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post #1 of 59 Old 04-05-2013, 10:18 PM Thread Starter
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DIY : Transmission Filter Change

So I finally decided to change my transmission oil, and filter after 102000 miles. What follows is my adventure. While im not as detailed as Sweeneyp, hopefully this will give you some idea of what is involved.

Im going to borrow some of Sweeneyp's photos from the other thread, as his came out alot better than mine. Sweeneyp hope you dont mind.

Before you start any of this, BEWARE, 1 of the pan bolts is behind a frame rail, and you cannot get to it with a regular socket, or a wrench!

You will need a special tool to get to it. I used this tool from Lowes





http://www.lowes.com/pd_74696-25428-...696&facetInfo=

This socket allowed me to use a 13mm closed end wrench on it to turn the pan bolt.

Here is the pan bolt in question. This socket, with a 13mm wrench just barely fits in the space, and will only allow you about an 1/8 of a turn at a time, because of the transmission mount on the other side of it. Sorry for the not so clear photo, it just wouldn't focus.



You will also have an issue with this pan bolt, but you can get a closed end 10mm wrench on it.




1. You will need to remove the lower splash pan under the engine compartment.
http://i802.photobucket.com/albums/y...ps9adfb7ea.jpg

2.Next tackle those 2 pan bolts, and get them loose. Before you do though, you will need to mark them in some way, since you cannot get a torque wrench on them upon reinstallation. I used a punch, and made a reference mark on the head of the bolt. If you look at the picture below, you will see that the pan has a raised section in the middle. This is what keeps the gasket from leaking. The mark was made in line with the raised portion of the pan. I then counted how many times I turned the bolt until I was able to remove it. Upon reassembly you will count how many times you turn it in, and then realign the mark, and you should be somewhere close to the original torque on the bolt. In the picture below, I used a white line to represent the punch mark, since it was really hard to pick up on camera.



3. Drain the pan. It will dump out a little over a gallon of fluid. Put the plug back in, and snug it.
This is all that was in the drain bolt when I took it out. It doesnt appear to be magnetic, as steel didnt stick to it.



4. I slowly went around to all the pan bolts, and loosened each one about half a turn, slowly making my way around the pan, until all of them were loose. I feel as this helps keep the pan from possibly warping, and keeps the edge flat, meaning it will seal back up later with no issues.

5. Remove all the pan bolts (total of 18), except for the one in the corner near the drain plug, and the one on that same side towards the front of the pan in the front corner.

6. Once all are removed, slowly unscrew the pan bolt in the front corner about half way out.

7. Place a drain pan directly under the drain plug, and remove that corners bolt. Once this bolt is removed, the pan will drop down a little more, and part of the pan will rest on the frame rail.

8. While holding the pan, remove the front bolt.

9. Gently tip the pan towards the back, and drain the remaining fluid out of the pan, as you slowly lower it, and angle it towards the passenger side so it will clear the frame rail on the drivers side. (Its self explanatory once your there and can see it)

10. Remove the pan.

Toyota recommends you use a threadlocker on the pan bolts. When I removed them, they appeared to have Blue Loctite on them, so Loctite 242 is what I used to reinstall them. I did have to "chase" the bolts with a die, as they were loaded up with ALOT of Loctite, and I wanted them to be clean upon reassembly. So I took a die (6mm x 1.0), and cleaned them all up. I also chased the transmission housing holes with a (6mm x 1.0) tap to also clean up those holes. Im not sure its necessary, but I did it anyway. Just the old mechanic in me!

Last edited by nov0798; 04-06-2013 at 08:36 AM.
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post #2 of 59 Old 04-05-2013, 10:26 PM Thread Starter
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Once the pan was removed, I was psyched to see just how clean it was after 100k miles on the clock.



You will see 2 magnets. I was also amazed at how little there was on the magnets.





Clean the magnets, and place them back in the same position.

Remove the gasket from the pan (just peels right off), and then clean it. Set it aside for now.

Next, remove the filter. There are 3 bolts, and they are about 3-4 inches long. They are all the same size, length, etc, so Im not sure it matters where they go back in at. Once you remove the bolts, grab the filter and gently pull, being careful not to damage the wires, as the edge of the filter sits above the wires. Upon reinstalling, torque those to 8 ft/lbs. Toyota also recommends you put ATF on the threads when installing.



Once you get the filter loose, it is going to dump about half a quart of fluid all over your hands. So protect your face from getting splashed with the fluid.

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post #3 of 59 Old 04-05-2013, 10:37 PM Thread Starter
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Once you remove the filter, make sure you also remove the oring from it. Note that the oring may still be in the valve body, or attached to the filter.



Now, when I removed the old filter, it looked to be in pretty good shape. I then inspected the new filter for any defects, and low and behold I found one. It appears that when the filter mesh (feels like felt) was crimped to the opening, it was torn in the process. Luckily I caught this, as it wouldnt have really provided any filtering capabilities if I had installed it (more on that in a moment).



So I decided to take a break for an hour or so and get something else done. When I came back, I wasnt thinking, and went ahead and installed the torn filter. I then buttoned it all back up, added fluid, and went for a drive. When I returned, my wife says, how did you repair that torn filter.

