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10th Gen Corolla/2nd Gen Matrix Suspension, Brakes and Wheel Forum Slam. Poke. Drop. Tuck. STOP. A forum to discuss 10th Gen Corolla and 2nd Gen Matrix suspension, brakes and wheels even if you're rollin' OEM.

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Old 01-22-2011, 12:22 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arabianobsession View Post
ABS doesn't help you when you're sliding sideways......it has nothing to do with that....
You are correct in that nothing much other than driving skill and luck can help once you are already sliding sideways. However, you don't seem to understand the purpose or technology behind ABS.

ABS is intended to prevent you from getting sideways in the first place. To do that it rapidly cycles each brake many times in just seconds to prevent any one wheel from locking up and putting you sideways. That is the shuddering you hear and feel through the brake pedal. As a result, on sheer ice, it may seem to take longer to come to a complete stop. Just keep your pressure on the pedal and you will "generally" come to a complete stop in a controlled manner, without going sideways and causing an accident. It's usually people who hear the shuddering, think something is wrong, and take their foot off the brake that end up in trouble. The shuddering only means the ABS is doing it's job, responding much faster than human reflexes.

Is ABS perfect? No, but given the choice I'll take it over a non-ABS vehicle.
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Old 01-22-2011, 12:34 PM   #17 (permalink)
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I'm done arguing. This is stupid, we're not in high school anymore.

You have your opinion, I have mine.

End of discussion.
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Old 01-24-2011, 07:49 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Gumby1800 View Post
You are correct in that nothing much other than driving skill and luck can help once you are already sliding sideways. However, you don't seem to understand the purpose or technology behind ABS.

ABS is intended to prevent you from getting sideways in the first place. To do that it rapidly cycles each brake many times in just seconds to prevent any one wheel from locking up and putting you sideways. That is the shuddering you hear and feel through the brake pedal. As a result, on sheer ice, it may seem to take longer to come to a complete stop. Just keep your pressure on the pedal and you will "generally" come to a complete stop in a controlled manner, without going sideways and causing an accident. It's usually people who hear the shuddering, think something is wrong, and take their foot off the brake that end up in trouble. The shuddering only means the ABS is doing it's job, responding much faster than human reflexes.

Is ABS perfect? No, but given the choice I'll take it over a non-ABS vehicle.
Gumby,

I read your comments with great interest as I just picked up my 2011 Matrix last week. I was told a bit about the ABS and what to expect, but what you wrote confirmed what my father and the salesman said.

My father insisted that my next car have ABS as my old Hyundai without ABS spun into a ditch during a storm in late December. It was totalled, but fortunately I wasn't hurt. I was really scared because I had just tapped the brakes to see if the road was icey and then the car started spinning.

So far it has been pretty cold and icey here in Toronto, and I did notice some pulsing from the brakes on the new Matrix at a few stop signs. The good news is the car stops straight. I even tried the brakes in the same spot where my Hyundai spun out. No more spinning! I'm happy and my father is even happier knowing I'm safe.
I
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Old 01-24-2011, 09:27 AM   #19 (permalink)
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Just keep in mind that the ABS system is only a supplementary control system - it will not bend the laws of physics. If you run into a very slippery situation or carry too much speed for a transition, no amount of programming will regain control of the car.

Even though its reaction time is generally much faster than most people can react to a situation, so it will help you keep control in slippery situations, but it is far better to not rely on such systems as a primary control - treat them as your back-up control and you should be good to go.
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Old 01-24-2011, 03:33 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by fishexpo101 View Post
Just keep in mind that the ABS system is only a supplementary control system - it will not bend the laws of physics. If you run into a very slippery situation or carry too much speed for a transition, no amount of programming will regain control of the car.

Even though its reaction time is generally much faster than most people can react to a situation, so it will help you keep control in slippery situations, but it is far better to not rely on such systems as a primary control - treat them as your back-up control and you should be good to go.
Thanks for your concern, but don't worry!

I do know that ABS does not mean "Automatic" Braking System

My father used to do some rally driving before I came along, but he is still a mechanic. He keeps me well informed. Even he just got ABS in his latest car!
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Old 01-24-2011, 05:10 PM   #21 (permalink)
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I had rear ABS in my '92 Geo Tracker... On icy roads, it had a tendency to "spaz" the rear wheels and also cause driveline damage- my 4wd system functions properly and locks the front differential to the rear differential. More often than not, the rear ABS would be counteracted by the much more powerful disc brakes up front and as the rear brakes pulsed would cause a nasty vibration in the rear axle. I could go screaming through most turns just fine, but the instant I'd try to slow down before a turn it would go sideways... My system was assuredly different (tone wheel mounted to the rear differential) so perhaps the new Matrix system is better...

However, I removed the entire ABS setup and have not once had an issue with the vehicle going sideways in a "panic" situation. It may lock up all four tires but it will continue to slide in a forward motion with no tendency to turn at all.

My Camry, on the other hand... If those suckers lock up it's pretty much game over unless you're quick enough to let off the brake. I'd love an ABS system in that.
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Old 08-08-2012, 04:12 PM   #22 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by arabianobsession View Post
^take out the relay

Thanks..I did this and boy what a difference when stopping..I drive on gravel roads mostly and have always hated when abs would kick in and keep me from stopping..I'm a Rural Mail Carrier and more than once have the abs almost caused me not to stop and put me in close calls where I had to let off brake and steer out of trouble..I have an '03 Tundra SR5 and it has carried the mail since it was new..I have to stop about 500 times each day..Had I known that all I had to do was remove the 2 relays I would have done this years ago..A rough life for any vehicle but the truck has held up well..191K
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Old 01-21-2013, 11:59 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Everything I have heard from EXPERIENCED PROFESSIONAL DRIVERS is that in Canada (and also northern states) the ABS actually gets you into trouble in the winter. I can back this up with my own personal experience. I have driven several types of vehicles both with and without ABS and consistently ABS has lead to sliding into intersections or turning at wide angles just because there is a slight loss in traction. I have heard of people who have also had trouble backing out of their own driveways because the ABS comes on. At slow speeds sometimes you NEED to lock the brakes. I agree in principle that at highway speeds the added steering of ABS can be useful (though a skilled driver should be able to threshold brake without electronic assistance). But the problem is that when approaching stop signs at a crawl (less than 50 km/h) I shouldn't have to start braking half a mile away just to be certain that the ABS won't slide me into the intersection (which can happen in residential areas in with 6 inches of compressed snow and ice due to inadequate snow removal). I have also had other times where the car turns wider than you expect because the ABS kicks in. Sometimes with ICE a "controlled skid" can be the best way to successfully turn, but the ABS interferes and you slid onto the curb.

These situations are NOT due just to poor driving (although poor driving will obviously make them worse). I have driven in the same situations in a '94 Ram with poor tires and not had the same problems. Why? Cause when I tap the brakes it actually slows down even with glare ice! My RAV4 with good tires should do better but the ABS comes on even with a slight tap of the brakes.
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Old 01-05-2014, 12:29 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Hi

So I want to disable the ABS on my Corolla. I was wondering if I could pull the fuse in my bonnet to disable the ABS and if I were to do so which fuse would I pull.

I think if I were to pull the fuse from the interior, the other car features that are tied into the fuse wouldn't work.

If I can't pull the fuse in the bonnet, what are the other ways I could disable ABS? I read that removing the relay is an option, but I don't know how to do this so some information on how to do this would be great.

Also is there anything I should know if I were to reactivate ABS? For instance, would the ABS light be off when I presumably reactivate it or do I need to perform some extra steps to remove the ABS light?
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