DIY Change Cable Shifter Bushings (Manual Transmission) - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car and Truck Forums
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post #1 of 20 Old 12-13-2013, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
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DIY Change Cable Shifter Bushings (Manual Transmission)

This is the second part of the solid shifter-bushing install.

First Part for the shifter base is here:

https://www.toyotanation.com/forum/13...nsmission.html


Notes: These are from *** Performance (which I’ll continuously plug) and fit all years and trims of the 9th Gen Corolla with a manual transmission. Today I will be installing them on my 2005 Corolla XRS with the 6-speed manual (still stock: not with a short shifter). They will however work on the 5-speed as well. *These are not applicable to an automatic transmission.

http://www.***performance.com/bushin...ushing-kit.php


You may also use this guide if you’re simply renewing the rubber shifter bushings.

User Warning: This job has the potential to injure you, and cause damage to your property in the event of improper installation. Use your personal discression when taking on this task. If you do not feel comfortable performing the task: DON'T. I am not responsible for any incidents or accidents to you, or the damage or malfunction of your property. I trust you will make safe choices if you choose to perform this task. This is a guide to help you and not a repair manual.

From the *** FAQ:
Quote:
Originally Posted by *** Performance
Cable bushings and Base bushings explained!
Truth be told, there is a lot more that goes into making the perfect shift assembly than the average consumer may believe. Most people suppose that once you throw in a short shifter and a nice heavy shift knob, you’ve exhausted all of the possibilities to improve upon your shift feel. This is simply not true, and it is even more so when dealing with your typical, modern cable actuated shifter. Cable actuated shifters often feel more spongy or vague than their rod shifter counterpart simply because of their complexity. In a cable actuated shifter, there are multiple points between the shift knob and the shift actuator on the transmission where large rubber bushings are used and often offer generous amounts of flex. This flex is transmitted directly to the shifter as a sloppy vague feel.
So now the question persists, what can I do to improve upon this vague feeling past your typical short shifter and shift knob modification? The answer comes in the form of superior bushings; both on the base of the in-car shifter assembly, and directly where the linkage meets with the transmission. We’re often asked what the differences are between *** Performance Base Bushings and Cable Bushings so we’ll try to take an in-depth look at their different purposes and designs in this article.
- Base Bushings (The best bang, for your buck!)
It should be noted that for every cable actuated shifter, we offer base bushings! Essentially, our base bushings are precise CNC machined aluminum bushings that replace the soft and flexible OEM bushings that attach the shifter assembly to the floor of the vehicle. The result is a completely differ shift feel. Due to the fact that aluminum won't flex like rubber, your shifter will feel much more solid and precise.
The most noticeable difference after installing *** Performance base bushings is the definition of the "H" pattern. What I am referring to here is the gates in the shifter. With this added feel and gate definition, locating and selecting gears is easier than ever before.
- Cable Bushings (Metal alloys at work!)
Once one side of the shift assembly has been taken care of with the base bushings, it’s time to move onto the other side to where the cables connect to the transmission. Many cable actuated shifters have bushings that connect the cables to the transmission shift lever. This is our final point of interest with our shifter overhaul.
By nature, many of these soft rubber cable bushings are in a housing that must pivot and rotate with the cable. Therefore we had to find a material that would allow for this rotation without causing friction resistance and possible binding, while being hard enough to remove the flex and play that is inherent with the OEM rubber bushings. What we came up with was our Bronzoil metal alloy.
Bronzoil is hard enough to eliminate all play, slack, and flex in the cable linkage, while having “lubricating” properties to prevent all of the potential negative effects that were mentioned above. While it is not mandatory to use the Base Bushings in conjunction with the Cable bushings, the combination is a recipe for a solid feeling shifter, and more precise, gated shifts each and every time.
Thanks for taking the time to read this, and as always, if you have any other questions or concerns, feel free to let us know!
Frank
Team *** Performance


Time: Cable Bushings 45min

Cost: Check with *** or other supplier.

Tools: *** said 10mm ratchet, Needle nose pliers, Flashlight. For the C59


I used: 21mm socket + ratchet with extension bar, 76ft-lb torque wrench, jack and jack stand, flashlight, solvent cleaner, rag, needle nose pliers. For the C60


Part supplied by ***:
2 Bronzoil shifter base bushings
2 C-clips
2 Cotter Pins
1 very small piece of 100 grit sand paper
Installation manual using a Celica GT



Note: If you are working on the C60 (Celica GT-S and XRS models) the instruction guide is “no good” as it is for a Celica GT which the C56 transmission has the bushings under the throttle body and the battery tray (front of the vehicle). The C60 that I’m working on has them beneath the brake reservoir/master cylinder (towards the firewall). The best access with the minimal amount of work is to go through the drivers’ side well with the wheel off. I found this to be a better than removing the air box and the throttle cable transfer box and working from up top. There is decent access and the bushings are quite close. Here is the video I did before I got the parts to see what I mean. Sorry for the poor quality.




