300,000 mile Corolla or Matrix my owners manual additions - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car and Truck Forums
Corolla 9th Gen/1st Gen Matrix (2003-2008) 9th generation Corolla and 1st generation Matrix discussion.

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post #1 of 16 Old 05-08-2019, 10:09 AM Thread Starter
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300,000 mile Corolla or Matrix my owners manual additions

1 Let's start with driving habits. Avoiding hard braking when possible, avoiding jack rabbit starts when possible, avoiding potholes when possible. Also watch your RPM although the tachometer goes to 7 or 9 thousand RPM'S 4000 is my limit and that's entering an interstate. 95% of my driving is done between 1800 and 3000 RPM great for economy and engine life. Boring yes but 300,000 miles on your car with less then one thousand dollars in additional maintenance is like getting a BOGO Car. (buy one get one free) You can go to an amusement park if you want a thrill ride.

1a Oil and filter changes at 4,000 miles never more will keep you car on the 300,000 mile longevity track. A little more conservative then Toyota's recommendations, However this is a case of hundreds saving you thousands in the long run. If your doing lots of short trips in the city or your car doing less then 500 miles a month I would seriously consider 3,000 mile oil and oil filter changes. The 3,000 mile oil change practice will result in no oil spots on the garage or the driveway and a 300,000 engine just for changing oil more frequently (that's right).(Gaskets even last longer with more frequent oil changes) I owned and drove Tractor Trailers and million million engines and drive trains are common place it's all about oil changes.

1b Tire air pressure check it once a month. Tire longevity and safety come into play here and over a lifetime it will pay off greatly. Most cars have sensors keeping watch on tire pressure for you. Some tire warnings will not reset or clear even after the tires are properly inflated. In that case look for low tire inflation warning reset in the car manual. Sometimes you will find the reset in the the glove box others require series of key turns and button presses. Check the forum and ask the question or go to you-tube lots of people have had the same problem and posted the answer on line. Tire pressures for your car are posted on the right side of the drivers doorway when you open the drivers door.


2 Buy a good service manual that covers your make and model car and familiarize yourself with both the book and the car. Think of the book as an extended owners manual. You will find manuals if your on a budget all over the net.


3 Tightening all grounds on your car. The car can be 10 years old but if you just made the purchase it's new to you. Find them in your service manual and get tightening.


4 Re-seat all fuses and relays in the numerous locations which again you will find in your newly purchased service manual. I have a computer, electronic, electricity background both theoretical and hands on. Most electrical troubles begin with loose or oxidized connections. The unseen action of the relays being activated and deactivated causes a problem called "creep" in which a relay or a fuse works it's way loose from it original secure connection. Simply press each fuse or relay down to re-seat them individually. You will be surprised at the number of loose ones you find in each panels (take 5 minutes once or twice a year and pop them all beck into place).


5 Be careful using a high pressure water wand to clean the car they can damage the paint job. Most of those roofs and hoods that have rust and clear coat damage could have been avoided by following the manufactures recommendations on wash and wax procedures. Be especially careful with high pressure wands in the engine compartments to all those electronic sensors water means trouble. I never spray my engine with water.


6 Inspect the plastic covers and replace the missing plastic push pin rivet style fasteners surrounding your cars engine, fenders where necessary. Those covers surrounding the engine being held in by these fasteners protect components from heat, rust, dirt, rain, foreign road objects and more. These push pins fall out they are cheap replace so do it before unnecessary damage occurs. With my latest purchase of a new car after pulling the protective cover above the engine I found what looked like a rodent nest nestled into the space between the intake manifold inlets of two cylinders. That was a first and I'm glad I caught it. This lead to an interesting read on car wiring harness insulation partiality composed of soy. Read about the famous car made of soy on the Internet.


7 Checking tightness. Same new car mentioned above gave me a clunk sound backing out of the driveway when the car was days old. Lucky for me I heard it and I am a curious kind of guy. I have driven for a living many years professionally and knew that clunk. It was loose lug nuts on the front left wheel. Which brings me to checking tightness. This is something I do routinely on a new purchase whether its brand new, 10 year old, car or semi truck and trailer. You will be surprised at the things you will find. The inspection is worth the effort.

