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Old 03-13-2009, 03:16 PM   #1 (permalink)
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22re cylinder head replacement

hey guys,

I am about to attempt to swap the cylinder head off my engine, now since I am getting a brand new cylinder head it will have a fresh mating surface. But my concern is the block, should i check the deck for warpage? is it a good idea to swap a new head on to a block that has aprox 60-70k miles?

thanks everyone!

-Nate
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Old 03-13-2009, 03:58 PM   #2 (permalink)
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22RE Head Swap

I had a used head that had been resurfaced put on my 93 pick-up about 5 years ago. I didn't do the work myself, but I know there was nothing done to the block. It had 217,000 miles at the time and now it has 315,000 miles. It has held up pretty well. The only thing is, it loses anti-freeze somewhere. I have to add about 1/2 gallon per oil change. With that many miles I guess that is to be expected. The one thing I wished I had done is put a OEM Toyota timing chain back on mine instead of an aftermarket. The guides have rattled ever since.
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Old 03-13-2009, 04:29 PM   #3 (permalink)
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thanks for the info,

I just got this truck from my bother about 6 months ago, when he had it the bottom end was replaced after the rings went bad, the original cylinder head was used, the truck has 430,000 miles on it and is running great. The problem I am having is i guess over the course of those 430k the proper anti-freeze/water mixture was not used, and the cylinder had has developed a pee sized hole corroded from the inside out, shooting cooling onto the header.



I guess after this is all said and done it will run a LOT better, this old head has worn out valve guides on both sides causing excessive oil build up inside the intake manifold.
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Old 03-13-2009, 04:47 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Cast iron blocks are not very likely to warp unless the heat gets real extreme, but they can erode, be pitted, or be scratched, creating low spots. Engines run with corrosive coolant are even more likely to have this problem. If you still have the old gasket, look for rusty areas: there could well be low spots on the block in the same areas.

So, yes, I think you should check block for flatness before installing the new gasket. Somehow you'll have to beg, borrow or buy a high precision straight edge and poke around under it with your feeler gauge. Flatness specs are in the fsm.

Now if you were planning on installing an mls (multi-layer-steel) gasket instead of the more common graphite type, you would need to get your block milled, but you're probably not doing that, are you?

Here's a pretty good article on the process:
http://www.aa1car.com/library/ic697.htm
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Old 03-13-2009, 04:56 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sb5walker View Post
Cast iron blocks are not very likely to warp unless the heat gets real extreme, but they can erode, be pitted, or be scratched, creating low spots. Engines run with corrosive coolant are even more likely to have this problem. If you still have the old gasket, look for rusty areas: there could well be low spots on the block in the same areas.

So, yes, I think you should check block for flatness before installing the new gasket. Somehow you'll have to beg, borrow or buy a high precision straight edge and poke around under it with your feeler gauge. Flatness specs are in the fsm.

Now if you were planning on installing an mls (multi-layer-steel) gasket instead of the more common graphite type, you would need to get your block milled, but you're probably not doing that, are you?


Here's a pretty good article on the process:
http://www.aa1car.com/library/ic697.htm


Yea I am going going to order the headgasket from enginebulder (oem type), along with new head bolts. I have yet to take anything apart I was just gauging interest in what I am in for. I am going to be attempting it this weekend or early next week.

also, so you are saying if the engine has ran for periods of time with water, or improper mixture it is more prone to getting those low spots? even if when it was rebuilt the original head was resurfaced?


when I get everything apart i will check the headgasket for rust in unusual spots.

thanks again
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Old 03-13-2009, 06:05 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Nathans2k View Post
...also, so you are saying if the engine has ran for periods of time with water, or improper mixture it is more prone to getting those low spots? even if when it was rebuilt the original head was resurfaced?
Coolant that has become acidic because it was wasn't changed every two years, or if incompatible types were mixed (including if types were changed without FULLY!!! flushing the old coolant like six times, including flushing the heater core), or if tap water was mixed with the coolant, then the acidic coolant tends to rust the sealing rings of the head gasket, as well as corroding the iron block.

Rust in the coolant galleries inside the block is not a great thing, but doesn't necessarily affect the head gasket surface. But if the coolant manages to rust the head gasket sealing rings, then the iron block surface immediately below that rusty ring is also probably rusty, and that can create a low spot.

Sometimes it's hard to test that low spot since it may be more narrow than a feeler gauge. Trying to shine a light under the straight edge may be a better way of seeing if there is in fact a low spot; of course that won't tell you how low the spot is. Graphite does a good job of sealing small imperfections, but if the low spot is directly under the steel sealing ring of the gasket, you really should have the block milled.

Good luck with it, and post some pictures if you can. It's always interesting to see what things look like in there!
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Old 03-13-2009, 09:28 PM   #7 (permalink)
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unless you really ran the engine hot or you have bad pitting in the block deck surface,i don't think you will have any problems with the block warping.you can add a radiator rust inhibitor product called nal-cool,that stuff is good for stopping and controlling scale buildup.the best thing you can do to avoid rust in the cooling system is use distilled water/antifreeze mix.
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Old 03-13-2009, 10:15 PM   #8 (permalink)
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There's no need to use additives to stop scale buildup. Toyota brand coolant + distilled water is 100% free of silicates and calcium carbonate so there will be ZERO scale buildup in your radiator and engine.
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