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Corolla 7th Generation (1993-1997) Specific discussion of the 7th generation

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post #31 of 2015 Old 07-21-2015, 09:32 AM
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First time I've seen an ad for a 7th gen. "race car." Text from the ad:

"I have a fwd 1995 Toyota Corolla 4 cylinder, 5 speed transmission. It can run extreme 4, hornet, or young guns class. It runs great. It has a solid cage, quite a few new parts, and it is race ready except for seat, and belts. I bought this car for my son to practice with while I finished his Saturn. Now that it is done. I don't need 2 cars. This car would make a perfect starter car, or young guns car. we have raced this car at Carolina speedway, and Cherokee speedway. It is a top 5 running car in extreme-4 class, and I have videos to prove it. There is nothing wrong with the engine, or transmission. We raced it the last to weeks in a row."



https://charlotte.craigslist.org/cto/5132837685.html
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post #32 of 2015 Old 07-24-2015, 05:36 PM
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We'll be taking a road trip next month, around the country more or less (friend's wedding, then visiting family). . . Debating between driving the Corolla or borrowing my Dad's F-150. The F-150 has recently had the transmission replaced, and in theory is the better choice.
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post #33 of 2015 Old 07-24-2015, 05:43 PM
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The F-150 will also kill your wallet with cost of fuel compared to the Corolla. I drove a Penske truck from Austin, TX to Mesa, AZ at ~10mpg. 1000 miles was roughly $350 in gas. I was towing my Corolla as well. But still that's a lot of cash used for gas.

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post #34 of 2015 Old 07-24-2015, 05:52 PM
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We'll be taking a road trip next month, around the country more or less (friend's wedding, then visiting family). . . Debating between driving the Corolla or borrowing my Dad's F-150. The F-150 has recently had the transmission replaced, and in theory is the better choice.
Either it'll be reliable due to the new transmission, or the new transmission has a high chance of failure soon after replacement because transmissions love to do that.
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post #35 of 2015 Old 07-24-2015, 06:13 PM
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I have a question for you guys with experience in the automotive industry. I want to apply for a job at a dealership, most people start off as a porter moving cars around. This is okay by me, what are your thoughts on this?

I'm also considering taking a course at a local community college for service advisers, it's a job I've been really considering lately as well. Seems real nice, as I have a good background in mechanical knowledge (enough to work efficiently) and good people skills/customer service experience for the last year and a half.
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post #36 of 2015 Old 07-24-2015, 07:35 PM
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Well, my Corolla only gets 24mpg highway at 70mph. . . It will get less with two suit cases, spare fluids, tools, and some food. The F-150 will get about 18mpg highway, but I will have greater range before needing to refuel. I hope the transmission doesn't fail, a rebuilt one was bought from a supposed to be good company.
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post #37 of 2015 Old 07-24-2015, 08:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Haloruler64 View Post
I have a question for you guys with experience in the automotive industry. I want to apply for a job at a dealership, most people start off as a porter moving cars around. This is okay by me, what are your thoughts on this?

I'm also considering taking a course at a local community college for service advisers, it's a job I've been really considering lately as well. Seems real nice, as I have a good background in mechanical knowledge (enough to work efficiently) and good people skills/customer service experience for the last year and a half.

Being a Service Advisor, or Service Writer/Consultant takes all these skills needed to be proficient at the job: Have a professional appearance, Be able to speak clearly, be able to listen carefully to the customer, write neatly and or type correctly, and be familiar with shop standards and procedures.

Taking a short course on service advisor skill development would be beneficial as too would be interpersonal relationship building. The service advisor job takes knowing about cars and how to accurately relay the problems in a "how, when, why, where" manner to the service technician so they can more accurately diagnose the problem. If you are able to understand a persons concern and correctly transfer their words to a work order then you should have no problem. The work order is something you should look into and how it is filled. Since you have a general knowledge of vehicles and how things are supposed to work/ perform you can be a service advisor, it doesn't necessarily mean you need to be on the same knowledge level as a service tech.