8 Change the fluids a 30,000. As in transmission, cooling system, brake fluid and power steering fluid. Some manufactures recommend the same thing in their maintenance interval some don't. I find by using this practice I never had a car or truck overheat, never spin a bearing or have any kind of transmission problem. That goes for brake fluid as well. The few dollars in additional cost provides thousands of dollars in returned savings.


9 Change all your bulbs on the cars eight birthday. Next time you are out for a drive pay attention to to number of lights burned out in cars you are driving by or following. It's money well spent not having to ever think about lights. Stick with the incandescent bulbs and manufacturers recommendations on an older car because they last a long time and they are inexpensive. With the computers of todays cars and even in the older models (it is best not redesign your cars electrical system) adding 3 party led lighting unnecessarily.


10 Buy a cheap obd2 code reader. This tool will allow you to make accurate assessments of engine warning lights and put these emergencies in their proper prospective. That service manual I mentioned earlier will then become the reference which can turn a $1500 repair into a $50 repair you do yourself. These readers can be found for very little money on the Internet. If you are in a pinch places like Advanced auto or Auto zone will read your engine's trouble codes in an emergency free.


10a Here is a summary of my current cars repairs over 15 years. I have had similar results with other cars in my life which have resulted in numerous car BOGO'S.

My current car was bought new and always serviced by myself. 3000 mile oil and filter changes. 30,000 mile manual transmission oil changes and antifreeze changes were also preformed. Air Cleaner filters were changed once a year @ (15,000 miles). The car is a Florida car so lucky for me no rust. I changed the struts front and rear at 200,000 and both the VVT solenoid and it's separate filter at the same time. After having changed those items the car ran and felt like new again. Three more items I changed which were important and inexpensive were: the valve cover gasket (while putting in the second set of plugs at 200,000 plus miles), the oil pan gasket at 150,000 (oil light flickered and the strainer in the pan was partially clogged). The A/C clutch relay was changed and the A/C system now has 4,000 plus Florida hours and never a failure. If you are a D.I.Y. person these Corolla's can be more then budget friendly. Same clutch at 230,000 plus miles but I drive as if I had an egg between my feet and the pedals. (If you break the egg you have a lot to learn about safe driving). Alternator and starter were also changed at 200,000 miles just as a preventive maintenance measure as was the water pump. All told the cost of (additional) maintenance over the years has been less then the tax that would been added to a new car so I have been fortunate. The interior is still close to new looking due to regular cleaning. If I had to do it over again I would have taken better care of the exterior paint by waxing the car more often but the car just turned 16 so I can't complain about fading


Remember these are simple preventive maintenance techniques I use on my Corolla's and have been very profitable for me over a lifetime, not recommendations, they may not be for everyone. You also have to read manuals both operator and service to advance your skill level in both repair and safety techniques as part of your own training in what I call my hobby. Good luck
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post #2 of 16 Old 05-08-2019, 12:21 PM
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What is a VVT solenoid ? Does this require taking off the top of the engine block ? I've done routine maintenance, and the corolla is the longest one that I have had last. Others have either been destroyed from wrecks, someone hitting them, so at 140k I'm looking to at least hit 200k. Most cars I have seen assuming basic routine maintenance is done, are a byproduct of lots of highway mileage. I know several people who have in excess of 200-250k vehicles, but every one of them has generated all those miles over the highway vs. city driving. Likewise, majority of car maintenance is either changing fluids or a filter. I did go through and replace a bunch of plastic clips that did come out. I was surprised to see the number of them missing. I always assumed the shop stole them, but maybe they have broken off as well.
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post #3 of 16 Old 05-08-2019, 01:16 PM Thread Starter
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VVT solenoid, oil control filter inspection and or replacement.