The result is: I am working on the C60 so this probably won’t apply to you directly if you have the C59. However it is similar, just the cables terminate in a different location.

Begin:
Look at the instruction guide for the C56 and determine that it’s not really applicable to the C60 and don’t look at it again.

With your car on hard level ground, set the e-brake and put the car in 1st gear.

With the car still on the ground loosen all the lug nuts on the front driver side tire. You will need a 21mm socket with preferably a breaker bar or a ratchet extension for extra torque (lug nuts should be tight), or pneumatic gun. I used a 2.5ft metal pipe on a standard ratchet. If you have alloys you will need the key for the lock lug nut, the lock key accepts a 21mm socket.

Pic of the alloy wheel lock key on the alloy wheel lug lock







pic of the 21mm socket/ratchet with 2.5ft extension







With the lug nuts on one side of the car loosened jack the front up on the side you’re working on; I used the drivers’ side jack insert just aft of the front tire, and support the jack with a jack stand right next to it. Give the tire (in the air) a good shove to make sure the car is sturdy on the stand (so the car doesn't fall on you while you’re working underneath). Lower the jack with the car safely supported on one jackstand.







Note: Never work under a car that is only supported by a jack (always work with jack stands). Although unlikely, jacks can fail. There’s a good possibility that you will be seriously injured if the jack fails while you’re under the car.

Remove the wheel you will see this:



You will be working through there, and there is enough room to work. You can even see part of the transmission in the picture.

This is a bit messy because I put a bit of grease but it’s a really simple replacement.



Take the needle nose pliers and remove the cotter pin that secures the washer and bushing to the transmission control arms. One is on top and the other is on the side. They are very easy to remove. Remove the washers.

Take the bushing off the control arm. You will have to press the rubber bushing off. I did it with my fingers and found it wasn’t that hard.





Here is a pic of the other bushing completely removed.



Clean the arm around the shifter arm with the solvent, rag and the 100 grit sand paper. The bushing should slip on. Put the bushing on with the larger part towards the arm (this is so the c-clip will be easier to install). And slip the cable on to the bushing.

The hardest part of this whole install is trying to get enough force to put the c-clips on. I did it by hand but it did a number on my thumbs and took me a good 5-10min for the both of them.

Locate the direction of the hole in the shifter arm in which the cotter pins will go through. For the vertical bushing you can put the cotter pin from the top so it has no chance of dropping out.



Make sure you double check your work (particularly that the c-clips are all the way on).

Now put the lug nuts back on the wheel with the 21mm socket/ratchet and alloy lug key. You should try to put the lug nuts on like a star so that the wheel is strait while the car is in the air. Whenever you torque something with more than 3 bolts you should always torque one bolt then the one across from it to insure that what you are torque-ing down is flush with the surface it’s getting torque-d to.

With both the front and rear wheels lugs decently tight; lower the car to the ground.

With the car on the ground grab your torque wrench with the 21mm socket and set it to either of the settings below. I set my torque wrench to 76 ft-lbf because it was one of the measurements on it. All the below torque figures are the same torque however.

Wheel nut torque
N-m (kgf-m, ft-lbf)
103 (10.5, 76)

Torque the wheels using the star pattern to insure the wheel is flush and strait. The alloy wheel lock should also be torque-d. You might want to double check the torque after.

Note: If you don’t torque the wheel nuts you run the risks of over tightening them (stripping the lug nuts) or under tightening them (wheel falls off while driving).

Note: Unless you have an expensive pneumatic gun that has torque settings (acts as a torque wrench), you should never use a pneumatic gun to tighten the lug nuts. They might strip.

Go for a drive.

So the combination of both of the solid shifter bushings makes quite a bit of difference. It feels more accurate, precise and slightly stiff with some of play eliminated. These don’t cure worn or bad syncros. However you can really feel it go into gear especially the straight cut reverse. After driving for an hour I got used to the difference so it kind wore off a little, but I know for a fact that it still feels better.

If you have any questions, concerns, or something to add. Feel free!

Update: After driving the car for a week, the cable bushings appear to be bedding in. Shifter has good precise action between the gates and it's taking less effort to move between gears. Dog leg 3-2 feels better. Still feels a little stiff in the lateral direction but not much, control is still very good.


Last edited by Exage; 03-04-2014 at 11:04 PM. Reason: Addition
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post #2 of 20 Old 03-15-2015, 12:26 PM
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I just did this install today. One of my OE bushings was seized on the stud and was a PITA to remove. Eventually, with the help of some penetrating oil and a small vise grip, I was able to get some movement out of it and remove it. I had to go in over the engine to get enough swing. Other than that, things went well.

