DIY - gen3/4 power steering pump rebuild - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car and Truck Forums
Camry 3rd & 4th Gen (1992-1996 & 1997-2001)/1st Gen Solara (1999-2003) Toyota Camry Discussion for years 1992-1996 & 1997-2001, as well as Solara discussion for years 1999-2003. Topics of discussion range from fuel economy, safety, modifications, performance all involving America's favorite family car, the Toyota Camry.

 3Likes
  • 1 Post By insightbrewery
  • 2 Post By insightbrewery
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 12 Old 04-14-2019, 02:37 PM Thread Starter
short-throw dipstick
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 5,381
Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1740 Post(s)
Thanks: 632
Thanked 675 Times in 610 Posts
Lifetime Supreme Member
iTrader Score: 0 reviews
(Thread Starter)
DIY - gen3/4 power steering pump rebuild

What up, gen3/4 enthusiasts! I had an opportunity to relax and rebuild a few gen3/4 P/S pumps I had laying around (man, I need HELP) so I thought I'd take some pics and share with y'all. I had one laying around, plus two from the cars involved in my ongoing 5S-FE/A140E swap.

So why would one attempt to rebuild the power steering pump? Well, the primary (and really, only) reason is leakage. The seals go after so many thousands of miles, and the pump starts leaking, making an oily mess of everything. This is a good project for the average DIYer; rebuilding run-of-the-mill power steering pumps on mainline Japanese cars is not something shops do, because it is time-consuming with few benefits vs. getting a rebuilt pump from a big rebuilder such as Cardone, or a new pump. I'm a shop, but I rebuild them if the customer is OK with waiting an extra day...I rather enjoy it. The key to having the highest chance of success with this project is to work in a clean environment and take time to make sure everything goes back with exactly the orientation required.

Note that the pump is the same between the 5S and the 1MZ; the only differences are the brackets and the rear housing. The latter doesn't matter (haha, that rhymes!) because the seals and positioning are the same.

Caveats? Well, I've rebuilt a fair few pumps, and noticed that sometimes, the pump starts whining after the rebuild. On each of those [two, one Honda, one Toyota truck], I ripped them apart again to check that I hadn't put the relief valve in backwards, or installed the vanes wrong...nada. I can only conclude that by sealing leaks that were doubling as pressure reliefs, the pressure was forced through worn zones in the pump that would now start making noise. If this happens to you, live with it, or replace the pump. Sorry if it doesn't work out.

Oh, and as always, you may not hold me or Toyota Nation responsible for your shenanigans. If you hurt yourself or others, or screw up your car, that is on you and you alone. You follow this guide at your own risk.

With that being said, let's get started!

00 Camry 5S-FE 178k BLOWN MOTOR/TRANS
01 ES300 147k NEEDS TRANS WORK
01 Insight 137k BROKEN CAMSHAFT
02 Insight 178k DC-DC BELLY-UP
08 STS-V 67k 570 RWHP!
01 Viggen 112k 400 FWHP
insightbrewery is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 12 Old 04-14-2019, 02:38 PM Thread Starter
short-throw dipstick
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 5,381
Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1740 Post(s)
Thanks: 632
Thanked 675 Times in 610 Posts
Lifetime Supreme Member
iTrader Score: 0 reviews
(Thread Starter)
Parts & Tools

Parts (part numbers in bold)

- a rebuild kit. I'm using a Powercraft 8798, but any of the usual seal kit culprits will do. Edelmann, Gates, Sunsong, Omega...just off the top of my head. Note that they all come with an instruction sheet that says "Toyota Product"; I don't know if this means that the seals in the kit are reboxed Toyota parts (probably, given how they look) or what. I would like to note that none of the aftermarket kits come with the OE banjo bolt gasket; they supply two copper washers to take its place

You can also go for an OE kit. Check your application, but for my '00 5S and my '99 1MZ, the kit is 04446-06040. Something interesting is that there is still a different kit supplied for locally-produced 5S of that year: 04446-06030