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Originally Posted by alexj44321 View Post
What is a VVT solenoid ? Does this require taking off the top of the engine block ? I've done routine maintenance, and the corolla is the longest one that I have had last. Others have either been destroyed from wrecks, someone hitting them, so at 140k I'm looking to at least hit 200k. Most cars I have seen assuming basic routine maintenance is done, are a byproduct of lots of highway mileage. I know several people who have in excess of 200-250k vehicles, but every one of them has generated all those miles over the highway vs. city driving. Likewise, majority of car maintenance is either changing fluids or a filter. I did go through and replace a bunch of plastic clips that did come out. I was surprised to see the number of them missing. I always assumed the shop stole them, but maybe they have broken off as well.


Alex,

The VVT solenoid controls your valves for both economy and power. is the short answer. The solenoid is located on the engine head just above the alternator. Just below the solenoid is a bolt which houses the oil control filter. This stuff is all about oil and filter changes so if you or the previous owner fudged on your maintenance (oil and filter changes) you probably have a dirty oil control filter which protects the solenoid.

Here's how it went for me at 200,000 miles when I discovered they existed.

My 2004 Corolla VVT solenoid had an oil leak. This item should be a Toyota maintenance item because the oil leak at this point is pretty common. A problem arose when the vvt solenoid cylinder broke off inside the head during removal because the cylinder was seized in the head. The fix was penetrating oil an easy-out in the broken cylinder with vice-grips securely attached and a 24"roll-head pry-bar to ease the broken cylinder out of the head using the pry-bar to force a lot of pressure on the vice grips which got the cylinder out . For what it's worth that's how it went. The bottom line is the car has 200,000 plus miles on it and changing this solenoid and it's filter made quite a difference resulting in higher mileage a performance increase and the elimination of numerous engine noises at a minimum cost. The point is this should be a maintenance item at 100,000 miles where the vvt solenoid and it's separate filter (the 14mm bolt under the solenoid hides the filter in the head) are checked and an o-ring could be simply changed at that point stopping an eventual oil leak before the assembly heat seizes itself to the head making for a lot of extra work. As a caveat the above mentioned filter was also pretty gummed up and stuck in the head. I ended up forcing a drywall screw into it (being plastic and less then the size of a thimble) so I then had a handle to forcibly pull it out. So for all you guys who maintain your own cars this solenoid is in most makes and model cars. If you catch it early before it heat seizes itself into the head or the filter gums itself to it's housing, it will be a problem avoided. Good luck.

The (oil control filter) OEM can be bought via Toyota about $10.00's. Solenoids condition can be judged after the (oil control filter) is cleaned and inspected. Filters are harder to find that's why I suggested Toyota as a source. The solenoid's are plentiful all over the net. If your not a hands on guy you want a experienced person to do it or at least help. Both jobs are a total of 15 minutes but there is a good chance of breaking either or both parts during removal because of heat seizure. That's why I say inspect, clean or replace the filter first. If it looks like new coming out your good for another 100,000 miles Good luck.
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post #4 of 16 Old 05-16-2019, 01:36 PM
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I love reading high mileage toyota threads. That's the reason i bought my matrix. I bought it at 156xxx. Drives like a brand new car to me. Need to change the motor mounts as it buzzes with the ac on at idle. Other than that its great. That's probably because I used to daily my 93 wrangler before this car. Loving it so far.
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Just about 374K miles on my 2004 Corolla. I have never had to do anything with the VVT solenoid or the little filter for it. My wife's 2006 Hyundai Elantra has had the check engine light twice for that over the years, which was resolved by cleaning that little VVT solenoid filter the first time and replacing the filter some years later the second time. For whatever reason I haven't had to mess with it on the Corolla. The only thing I can think of is that I am running an oversized oil filter on the Corolla engine and am also using a huge bypass filter at the same time, so I have a lot of filtration going on and that could be the reason.

.



