PM.
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Old 05-11-2011, 07:29 PM   #4 (permalink)
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You took care of this on YOUR schedule, when it was convenient for you.
Spark plugs at 145K miles is routine maintenance.
You should not need to be concerned about them for at least another 100K miles.
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Old 05-11-2011, 11:45 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Exactly, that's what maintenance is for. It's to prevent problems. It could be compared to constantly adding more time to the clock on a time bomb.
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Old 05-13-2011, 04:13 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SiennaDriver View Post
That wasn't so bad. Easily removed the cowl (I discovered pushing the center pin of those plastic fasteners releases them) which made the driver side and middle one a lot easier, but getting the sockets gingerly onto the passenger side was still a challenge.

Replaced NGK BKR6EKPB-11 with Denso SK20R11. I trust that's OK.

Examining the old plugs with a magnifying glass shows them to still be in great shape, albeit a little rough from light tan deposits. That's amazing, and each appears perfectly gapped after 145,000 miles.

The car rides just the same as before changing. Maybe it was needless?


That is how it goes with Toyotas generally speaking.
On my NUMMI manufactured Geo Prizm the only things I had to replace out of necessity were the starter, Bosch Platinum 4 plugs (installed by the previous owner just before I got the car and caused 15mpg on 30+mpg car) and the heating control valve. The rest I found out to be in good shape after replacing (rotors, pads,struts,water pump, timing belt,valve cover gasket etc.

Till I saw a leak under my car. The fuel lines going on top of the fuel tank rusted out and were leaking gas. A costly repair. Another thing that goes with Toyotas, rust in road salt states eats the body of the car. I should have checked them before they got this bad, and that is maintenance neglected on my part. Maybe because that is my first car and I am inexperienced in driving in general and driving on salty Wisconsin roads in specific...
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Old 05-13-2011, 10:35 PM   #7 (permalink)
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There's plenty of room for you way out west in the Valley of the Sun. It's nice and warm and the environment won't try to eat your car.
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Old 05-14-2011, 09:18 AM   #8 (permalink)
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There's plenty of room for you way out west in the Valley of the Sun. It's nice and warm and the environment won't try to eat your car.
Thanks Black Sunshine.

I have no connection to Wisconsin but my wife does, whenever I talk about moving to another state (California,Colorado,Arizona,Washington etc) she says those states have their negative attributes too.
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Old 05-14-2011, 08:30 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Cars have gotten a LOT better at standing up to salt over the past number of years.
However, it is STILL something to keep an eye on.
That is one thing about these forums, reading them gives you an idea of what to watch out for on your particular vehicle.
Each vehicle has its own set of weak points.......learning them helps you to know what to check and perhaps (if you learn early enough) take action to prevent any issues.
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Old 05-15-2011, 09:39 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Thanks Black Sunshine.

I have no connection to Wisconsin but my wife does, whenever I talk about moving to another state (California,Colorado,Arizona,Washington etc) she says those states have their negative attributes too.
That is true. It's just starting to get up to 100 everyday now. We got lucky and had a really mild spring. Sometimes it can hit 100 in March. In July and August 120 is no problem. If you decide to run to your car without shoes on, you know, just to grab something. You may come back with blisters.

It'll be fine if you just tint your windows and get some really dark shades. It only rains about two weeks a year. There are no erosion problems. My front and back yard are gravel with shrubs. The only cheaper places to buy houses is WV and Detroit.
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Old 05-18-2011, 08:57 AM   #11 (permalink)
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You did a needless procedure for the bank 1 rear plugs. I can understand if you are over weight and got that gut in the way preventing you from properly reaching these plugs. But all you need is to get a 6 inch extension for the socket wrench and feel your way to each and every back plug. Once the socket has confirmed grasp of the plug you fit the handle on to the extension and remove the plug. I can do this for each of the rear plugs blind-folded. And when installing each plug do it with the extension and finger tighten prior to adding some torque with the wrench handle. Taking the cowl or whatever off is just a joke and adds way too much work to this procedure.
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