- your favorite compatible power steering fluid. All Toyotas of this era use ATF as the power steering fluid; Dexron III will have been originally specified, but you can use a wide range of ATFs. Note that modern, "water-thin" ATFs such as Dexron VI may cause some whining; that might be annoying, but doesn't cause any harm. I like to use Valvoline MaxLife ATF, which is basically a Dexron VI with a lot of seal swellers, which help condition the rest of the seals and rubber hoses in the P/S system. Do NOT use Idemitsu P/S fluid or other stuff designed for Honda P/S systems...they will contribute to early failure of Toyota pumps

- if it's leaking, the suction hose. You'll have to look this up yourself, mine wasn't leaking so I reused it. It's the big hose going from the reservoir down to the pump

- a reservoir, only if yours is clogged beyond salvation. Most P/S reservoirs nowadays (gen3/4 cars included) have a screen. If the P/S system hasn't been serviced in a long time, that screen may be clogged so bad that it's more feasible to just replace it. Mine cleaned up nicely as the P/S system had been taken care of, so I reused it

- an inline filter. I got a Cardone 20-0038F, which is a nice little filter incorporating a magnet, made for 3/8" tubing. Now is a good time to install one of these, as it'll extend the life of the system and prevent the reservoir from getting clogged up


Tools

- sockets. Specifically, 10mm, 12mm, 14mm, 17mm impact-rated, 24mm impact-rated, and 27mm

- vise. This ain't happenin' without one, so get one

- 90-degree needlenose pliers

- lineman's pliers. Only if you don't have an impact wrench

- larger dead-blow mallet. 48 oz and above

- flathead screwdriver with tip wrapped in electrical tape

- small (pocket) flathead screwdriver

- torque wrenches. You need an in-lb wrench and a 3/8"-drive ft-lb wrench

- 1/2" socket to 3/8" step-down adapter. Probably need this

- brake parts cleaner

- something clean to wipe with, that has to be mostly lint-free. AKA, don't use shop rags, they'll dump lint into the pump. A little bit of lint is OK, as it'll get caught by the filter that you'll be installing. If you're not installing a filter, get lint-free wipes such as microscope wipes (Kimtech or equivalent)

- optional tools: impact wrench and impact driver. The impact wrench will definitely make your life easier in one of the steps, but is not strictly necessary. It may not be an option for you if your engine and transmission are still in the vehicle. The impact driver is just to make small bolt removal faster

00 Camry 5S-FE 178k BLOWN MOTOR/TRANS
01 ES300 147k NEEDS TRANS WORK
01 Insight 137k BROKEN CAMSHAFT
02 Insight 178k DC-DC BELLY-UP
08 STS-V 67k 570 RWHP!
01 Viggen 112k 400 FWHP
insightbrewery is online now  
post #3 of 12 Old 04-14-2019, 02:39 PM Thread Starter
short-throw dipstick
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 5,381
Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1740 Post(s)
Thanks: 632
Thanked 675 Times in 610 Posts
Lifetime Supreme Member
iTrader Score: 0 reviews
(Thread Starter)
Start here!

First off, pardon the cruddy pics - I was doing this in the middle of a shop floor, with poor fluorescent lighting on one side and sunlight at my back. Santa Clara is fitting LED tubes in place of fluorescents as a treat from the city but we got a ways to go before the lowest bidder gets to us .

Now, I'm doing this with the powertrain removed from the vehicle - you probably aren't, so I'll make suggestions as I can. However, working with what you have is, well, exactly that - on you. First thing you want to do is unbolt the pump from the engine and let it drop.

The P/S pump has two lines going to it: the suction hose, and the pressure line. Stick a drain pan underneath the car to catch all the nasty old P/S fluid that'll gush:




Grab your needlenose pliers and release the three-finger ("shocker" wahaha) clamp that holds the suction line to the pump, then twist to break the grip and pull it off the pump:




Let it drip out; this will empty the reservoir as well. Next, unbolt the banjo bolt fitting that holds the pressure line to the pump. WARNING: make sure to first remove the harness connector from the pressure switch, otherwise you may rip it off when you try to remove the pump. If you have a gen3, you have an idle-up switch instead which will have two vacuum lines going to the intake manifold; both systems serve the same purpose, to raise the engine's idle when power steering is under high load (i.e, at steering lock) to prevent the engine stalling. I got it easy, using a 24mm socket and impact wrench:




...otherwise, you can try holding the pump with a pair of lineman's pliers:




...while you use an adjustable wrench or a ratchet and 24mm socket (if you can get it in there).