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Quote:
Originally Posted by ftmanglona View Post
I love reading high mileage toyota threads. That's the reason i bought my matrix. I bought it at 156xxx. Drives like a brand new car to me. Need to change the motor mounts as it buzzes with the ac on at idle. Other than that its great. That's probably because I used to daily my 93 wrangler before this car. Loving it so far.
Actually, I also hear this as well. It's like a buzzing at idle at a light and I never knew what it was. So this is a motor mount issue ? I hear it coming only from one side. I always thought it was loose plastic dash
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Originally Posted by John Anthony View Post
Just about 374K miles on my 2004 Corolla. I have never had to do anything with the VVT solenoid or the little filter for it. My wife's 2006 Hyundai Elantra has had the check engine light twice for that over the years, which was resolved by cleaning that little VVT solenoid filter the first time and replacing the filter some years later the second time. For whatever reason I haven't had to mess with it on the Corolla. The only thing I can think of is that I am running an oversized oil filter on the Corolla engine and am also using a huge bypass filter at the same time, so I have a lot of filtration going on and that could be the reason.
What oil filter are you using ? It's an oversized one with 2 separate media ?
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What oil filter are you using ? It's an oversized one with 2 separate media ?
No, I'm running two oil filters on this Corolla. The oversized filter goes in place of the regular small stock filter, and I have a large bypass filter mounted under the battery.

The oversized filter that goes in place of the regular small filter can be whatever brand you want. Here are some:

Wix: 51516
Mobil 1: M1-103A
Royal Purple: 20-400
Amsoil: EaO34
Fram Ultra: XG3600

The bypass filter is:

Amsoil: EaBP-90



Here is a top view of those three filters:



Here's the setup starting with the oversized filter in the normal location along with a T-connector at the oil pressure sensor that has a hose connected to it:



The bypass filter spins onto a mounting plate/adapter, which is secured to a bracket that is secured to the body of the car under the battery:



Here is the same photo zoomed out:



This photo shows the hose from the bypass filter supplying filtered oil back to the engine:


.



2004 Corolla LE 374K+ miles.
1987 Toyota Pickup base, 4spd 162K+ miles.



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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexj44321 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by ftmanglona View Post
I love reading high mileage toyota threads. That's the reason i bought my matrix. I bought it at 156xxx. Drives like a brand new car to me. Need to change the motor mounts as it buzzes with the ac on at idle. Other than that its great. That's probably because I used to daily my 93 wrangler before this car. Loving it so far.
Actually, I also hear this as well. It's like a buzzing at idle at a light and I never knew what it was. So this is a motor mount issue ? I hear it coming only from one side. I always thought it was loose plastic dash
It's more than likely the motor mount since it's a rubber bushing. When it dries out and cracks it does not isolate the vibration.
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Originally Posted by John Anthony View Post
Just about 374K miles on my 2004 Corolla. I have never had to do anything with the VVT solenoid or the little filter for it. My wife's 2006 Hyundai Elantra has had the check engine light twice for that over the years, which was resolved by cleaning that little VVT solenoid filter the first time and replacing the filter some years later the second time. For whatever reason I haven't had to mess with it on the Corolla. The only thing I can think of is that I am running an oversized oil filter on the Corolla engine and am also using a huge bypass filter at the same time, so I have a lot of filtration going on and that could be the reason.
I've had 3 Corolla Gen9 and essentially do the minimum requirements as stated in owners manual except I use syn oil, oversized filter and change oil every 10,000miles.
200,000 - 300,000 - 400,000 miles. Gen9 Corollas don't need to be pampered lol
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How about flashing engine?

