Broken stud - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car and Truck Forums
Camry 3rd & 4th Gen (1992-1996 & 1997-2001)/1st Gen Solara (1999-2003) Toyota Camry Discussion for years 1992-1996 & 1997-2001, as well as Solara discussion for years 1999-2003. Topics of discussion range from fuel economy, safety, modifications, performance all involving America's favorite family car, the Toyota Camry.

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post #1 of 6 Old 05-17-2019, 09:22 PM Thread Starter
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Broken stud

So I was tightening down the nuts on the water inlet on my 1992 Camry and I guess I was tightening the rear one on an angle, and the top snapped off. Is there an easy way to fix this? Here’s a photo of the part I am talking about.

Note: The missing nut was put back on, and it is only leaking from where the rear stud broke, so the gasket is fine.
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post #2 of 6 Old 05-17-2019, 09:38 PM
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"Is there an easy way to fix this?"

It all depends, if the stud is broken off flush it will be more difficult, but it can be fixed.

Step 1) drain the coolant and remove that hose outlet completely, to fully expose the stub

Step 2) if the stud is sticking up a little, heat it with a propane torch (don't want to get it too hot, and don't want to melt any wiring or other hoses nearby, just get the stud good and hot), then touch a candle to the base so its wax is drawn into the threads

Step 3) use a stud extractor (a kind of a socket with rolling bars inside which grips the end of a stud for removal) on your ratchet. If you don't have one, or access to borrow one, then if the stub is long enough fit two matching nuts, torque them against each other and turn the lower one with an open end wrench to try and remove the stub

Step 4) if above doesn't work, or if it is broken off flush with the block, then you have to do more work: center punch the stub, and use some oil for cooling and a small diameter drill bit to drill down the center of the stud (gauge the depth of one of the other holes and mark your drill bit so you know when to stop). This small diameter hole needn't be in the exact center, you just don't want to damage the soft aluminum engine while you do it.

Step 5) use a slightly larger diameter bit to enlarge the hole, and again, larger, until you just kiss the threads. At this point the stub will usually come out with a simple dental pick to turn it with.

Hint: use a slower drill speed generally cuts faster (long, curly chips is ideal). Most drills turn way too fast for drilling through 3/4" of steel like this (or whatever the length of the stub is). 100 or 200 rpm is more than enough. Too much will overheat the bit, lose its temper and then you can't drill anything with it.

I've tried all kinds of "magic" tools and none of them work as well, or as quickly as this simple technique an old mechanic taught me many years ago.

It is pretty easy, and works great, once you've tried it.
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post #3 of 6 Old 05-18-2019, 07:17 AM
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If you are handy with a TIG or a MIG welder, another option is to lay a nut on top of the stub, weld a small puddle of weld in the hole which bonds the nut to the end of the stud and it heats the stub very selectively without melting the aluminum around it.

As the stub cools (it was expanded slightly by the heat of the welding), it will loosen from its grave, and the nut provides purchase for a wrench to unscrew it.

The above drilling solution anyone can do with common tools. This one is for folks comfortable with welding (bonus points).


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post #4 of 6 Old 05-18-2019, 07:43 PM
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If you have to drill it out, and you have a reversible drill, then see if you can find a place that sells Left Hand drill bits.

The reason is that they turn counter clockwise to drill the hole. Any time you drill any metal at some point the drill bit will grab the metal and bind up. You have to back off and re-start.

Drilling with a regular Right Hand drill bit will tighten the bolt more if it catches. But if you use a Left Hand drill bit, and it catches, it might back the bolt right out.

Give it a try, you might be surprised at the results.

.

2000 Camry LE 6-cyl, 77,000 - 230,000, traded it for a
2001 Camry XLE, 6-cyl, 87,000 - 165,000 and counting.
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post #5 of 6 Old 05-18-2019, 07:55 PM
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The welding is by far my preferred method. Had one with extractor already broken off by previous owner. The weld removed the extractor easily. Then the broken bolt. The heat loosens things, the weld gives a means to grasp it.
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post #6 of 6 Old 05-24-2019, 04:24 AM
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AFter doing the starter on our GS400, we broke one bolt off (vsv valve, in to intake manifold), and found another broken previously (air resonator, in to valve cover). Both were steel screws, in an aluminum boss, flush break. Our preferred method is soaking with Kano Aerokroil, then drilling the center of the screw, starting with 1/8", then working up to the diameter of the thread. Then our $9 screw extractor set from HF pulled them out.

We've never worried about welding on to broken studs, except with steel in steel. With steel in aluminum, Kano, time, drilling, and a screw extractor seems to work. If you can expose some of the screw (if you remove the housing, and there's space left), soaking with a quality penetrating oil, waiting, and some visegrips might be all you need.

Last edited by sbagdon; 05-24-2019 at 04:27 AM.
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