The pressure switch is screwed into the banjo fitting, no need to remove it:




Remove the double-gasket from the pressure line banjo:




Pretty cool:




Now, with the pump out of the car, you can spin the pulley by hand to pump out most of the fluid remaining in the unit:




Stick the pump in your vise and counterhold the pulley for removal. You can use a cam pulley holder, a long extension, some pliers, or a spare wrench like I did:




If you have an impact driver or wrench, easy peasy with a 17mm socket. Otherwise, break it loose by hand and back it off some so there's a gap:




Take the pump out of the vise, grab a rag and hold the pulley. Have the pump in midair:




...then, see that bigass mallet next to it? Well, grab yours and whack the nut until the pulley is free from the splines on the shaft. Rust is the usual culprit here. Unscrew the nut, and remove the pulley:




...oh man, those pumps are gross! If that wasn't enough for you, here's a closer look:




Now we remove the brackets. Again, this guide is for a 5S pump; the only difference for a 1MZ pump is the brackets. There's three 14mm bolts on the back to deal with, 2 longer ones and a shorter one:




The 2 longer ones hold the front bracket to the assembly, remove them and the front bracket first:




Remove the final bolt, here are the free brackets:




The bolts:




At this point, clean up the pump and brackets. I used a heated parts washer, but use whatever makes you happy. Don't worry about getting solvent or soap into the pump, we'll be washing the guts with brake parts cleaner.

Now, unbolt the suction port union (12mm bolt):




Twist it out, there's an o-ring:




Next, unbolt the pressure port union. Stick the pump back in the vise; this'll be more difficult now that the brackets are off. Try to clamp on one half of the housing or the other, but if you must squeeze both housing halves together, don't squeeze too hard. An impact wrench and 24mm socket will make this cake:




The union has an o-ring as well:




Underneath it lies the flow control valve and spring. Here's a top-down view of the valve:




...flip the pump over and dump the valve and spring out onto your work surface:




...if they're not coming out, pour some ATF into the hole and work the valve up and down with your finger to lube it up (wahaha). Next up, undo the 4 12mm bolts that clamp the rear housing:




...impact driver, if you have it. There are 2 short bolts and 2 long bolts; the way to remember where they go is to look at the height of the boss on the pump. The short bolts will have a short boss:




...and the long bolts will have a tall boss:




...after removing the bolts, the housing will pop up because it's holding down a wave washer. It has a projection inside with an o-ring around it:




...remove that and discard. Here's what's on the other side:




...notice the wave washer and the o-ring just below it:




Remove the wave washer and set it aside (we're going to use it again). Remove the big o-ring and discard.

Next up, pull the side plate that covers the end of the pump stack off:




And here's the heart of the pump:




...the shaft spins the rotor, and that flings the vanes out in the cavity and seals them against the cam ring (outside part). The eccentric shape is to boost static pressure, IIRC.

Remove the housing gasket:




There's a snap ring on the shaft holding it against the rotor to prevent the shaft from backing out of the pump:




Use a small, pocket flathead to remove the snap ring and discard it:




Then, flip the pump over onto your work surface to drop the cam ring, rotor, and vanes out:




...something to note. What you're seeing in that image is the stack upside down. The marks on the cam ring would be facing outward (they're facing down now), but the mark on the rotor is facing backward (up in the pic). The FSM says to assemble them with both marks facing outward. Notable is that all 3 pumps that I rebuilt have the marks as you see in the pic, not as the FSM says. We'll revisit this.