.

I had forgotten about the torn filter, and had installed it. Needless to say I was pissed, as I had now just wasted a gasket, and oring, and 5 quarts of fluid. Needless to say, I yanked that biotch back out, and Toyota has ordered me another one, which wont be here till Tueday

So when I get the new filter in hand, I will continue with how to reinstall everything, and post some more pics.

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post #4 of 59 Old 04-05-2013, 10:58 PM Thread Starter
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Ok so I was able to get all the parts today, and do this for a second time.

So once you get the new filter/strainer, and oring, place the oring into the valve body. Place a little ATF on the O-Ring so the filter assembly will slide into it. If you try to place the oring on the filter neck, it will just roll over the edge, and wont seal, even though the inlet as you can see in the photo is chamfered. Not sure what they were thinking here?



Place the filter into position and gently push the filter, rocking it ever so slightly. You are trying to push the neck of the filter into the oring. Once it gets past the oring, it will kind of snap right in, and then just sit there (Youll know it when it happens).

Next install the 3 bolts (Be sure to coat the threads with ATF), and torque to 8 ft/lbs or 96 in/lbs.





Note the wires over the top of the filter.

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post #5 of 59 Old 04-05-2013, 10:58 PM Thread Starter
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Next, grab the pan, and line up the gasket with the holes in the pan. It will only go one way so you cant mess it up.

Holding the gasket on the pan, slide the pan up into position. Once you do, use a small screwdriver or blunt object to gently slide the gasket into place, making sure all the holes line up. Take 2 bolts, and screw them in about half way, just to hold the pan in place.

Apply Loctite 242 to the bolts just as you are putting them in, and hand start the bolt, and install to about 3/4 of the way. You will want to leave the pan loose at this point, until you line up the other 17 holes. Once you install the first bolt, remove the original bolt that you used to hold the pan in place.

Continue to work your way around until you have all 18 bolts installed. Now for the one bolt that hides up behind the frame rail, well that one is going to take some ingenuity and patience to get started, as you cant get your fingers in there to turn it.

Once you have all the bolt started, simply snug them down at this point.

The bolts will need to be torques to 69 in/lbs at this point, but you dont want to torque one to the final spec then do the others. What you want to do is do a first round of torquing to about 30 in/lbs, all the way around.

Now come back and increase the torque to 50 in.lbs, and work your way around.

Next bring the bolts up to the final torque at 69 in/lbs.

Now you will have to tighten the 2 bolts that you cant get a wrench on by feel until you come up to the final torque.

I actually set my wrench to 70 in/lbs as extensions alter the torque value somewhat.

NOTE: As you start to pull down on the bolts, do it slow. The bolts will feel as if they are going to strip, but what you are feeling is the gasket compressing. Pull slow and steady, and the wrench will finally click.

Once all have been torqued, go around 2 more times, and double check each one. You will notice that you will be able to pull a few down a little more, and some will not. Continue to do this until none of them move anymore and the final torque has been reached.

Get yourself a new washer for the drain plug, and torque it to 36 ft/lbs. It will take a 10mm hex.

Your almost done!

Last edited by nov0798; 04-06-2013 at 10:27 PM.
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post #6 of 59 Old 04-05-2013, 10:58 PM Thread Starter
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Now pour 4-5 quarts into the dipstick hole, and fill the pan.

Next when looking at the front of the vehicle, the A/T cooler is on the drivers side in the front.

Remove the lower line from the cooler, and hook a hose up to it. The oil will come out of the cooler. You can let the original factory hose just hang, as nothing will come out of it.

I took a gallon milk jug, and measured off quart by quart on it with a marker.

Now with a second person, start the car. Let the gallon jug fill up about 2 quarts, then shut the engine off.

Add two quarts to the pan again, and then start the car again, draining another 2 quarts.

This will continue until approx 8 quarts has been reached.

At this point you need to be careful how much you take out, and how much you have to refill it.


I stopped at this point and filled the pan back up with another 3 quarts. This left me with 1 quart.

I checked the level when cold, and adjusted accordingly. I then went for a drive around the neighborhood until the engine was at operating temp, using a heavy foot at times to put a little heat into the tranny.

When I returned, I checked the level while hot, and found it was low (Just above the cold marks). I then added the entire oter quart, and checked again after taking it for another drive. At this point, I was just at the lower hot line on the dipstick, but it will be ok until I get another quart for it tomorrow.

So in all, I used every bit of the 12 quarts of fluid and then some (+ 5 additional on my second time around). The total time of the project (without my mishap) was around 2.5 hours.

In the near future, I plan on cutting open the original filter to see just how dirty it was, and whether or not it is worth it to replace it (Maybe Toyota does know what their doing). From the looks of it in my case, I dont think I needed to change it, (You can see how spotless the tranny was in the photos) but I would have never known the pan, and magnets were so clean without dropping the pan, so Im glad I did. I will definitely wait another 100k until I do it again, but will probably start drain and filling the fluid around every 50k.

Hope this helps some.