05 Matrix, 05 Solara, 01 Sequoia 4x4 Limited

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How about flashing engine?
Might cause an accident....
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Good job on the bypass filter

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Anthony View Post
Just about 374K miles on my 2004 Corolla. I have never had to do anything with the VVT solenoid or the little filter for it. My wife's 2006 Hyundai Elantra has had the check engine light twice for that over the years, which was resolved by cleaning that little VVT solenoid filter the first time and replacing the filter some years later the second time. For whatever reason I haven't had to mess with it on the Corolla. The only thing I can think of is that I am running an oversized oil filter on the Corolla engine and am also using a huge bypass filter at the same time, so I have a lot of filtration going on and that could be the reason.
Good job on the bypass filter John. I was a steel hauler in a past life and that's how big trucks do a million plus miles. Never set one up in my 2004 Corolla but now that you mentioned it I will do it in my 2015 Corolla.
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Photo (Oil Control Filter) and VVT Cylinder (Worth Checking) See bottom of Post.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran Grysko View Post
1 Let's start with driving habits. Avoiding hard braking when possible, avoiding jack rabbit starts when possible, avoiding potholes when possible. Also watch your RPM although the tachometer goes to 7 or 9 thousand RPM'S 4000 is my limit and that's entering an interstate. 95% of my driving is done between 1800 and 3000 RPM great for economy and engine life. Boring yes but 300,000 miles on your car with less then one thousand dollars in additional maintenance is like getting a BOGO Car. (buy one get one free) You can go to an amusement park if you want a thrill ride.

1a Oil and filter changes at 4,000 miles never more will keep you car on the 300,000 mile longevity track. A little more conservative then Toyota's recommendations, However this is a case of hundreds saving you thousands in the long run. If your doing lots of short trips in the city or your car doing less then 500 miles a month I would seriously consider 3,000 mile oil and oil filter changes. The 3,000 mile oil change practice will result in no oil spots on the garage or the driveway and a 300,000 engine just for changing oil more frequently (that's right).(Gaskets even last longer with more frequent oil changes) I owned and drove Tractor Trailers and million million engines and drive trains are common place it's all about oil changes.

1b Tire air pressure check it once a month. Tire longevity and safety come into play here and over a lifetime it will pay off greatly. Most cars have sensors keeping watch on tire pressure for you. Some tire warnings will not reset or clear even after the tires are properly inflated. In that case look for low tire inflation warning reset in the car manual. Sometimes you will find the reset in the the glove box others require series of key turns and button presses. Check the forum and ask the question or go to you-tube lots of people have had the same problem and posted the answer on line. Tire pressures for your car are posted on the right side of the drivers doorway when you open the drivers door.


2 Buy a good service manual that covers your make and model car and familiarize yourself with both the book and the car. Think of the book as an extended owners manual. You will find manuals if your on a budget all over the net.


3 Tightening all grounds on your car. The car can be 10 years old but if you just made the purchase it's new to you. Find them in your service manual and get tightening.


4 Re-seat all fuses and relays in the numerous locations which again you will find in your newly purchased service manual. I have a computer, electronic, electricity background both theoretical and hands on. Most electrical troubles begin with loose or oxidized connections. The unseen action of the relays being activated and deactivated causes a problem called "creep" in which a relay or a fuse works it's way loose from it original secure connection. Simply press each fuse or relay down to re-seat them individually. You will be surprised at the number of loose ones you find in each panels (take 5 minutes once or twice a year and pop them all beck into place).


5 Be careful using a high pressure water wand to clean the car they can damage the paint job. Most of those roofs and hoods that have rust and clear coat damage could have been avoided by following the manufactures recommendations on wash and wax procedures. Be especially careful with high pressure wands in the engine compartments to all those electronic sensors water means trouble. I never spray my engine with water.


6 Inspect the plastic covers and replace the missing plastic push pin rivet style fasteners surrounding your cars engine, fenders where necessary. Those covers surrounding the engine being held in by these fasteners protect components from heat, rust, dirt, rain, foreign road objects and more. These push pins fall out they are cheap replace so do it before unnecessary damage occurs. With my latest purchase of a new car after pulling the protective cover above the engine I found what looked like a rodent nest nestled into the space between the intake manifold inlets of two cylinders. That was a first and I'm glad I caught it. This lead to an interesting read on car wiring harness insulation partiality composed of soy. Read about the famous car made of soy on the Internet.