And now, we can remove the shaft:




Put the pump back in the vise, grab your electrical tape-wrapped flathead and pry out the shaft seal:




...these pumps are a very simple design; there isn't a "skateboard" bearing like other pumps. Rather, there's a long bearing and the shaft rides on a film of ATF in it. Check out the cool lube channels in the bearing:




...and that is disassembly. Go ahead and clean both housing halves and all the other parts with brake parts cleaner to prep for reassembly. Here's the rebuild kit:




Open it up, nab the new shaft seal and lube it up good with ATF (Use ATF whenever you're lubing stuff up on this job), inside and out. In fact, just dip it in ATF if you want! Put the front housing back in the vise. A 27mm socket is perfect for installing the new seal:




...grab your dead-blow mallet and tap it in until the seal is flush with the housing. The 27mm socket is slightly larger than the seal, so it will stop at the housing. Flush:




Now back to the shaft. When shaft seals get old and aren't doing their job anymore, sometimes they wear grooves in the shaft:




The new shaft seal should seal fine against the shaft. If your shaft is visibly tapered (wahaha), you got a problem; get a replacement pump. Lube up the shaft (wahaha) and slide it in until it stops:




Lube up the cam ring and install it to the front housing:




...only two of the holes are big enough to accommodate the straight pins. Note that the three dot-marks are facing outward.

Lube up the rotor and install it to the splines on the end of the shaft:




...you may have to hold the shaft from the other side to prevent it backing out. Note that I followed the FSM instructions and faced the square-mark outward. We'll see if there are any adverse reactions!

Next up is the vanes. Take a look at this one:




...note that one side is square and the other is rounded (if you can't see, the left side is rounded). The square side faces toward the shaft, and the rounded side seals against the cam ring when the vane gets flung out. I want to point out that the pump from the donor car (PO was running Idemitsu P/S fluid) had vanes that were significantly more worn than the pump out of my car (running MaxLife ATF). If the vanes are worn on both sides to where you can't tell which side is out or in, check the discoloration.

Lube up the vanes with ATF, and slip them into the slots on the rotor. Don't force them or you may chip the rotor or vanes, which will cause cavitation issues. Here're all the vanes installed:




Next up, install the housing gasket. All the ATF you've been lubing the installed parts with will have leaked onto the flat sealing surface of the front housing. Wipe that up first, then put the housing gasket on. There's a wrong way:




...notice how it covers the hole at the bottom of the pic. And the right way:




...much better.

00 Camry 5S-FE 178k BLOWN MOTOR/TRANS
01 ES300 147k NEEDS TRANS WORK
01 Insight 137k BROKEN CAMSHAFT
02 Insight 178k DC-DC BELLY-UP
08 STS-V 67k 570 RWHP!
01 Viggen 112k 400 FWHP
insightbrewery is online now  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 12 Old 04-17-2019, 10:17 PM
Almost 1/2 Million Miles!
 
guapoman2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 1,631
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 276 Post(s)
Thanks: 129
Thanked 156 Times in 143 Posts
iTrader Score: 0 reviews
Too late for my 1992 Camry as the original power steering pump is gone!


I am stuck with a re-manufactured as for my year no one offers brand new any longer!


It works but, the REMAN is not as quiet as the original!
guapoman2000 is offline  
post #5 of 12 Old 04-18-2019, 01:30 AM
TN Post Wh*re
 
Kingdom934's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Wahiawa, Hawaii
Posts: 8,539
Blog Entries: 1
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2046 Post(s)
Thanks: 320
Thanked 692 Times in 615 Posts
iTrader Score: 1 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by guapoman2000 View Post
Too late for my 1992 Camry as the original power steering pump is gone!


I am stuck with a re-manufactured as for my year no one offers brand new any longer!


It works but, the REMAN is not as quiet as the original!<img src="https://www.toyotanation.com/forum/images/ToyotaNation_2014/smilies/tango_face_crying.png" border="0" alt="" title="Crying" class="inlineimg" />
I’ve had issues with aftermarket high pressure hoses causes fluid restriction.