Thanks
Brian

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post #7 of 59 Old 04-06-2013, 12:48 AM
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Awesome DIY Thanks! Added to the DIY sticky. And no I don't mind about the pics, I post them to help anybody who can find them useful

I've had been planning on doing this in 5k at 100k miles (this and replace all 9+qts (torque converter) of the ATF)

A quick Q on the filters. Did you use the OEM one for the replacement or did you go aftermarket. I had hoped to hear it was a metal mesh filter, was the original one that felt material?

And that sucks about putting the defective filter in, that fluid/filter assembly isn't cheap. But you aren't alone, I do stupid things like that ALL the time. Last time I did the brakes, I had put the new pads on, re-installed the caliper, put the wheels on, torqued them down, and dropped the car back onto the ground when I saw the wear indicators sitting on the ground.......I was furious It looked like a NASCAR pit crew how quickly I was getting the car in the air and tires off

List of Mods ---->>> 2008 FWD Highlander Limited

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post #8 of 59 Old 04-06-2013, 08:14 AM Thread Starter
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The filter was an original Toyota part. When it comes to high dollar transmissions, I didnt want to risk another inferior part to not flow the same, etc. I did replace all 12 quarts of fluid in the system also. I will actually add that to my posts in a bit.
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post #9 of 59 Old 04-06-2013, 09:06 AM
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Thanks for the post, at 60k I intend on doing a flush and at 120k I'll do the flush and filter.
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post #10 of 59 Old 04-06-2013, 10:36 AM Thread Starter
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I was actually surprised at how well the fluid looked also at this mileage. It was still pink for the most part, obviously not as pink as the clean stuff, but it didnt smell burned either. Now I do all highway mileage for the most part, so Im sure that has some bearing on it as well. My wifes 2011 Rav4's fluid with 36k looks like mine at 102k, but she does alot of city driving, so I would expect this.
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post #11 of 59 Old 04-06-2013, 11:19 AM
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So a swivel socket wouldn't work on those hard to access bolts?


'05 4x4 DC LB SR5 (LSD & Tow Pkg), Timbrens, AAL, 5100s, 12/3/04
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post #12 of 59 Old 04-06-2013, 11:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nov0798 View Post
The filter was an original Toyota part. When it comes to high dollar transmissions, I didnt want to risk another inferior part to not flow the same, etc. I did replace all 12 quarts of fluid in the system also. I will actually add that to my posts in a bit.
Awesome, looking forward to it

EDIT: can you post how much fluid you ended up using total? It will give me a better idea of how much to get. I know specs are 9.3qts for FWD (U151E) and 9.5qts for AWD (U151F), but these things always seem to want more than required.

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Last edited by sweeneyp; 04-06-2013 at 02:21 PM.
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post #13 of 59 Old 04-06-2013, 01:08 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 05Moose View Post
So a swivel socket wouldn't work on those hard to access bolts?
NO, there is no room for it to have the proper angle.
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post #14 of 59 Old 04-06-2013, 02:01 PM
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Nice job! As we share basically the same tranny, I've also got these parts sitting on my workbench waiting for some warm weather (I might have a looong wait the way this year is shaping up!). Sorry to hear about the bum filter.

35330-08010 STRAINER ASSY, OIL 1 37.06 37.06
90080-30077 RING, O 1 2.59 2.59
35168-21011 GASKET, TRANSAXLE OI 1 9.64 9.64
90430-18008 GASKET Replaced by: 90430-A0003 2 1.15 2.30

The Sienna has at least 2, maybe 3 pan bolts blocked by the frame rail, so I purchased a mild offset boxed end wrench set to do the same trick. Hopefully these will allow me to get in there. http://www.homedepot.com/p/t/1006541...7#.UWBwQHfxn3M

Now all I need is a bunch of WS fluid. I do have some MaxLife which is of a similar weight (ultra thin...), but considering the cost of a U15 tranny, I think I'll treat her right and go get the good stuff.

A couple of other thoughts:

1) Cleaning the old threadlock off of the bolt and case holes is an essential step, otherwise you will end up way under-torqued. The added resistance from the clogged threads will totally screw the measurements. Your instincts were spot on!
2) Good trick with marking the rotation position of the bolts you cannot get to. If the gasket material is the same, you should get similar results. Alternate method is to torque one to spec that is in the open, apply force with your new wrench until is just barely moves, and then try to do the same on the hidden fastener. If you use care to grip the wrench the same, it will be reasonably close.
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post #15 of 59 Old 04-06-2013, 02:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fibber2 View Post
Now all I need is a bunch of WS fluid. I do have some MaxLife which is of a similar weight (ultra thin...), but considering the cost of a U15 tranny, I think I'll treat her right and go get the good stuff.
Yeah stick w/ the toyota ATF. They released a TSB (T-SB-0006-11) concerning it talking about use of aftermarket fluids:
Quote:
The use of Genuine Toyota ATF-WS is recommended.
• The use of additives or aftermarket fluids that are considered compatible or substitutes
may result in shift concerns and damage to the internal transmission components.
Considering its a TSB for dealer techs and not for the general public, that makes me think aftermarket fluids really aren't compatible. Its not just Toyota running their mouths to try and get consumers to buy their ATF over aftermarket.
Its expensive but why chance it

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