2004 Corolla CE Manual
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post #3 of 20 Old 03-15-2015, 01:21 PM
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This DIY is not for your regular 2003-2008 Corolla with 1ZZ-FE engine.... Like on mine, it's all done in the engine compartment, up behind tranny on top.
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post #4 of 20 Old 03-15-2015, 01:57 PM
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That's where I started, but wasn't able to get any leverage to get the seized one off, so I switched to underneath the car.

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post #5 of 20 Old 01-21-2016, 06:52 PM
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We just did the shifter bushings on a 2003 matrix with the CRW spherical shift bushing kit. These are waaaayyyy better than the worn out stock or brass, aluminun, solid shifter bushings!
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post #6 of 20 Old 02-18-2017, 07:24 PM
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I found an easier method to completing this swap. Seat the bushing onto the shifter cable and use needle nose pliers to seat the c clip. Saved my thumbs. So far, it's a welcome upgrade from the sloppiness of the rubber bushing. Didn't need to reuse the stock washers either. Took me around 2 hours. Got flustered with the dang c clip.
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post #7 of 20 Old 02-22-2017, 08:20 PM
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Exage, did you notice any binding in the shifter cable mod? I noticed this morning that the shifter was really tight. Maybe it's because it was cold? Around 40 degrees. I haven't done the shifter base bushings yet. Feels like it's starting to break in though. 3rd gear feels like it's stuck going into the gate.
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post #8 of 20 Old 02-22-2017, 08:42 PM
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I upgraded to Speed Source brass shifter cable bushings and braided steel clutch line many years ago.

http://speed-source.net/?wpsc-produc...ifter-bushings


Quote:
Originally Posted by 75aces View Post
Exage, did you notice any binding in the shifter cable mod? I noticed this morning that the shifter was really tight. Maybe it's because it was cold? Around 40 degrees. I haven't done the shifter base bushings yet. Feels like it's starting to break in though. 3rd gear feels like it's stuck going into the gate.

Back out the rubber boot on front shifter cable end near transmission. Clean and sand off the rust from cable end rod. Apply much penetrating oil while working the cable, then add grease under boot. Zip-tie it back on to prevent water ingestion and corrosion.... Remove your selecting bellcrank assembly as well to clean out the rust and pack it up with grease. It's on top of your tranny, held down by two bolts.

Keep an eye on that square black 'Control Shift Lever Bush' when you remove selecting bellcrank assy from tranny... Apply grease to it to make it stick in place upon reinstallation.

You can secure the selecting bellcrank support in a vise, or use Vise-Grip or an adjustable wrench to hold it while you loosen nut to open it up.


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post #9 of 20 Old 02-22-2017, 10:36 PM
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Thanks invader. To do the SS braided clutch line, does that require to bleed the slave cylinder?
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post #10 of 20 Old 02-23-2017, 08:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 75aces View Post
Thanks invader. To do the SS braided clutch line, does that require to bleed the slave cylinder?
Yes, I did somehow... I like it a lot. It's very sturdy, and it seems to work, especially with my slightly stronger than stock Korean Seco clutch. The clutch is a beauty too, especially for the price. The larger clutch disc springs are also perfect for the extra torque I'm relaying through it. Great upgrade over stock Aisin unit.

The new ones are of a cool design, with 6 clutch disc springs instead of four, still with the same excellent diaphragm spring curling type pressure plate:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/FX-HEAVY-DUT...0AAOSwtJZXWfJh

http://www.secoautomotive.com/eng/pr...utch-cover.php
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post #11 of 20 Old 02-25-2017, 09:57 AM
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Thanks for the info invader. What kind of lube should I be using on the shifter cable boot? What about the penetrating oil for the ends of the shifter cables? Any chance of damaging the cables if left as is?
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 75aces View Post
Thanks for the info invader. What kind of lube should I be using on the shifter cable boot? What about the penetrating oil for the ends of the shifter cables? Any chance of damaging the cables if left as is?
Shifter cable end is under the said boot... With the cable ends pulled up, you can start by working in some WD-40 to penetrate in the cables. After cleaning it off, I like half filling the boot with ATF, as grease only gets sticky over time. You do however want to use grease in your selecting bellcrank assembly.
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post #13 of 20 Old 02-25-2017, 08:09 PM
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Here's something I noticed recently. If I shift fast, the shifter will enter 3rd gear pretty well. However, if I do it slowly, then it gets stuck for less than half a second and then engage.
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post #14 of 20 Old 06-06-2017, 01:48 PM
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Update : got around to installing the speed source shifter base aluminum bushings. Initially, there was no change. Feels easier to shift into 3 but do notice it becomes notchy at times. Much better feel over the rubber stock bushings. Do you know if there is a bushing at the top of the cage?
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post #15 of 20 Old 06-06-2017, 03:59 PM
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Which cage are you referring to?
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