'85 Camry DLX 162K
'87 Cressida 78K
'04 Camry XLE V6 119K
'98 Camry LE AE V6 228K
'06 IS250 + sport pkg 153K
'04 Camry SE I4 5SPD 199K
Kingdom934 is offline  
post #6 of 12 Old 04-18-2019, 05:21 AM
Almost 1/2 Million Miles!
 
guapoman2000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Orlando, Florida
Posts: 1,631
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 276 Post(s)
Thanks: 129
Thanked 156 Times in 143 Posts
iTrader Score: 0 reviews
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kingdom934 View Post
Iíve had issues with aftermarket high pressure hoses causes fluid restriction.



Which brand????


I got my Camry's Power Steering Pump and High Pressure Hose done by a Pro Mechanic shop.


Their Pump Failed and he had to do it all over again. I felt really bad but, the crap shoot is the Pump and not the hose.


Here's what I got installed.


Attached Images
File Type: jpg Import Direct.jpg (178.3 KB, 58 views)

Last edited by guapoman2000; 04-18-2019 at 10:17 AM.
guapoman2000 is offline  
post #7 of 12 Old 04-18-2019, 10:50 AM Thread Starter
short-throw dipstick
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 5,381
Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1740 Post(s)
Thanks: 632
Thanked 675 Times in 610 Posts
Lifetime Supreme Member
iTrader Score: 0 reviews
(Thread Starter)
Import Direct cheapest Chinese garbage. I had a customer who put one of those on, failed within a couple weeks at the crimp.

I remember you mentioning that you have access to commercial parts suppliers. If you can access a good catalog such as WorldPAC or something local/mom-and-pop, next time try a Nichirin hose. Japan-made, I just installed three on a gen4 Camry, a gen6 Accord, and a gen5 Camry. Rebuilt the pumps on all three, all three are leak-free and noiseless, even under high load.

Also, guys, please hold off on the comments until I'm done uploading pics so that the flow isn't interrupted anymore, in case I need multiple posts. Thanks.
71Corolla likes this.

00 Camry 5S-FE 178k BLOWN MOTOR/TRANS
01 ES300 147k NEEDS TRANS WORK
01 Insight 137k BROKEN CAMSHAFT
02 Insight 178k DC-DC BELLY-UP
08 STS-V 67k 570 RWHP!
01 Viggen 112k 400 FWHP
insightbrewery is online now  
post #8 of 12 Old 04-19-2019, 10:40 PM Thread Starter
short-throw dipstick
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 5,381
Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1740 Post(s)
Thanks: 632
Thanked 675 Times in 610 Posts
Lifetime Supreme Member
iTrader Score: 0 reviews
(Thread Starter)
Continued.

Next, nab the snap ring out of the kit, lube it up, and install it to the end of the shaft to secure the pump stack:




Lube up the side plate and install it to the stack (no orientation, just make sure the straight pins end up in the holes):




Lube up the wave washer and install it to the side plate, making sure the teeth end up in the slots:




Grab the big o-ring from the kit, lube it up, and install it to the side plate:




Now there are 3 o-rings left. Take a look at the 2 medium-sized ones:




...one is thicker than the other. Take the thicker one, lube it up, and install it to the projection in the rear housing (bottom it out):




...I like to pour some ATF in there, but maybe don't go crazy like I did in the pic (I had to mop some up so it wouldn't drip all over the gasket). Now check out how the holes will line up when you flip the rear housing onto the rest of the pump:




...flip it on, and snug it down with the 4 12mm housing bolts (snug until there is no gap between the housing halves):




Now take the remaining medium-sized o-ring, lube it up, and install it to the pressure port union (discard the old o-ring if you haven't already):




...a caveat: See where my index finger is? That edge is sharp. Be careful that it doesn't cut up the new o-ring.

Next up, lube up the flow control valve and spring and drop them into the pressure port. If you forget how they go together scroll back to the disassembly pics; drop them in together (spring end first), then pour some ATF in and work the valve up and down with your finger to make sure it moves smoothly. Bad pic, but reinstalled:




Then, screw the pressure port union in over the valve.