Here are some things that are written on common work orders that I am taking out of a book.

  • Recording the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) of the vehicle on the work order.
  • Recording the make, model, year, and mileage on the work order
  • Carefully recording what the customers complaint (concern) so that the service technician can verify the complaint and make the proper repair.
  • Reviewing the customer's vehicle history file and identify where additional required service
  • Keeping the customer informed as to the progress of the service work

The part where the repair should be finalized, this is where your marketing skill in selling something will become very helpful. But this is your sale point to why it needs to be addressed or the prolonged problems they may have. The work order in many of the technicians eyes is very much a legal document in some cases.. Only because if the person declines needed work and something happens to where someone may be injured because of it you need to make sure you have the proper documentation on the w.o. to verify the decline or otherwise. So good documentation is important, for you, the tech, and the dealership. But other than that I have nothing more to say but you'll be waiting around and greeting a lot. Starting out as a porter may be alright, you may want to express that you want to become a service advisor at first and see what you need to get there. Taking college courses helps, believe me. Hope this helps
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post #38 of 2015 Old 07-24-2015, 08:06 PM
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Originally Posted by VicSierraV View Post
Being a Service Advisor, or Service Writer/Consultant takes all these skills needed to be proficient at the job: Have a professional appearance, Be able to speak clearly, be able to listen carefully to the customer, write neatly and or type correctly, and be familiar with shop standards and procedures.

Taking a short course on service advisor skill development would be beneficial as too would be interpersonal relationship building. The service advisor job takes knowing about cars and how to accurately relay the problems in a "how, when, why, where" manner to the service technician so they can more accurately diagnose the problem. If you are able to understand a persons concern and correctly transfer their words to a work order then you should have no problem. The work order is something you should look into and how it is filled. Since you have a general knowledge of vehicles and how things are supposed to work/ perform you can be a service advisor, it doesn't necessarily mean you need to be on the same knowledge level as a service tech.

Here are some things that are written on common work orders that I am taking out of a book.

  • Recording the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) of the vehicle on the work order.
  • Recording the make, model, year, and mileage on the work order
  • Carefully recording what the customers complaint (concern) so that the service technician can verify the complaint and make the proper repair.
  • Reviewing the customer's vehicle history file and identify where additional required service
  • Keeping the customer informed as to the progress of the service work

The part where the repair should be finalized, this is where your marketing skill in selling something will become very helpful. But this is your sale point to why it needs to be addressed or the prolonged problems they may have. The work order in many of the technicians eyes is very much a legal document in some cases.. Only because if the person declines needed work and something happens to where someone may be injured because of it you need to make sure you have the proper documentation on the w.o. to verify the decline or otherwise. So good documentation is important, for you, the tech, and the dealership. But other than that I have nothing more to say but you'll be waiting around and greeting a lot. Starting out as a porter may be alright, you may want to express that you want to become a service advisor at first and see what you need to get there. Taking college courses helps, believe me. Hope this helps
Thank you! I think I'm well suited for the job honestly. So you seem to have a decently positive view on the job?
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post #39 of 2015 Old 07-24-2015, 08:11 PM
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Thank you! I think I'm well suited for the job honestly. So you seem to have a decently positive view on the job?
Yes, I do. Being a good service writer is needed in a dealership. It's a good respectful position in the shop environment and in customer satisfaction, service techs will all be your friend if you are good at it. Plus parts are cheaper for you to buy straight from the dealership.

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post #40 of 2015 Old 07-24-2015, 08:12 PM
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Shieeet now my mind is pretty much set. Thanks again!
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post #41 of 2015 Old 07-28-2015, 04:04 PM
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Wow, someone sticky-ed this? Cool!

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post #42 of 2015 Old 07-28-2015, 06:10 PM Thread Starter
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Halo - back to your dealership question: Consider also taking a value proposition to them - something that makes you different.