7 Checking tightness. Same new car mentioned above gave me a clunk sound backing out of the driveway when the car was days old. Lucky for me I heard it and I am a curious kind of guy. I have driven for a living many years professionally and knew that clunk. It was loose lug nuts on the front left wheel. Which brings me to checking tightness. This is something I do routinely on a new purchase whether its brand new, 10 year old, car or semi truck and trailer. You will be surprised at the things you will find. The inspection is worth the effort.

8 Change the fluids a 30,000. As in transmission, cooling system, brake fluid and power steering fluid. Some manufactures recommend the same thing in their maintenance interval some don't. I find by using this practice I never had a car or truck overheat, never spin a bearing or have any kind of transmission problem. That goes for brake fluid as well. The few dollars in additional cost provides thousands of dollars in returned savings.


9 Change all your bulbs on the cars eight birthday. Next time you are out for a drive pay attention to to number of lights burned out in cars you are driving by or following. It's money well spent not having to ever think about lights. Stick with the incandescent bulbs and manufacturers recommendations on an older car because they last a long time and they are inexpensive. With the computers of today's cars and even in the older models (it is best not redesign your cars electrical system) adding 3 party led lighting unnecessarily.


10 Buy a cheap obd2 code reader. This tool will allow you to make accurate assessments of engine warning lights and put these emergencies in their proper prospective. That service manual I mentioned earlier will then become the reference which can turn a $1500 repair into a $50 repair you do yourself. These readers can be found for very little money on the Internet. If you are in a pinch places like Advanced auto or Auto zone will read your engine's trouble codes in an emergency free.


10a Here is a summary of my current cars repairs over 15 years. I have had similar results with other cars in my life which have resulted in numerous car BOGO'S.

My current car was bought new and always serviced by myself. 3000 mile oil and filter changes. 30,000 mile manual transmission oil changes and antifreeze changes were also preformed. Air Cleaner filters were changed once a year @ (15,000 miles). The car is a Florida car so lucky for me no rust. I changed the struts front and rear at 200,000 and both the VVT solenoid and it's separate filter at the same time. After having changed those items the car ran and felt like new again. Three more items I changed which were important and inexpensive were: the valve cover gasket (while putting in the second set of plugs at 200,000 plus miles), the oil pan gasket at 150,000 (oil light flickered and the strainer in the pan was partially clogged). The A/C clutch relay was changed and the A/C system now has 4,000 plus Florida hours and never a failure. If you are a D.I.Y. person these Corolla's can be more then budget friendly. Same clutch at 230,000 plus miles but I drive as if I had an egg between my feet and the pedals. (If you break the egg you have a lot to learn about safe driving). Alternator and starter were also changed at 200,000 miles just as a preventive maintenance measure as was the water pump. All told the cost of (additional) maintenance over the years has been less then the tax that would been added to a new car so I have been fortunate. The interior is still close to new looking due to regular cleaning. If I had to do it over again I would have taken better care of the exterior paint by waxing the car more often but the car just turned 16 so I can't complain about fading


Remember these are simple preventive maintenance techniques I use on my Corolla's and have been very profitable for me over a lifetime, not recommendations, they may not be for everyone. You also have to read manuals both operator and service to advance your skill level in both repair and safety techniques as part of your own training in what I call my hobby. Good luck



The Photo's are of the VVT cylinder and oil control filter which are worth inspecting if your car has over 100,000 miles.
I did the close up because I want you to think of of engine oil with 5000 miles or more, then envision that dirty oil trying to get thru that tiny oil control filter and do its job. Changing or cleaning that filter makes a host of problems go away. The VVT solenoid had broken off the VVT cylinder. The cylinder then had to be taken out of the head with an easy out because it was heat seized into the head. As stated earlier after the VVT solenoid and the oil control filter were changed the car ran like new again. The drywall screw in photo was used to penetrate and force-ably remove filter which was also seized in engine head after 200,000 miles.
Attached Images
File Type: jpeg vvt and oil control filter2.JPEG (473.3 KB, 15 views)
File Type: jpg vvt filter close_up 1.JPG (507.5 KB, 17 views)
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