Final o-ring: the tiny one. Install it to the suction port union (lubed up!) and twist the port into the pump, then snug down the 12mm retaining bolt:




Now, secure the pump in the vise like so:




...and torque the stuff you've installed so far. 17 ft-lbs for the housing bolts, 9 ft-lbs for the suction port retaining bolt, and 62 ft-lbs for the pressure port union. You need to properly counterhold the pump to torque the pressure port; don't squeeze too hard with the vise or you'll oval the housing. Or, just wait until the brackets are installed so you can have a surface to hold on.

Here's the front bracket lined up with its holes:




...and the rear:




Now for the 3 14mm bolts for the brackets. Install the long ones first to hold the front bracket, then screw in the short one. Here they are, short one is not yet screwed in all the way:




Now secure the bracket in the vise like so:




...if you have the pivot bolt handy from the engine, you can easily line up the slot with the captive nut. Make sure the bracket bolts are accessible like so:




...then line up the aforementioned slot and captive nut, then torque the bracket bolts to 32 ft-lbs (short bolt first). After you do that, torque the pressure port union if you haven't already.

Now for the pulley. I like to lube up the pulley splines with some ATF or penetrating lube before sliding it onto the splines on the shaft. Then, use a deep 17mm socket to hand-tighten the nut until the pulley bottoms out (hold the pulley with your other hand, of course):




Counterhold the pulley with a long extension or similar so you can torque it:




Closer look:




...torque is 32 ft-lbs.

Aaaaand here's the rebuilt pump:




Next up, we're going to install an inline filter. The perfect place (IMO) is this section of hose here:




...that's part of the return piping. Undo the spring clamps and remove the hose:




It's got some cracking, so we'll replace it:




Here's the inline filter, marked with flow direction:




Cap is snap-ring'd in:




...back to the hose. I'm replacing it with Gates 3/8" transmission oil cooler hose from NAPA:




The filter comes with new clamps, so cut your replacement hose in two and install the pieces to the filter with the clamps. May want to lube toe filter and/or the hoses with ATF to ease assembly:




Trim the ends so the assembly is approximately the same length as the old hose:




The old hose is whatever metric hose is close to 3/8", and the old clamps are too big for the replacement SAE hose. So, you have to replace them with replacement clamps. Lube up the hose ends and install the assembly back in the vehicle with new clamps (I used small worm gear clamps):




...make sure the flow direction sticker points upwards (AKA, back to the reservoir).

Next up, we'll clean the reservoir. Remove the cap and take a look inside:




...see the screen? Most P/S reservoirs have such a screen. On Japanese cars, that reservoir tends to be expensive (if you want OE) so cleaning the screen by back-flushing is a good idea. Sometimes, P/S systems that haven't had the fluid changed in a long time can clog that screen with particulate matter, and P/S doesn't work properly because the pump can't suck fluid past the obstruction.

Two hoses going to the reservoir, the larger suction hose and the smaller return hose:




Suction hose first, 90-degree needlenose:




Here's the suction hose removed:




...if that hose is hard (wahaha), or you see leaking or cracking, replace it.

Remove the return line as well:




Then pull the reservoir up to release it from its mounting bracket. Here's a pic to give you an idea of how it's held in:




...if it doesn't come out easily, release the bracket's tang with a flathead screwdriver.

Now give the reservoir a good cleaning. I back-flushed it with a heated parts washer (and gave the outside a good scrubbing:




...then washed it out with brake parts cleaner:




...NOTE: I'm using 50-state (CA-legal) brake parts cleaner, which is canned acetone. I don't know how 49-state legal brake parts cleaner (chlorinated) will affect the reservoir plastic.