For example: Do they have an online parts store (like toyotapartsdeal.com etc)? If not, it looks like all those parts websites run off one or two centralized merchant systems. Do some research, find out how they work, and propose to your local dealer that if they hire you, you will not only do the job they hired you for but also:

a) Help them into the age of digital sales and establish a nice secondary revenue stream
b) Through your connections as a moderator and participant at TN - hook them up as a supporting vendor and channel a bunch of parts sales their way through your network
c) Be their online ambassador on forums like TN

Bring them some statistics - show them the total user base of TN (market potential), show them how a lot of online parts sales are made by forum members and words of mouth.

Or if you have another idea of your own - show them that you think creatively and would be an awesome asset to their team. Of course, weigh it appropriately as an extracurricular, you also need to solidly demonstrate you're capable of the primary job they're looking for you to fill. And make sure it's something they have a certain market need for. Don't make it too niche - our 7th gen Corolla forum is a very narrow niche for example, and we're a dying breed - or at least our cars are. Pick something more on the up-climb of the trend curve.

Your average Joe will just be satisfied to have a steady job where they don't have to think much once they've learned how to handle the ropes. You want to catch their attention by combining a) the ability to do what average Joe is doing but better than average Joe - with b) the ability to think about growing and supporting their business.

EDIT: Caveat: Know your audience. If you're speaking with a supervisor or low level Manager you need to look for clues if they feel threatened by your creativeness. If you're speaking with the owner or higher level management they'd be more likely to embrace it.
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post #43 of 2015 Old 07-29-2015, 01:57 AM
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Thanks 94RollaDad, I have to keep all this in mind when putting together a plan. Daunting but exciting!
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post #44 of 2015 Old 07-29-2015, 10:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haloruler64 View Post
I have a question for you guys with experience in the automotive industry. I want to apply for a job at a dealership, most people start off as a porter moving cars around. This is okay by me, what are your thoughts on this?

I'm also considering taking a course at a local community college for service advisers, it's a job I've been really considering lately as well. Seems real nice, as I have a good background in mechanical knowledge (enough to work efficiently) and good people skills/customer service experience for the last year and a half.
Something else is an auto auction driver. The local Manheim is probably hiring. They don't pay jack crap but the benefits are pretty good, they're typically easy to work with, and it's a fun job. Typically transporters can be dealer or wholesaler, and pay better than auction work, but are harder to get and typically looking for older guys and people with prior experience. A parts store driver is another option though be ready to sell parts at times too and I also think it's real low paying but it's easier to get into than a transporter job.

I also agree dealers are looking for younger, tech/social media savvy people. I got scouted for this position by a sales person at a local dealer, applied, but got passed over as I have no sales experience. Wound up being a blessing as I worked a job I LOVED at a camera store that summer with people I enjoyed though.

I do feel in both roles being younger has a credibility issue so make sure you dress nice and present well. Talking formally and carefully is the big one too. The guy I bought my Camry from was my age but came across professionally and that is probably why he had the job. Like it or not people are hesitant to trust cars to a 23 year old, but if you have a great personality and conduct yourself well (I suspect you'd have no problem with this) you'll get the sales, this is why my friend does really well selling phones.

As for a community college, my advice is if you go for something with a wide value, that will transfer credits, and can be put towards a bachelor's or masters. A few courses on something for a service writer is fine of course but that's about all you can do with it and most of those career courses won't transfer. Any kind of engineering or engineering tech is great for this, but do research on the difference; too great to go into here, but tech generally is more hands on, engineering is more theory and both work at different parts of a product design process, though there is a lot of overlap. At least take some courses, it'll have a lot more long run value if you want to change careers down the road, but if you do go for 4 years (bank on it taking 5) and do what you can at a CC (2-3 years) to save money. FWIW I went MET, hands on problem solving is my thing.
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post #45 of 2015 Old 08-02-2015, 05:21 AM
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You could always get a CDL, and buy a dump truck.

You'll just need a set of larger tools, and a forklift or end loader instead of the typical engine hoist. Just like with a pizza car, you keep more money doing the repairs yourself...

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