Clean:




...and installed:




Finally, the rebuild kit should have come with two copper washers to replace that cool connected-gasket for the pressure banjo bolt:




Install the banjo back to the P/S pump with those washers on either side of the banjo fitting, make sure the stopper on the banjo is pushing up against the front bracket, then torque to 38 ft-lbs:




...reattach the suction hose and move its "shocker" clamp into position, then reinstall the pump to the engine. After you get the belt right, just tighten the pivot bolt and the lock bolt; I highly doubt you'll be trying to torque them. BTW, if they have been overtightened in the past and damaged the front bracket, sometimes the belt will not hold tension. If that is your issue, you must replace the front bracket. Oh, pivot bolt torque is 21 ft-lbs, lock bolt is 32 ft-lbs, and belt tension is 80 lbs +- 20 for a new belt.

And after all this is done, bleed the system with a good ATF and enjoy your leak-free P/S system!
JohnGD and norm356 like this.

00 Camry 5S-FE 178k BLOWN MOTOR/TRANS
01 ES300 147k NEEDS TRANS WORK
01 Insight 137k BROKEN CAMSHAFT
02 Insight 178k DC-DC BELLY-UP
08 STS-V 67k 570 RWHP!
01 Viggen 112k 400 FWHP
insightbrewery is online now  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to insightbrewery For This Useful Post:
ajkalian (04-20-2019), JohnGD (04-24-2019)
post #9 of 12 Old 04-19-2019, 10:50 PM Thread Starter
short-throw dipstick
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 5,381
Mentioned: 38 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1740 Post(s)
Thanks: 632
Thanked 675 Times in 610 Posts
Lifetime Supreme Member
iTrader Score: 0 reviews
(Thread Starter)
OK, posts are accounted for, go crazy with the comments guys

00 Camry 5S-FE 178k BLOWN MOTOR/TRANS
01 ES300 147k NEEDS TRANS WORK
01 Insight 137k BROKEN CAMSHAFT
02 Insight 178k DC-DC BELLY-UP
08 STS-V 67k 570 RWHP!
01 Viggen 112k 400 FWHP
insightbrewery is online now  
post #10 of 12 Old 04-20-2019, 05:57 AM
Official TN Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Florida
Posts: 120
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 34 Post(s)
Thanks: 23
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
iTrader Score: 0 reviews
Nice job and write-up. Thanks.
rob120261 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to rob120261 For This Useful Post:
insightbrewery (04-20-2019)
post #11 of 12 Old 04-20-2019, 12:23 PM
BMR
Sheriff of Mayberry
 
BMR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Colorado
Posts: 12,196
Mentioned: 45 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1822 Post(s)
Thanks: 533
Thanked 2,203 Times in 1,903 Posts
Lifetime Supreme Member
Garage
iTrader Score: 2 reviews
Stickified.

There were already two pump rebuild DIYs there, but another canít hurt. Sometimes one detailed pic can make something clear for someone.

2015 RAV4 Limited, AWD, tech pkg, Barcelona red metallic, 62k miles
1996 Avalon XLS, ABS brakes, super white II, acquired w/ 139k, now at 397k
1992 Camry LE, V6 (3VZ-FE), ABS brakes, dark emerald pearl, owned since new. Replaced HGs @332k, totaled at 384k miles
BMR is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to BMR For This Useful Post:
insightbrewery (04-20-2019)
post #12 of 12 Old 04-20-2019, 10:23 PM
TN Post Wh*re
 
Kingdom934's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Wahiawa, Hawaii
Posts: 8,539
Blog Entries: 1
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2046 Post(s)
Thanks: 320
Thanked 692 Times in 615 Posts
iTrader Score: 1 reviews
I like a lot of pictures so this one is spot on.

I need to do this to my 1995 V6 so I can stop leaking so much PS fluid.

'85 Camry DLX 162K
'87 Cressida 78K
'04 Camry XLE V6 119K
'98 Camry LE AE V6 228K
'06 IS250 + sport pkg 153K
'04 Camry SE I4 5SPD 199K
Kingdom934 is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to Kingdom934 For This Useful Post:
insightbrewery (04-21-2019)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

  Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car and Truck Forums > Toyota Passenger and Sports Car Forums > Camry and Solara Forum > Camry 3rd & 4th Gen (1992-1996 & 1997-2001)/1st Gen Solara (1999-2003)

Bookmarks

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome