Highlander 2018 Oil Filter Housing (Aluminium) - Toyota Nation Forum : Toyota Car and Truck Forums
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post #1 of 56 Old 03-07-2019, 01:34 PM Thread Starter
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Highlander 2018 Oil Filter Housing (Aluminium)

Wondering if anyone here has replace their Plastic Oil Filter Housing with an Aluminium one....For my 2018 Hghlander LE the Original Housing part # is 15620-36020 and I'm trying to figure out if the 15620-31060 Oil Filter Cap Assembly would be a good fit.

Thanks
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post #2 of 56 Old 03-07-2019, 02:53 PM
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It should be a good fit.

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post #3 of 56 Old 03-07-2019, 07:02 PM
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I know those of us that DIY immediately say, "great, Toyota made another part cheaper." The same idea has been discussed with other Toyota models. The consensus is don't do it! Toyota switched to plastic for a reason - evidently they've had trouble with the metal canisters.

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post #4 of 56 Old 03-07-2019, 09:11 PM
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Wait what? I haven’t changed the oil in my lander yet(still on Toyota care). The filter housing is plastic? Like the thing that holds the cartridge filter that my 3.5L Camry has that is metal? Seriously?


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post #5 of 56 Old 03-07-2019, 10:58 PM
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Evidently Toyota had trouble with the cost of the aluminum housings

Consensus is for braindead fools that can't think independently
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post #6 of 56 Old 03-08-2019, 12:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by toto View Post
I know those of us that DIY immediately say, "great, Toyota made another part cheaper." The same idea has been discussed with other Toyota models. The consensus is don't do it! Toyota switched to plastic for a reason - evidently they've had trouble with the metal canisters.
Morons overtightening damaging the threads on the mount as well as the housing.
It's not "plastic"... it is a glass-filled composite.
It's a lot more pleasant to remove from a hot engine.
If some idiot overtightens it, the housing is toast, not your filter mount.

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post #7 of 56 Old 03-08-2019, 12:51 AM
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The oil filter module made by MANN+HUMMEL has a plastic cap that is removed to replace the cartridge.
https://www.mann-hummel.com/en/areas...al-management/

MANN+HUMMEL also makes the cartridge filters which are sold under the following brands they now own: Mann-Filter, Wix Filters, Filtron, Purolator.

Mahle also makes oil filtration systems with a plastic filter housing:
http://www.us.mahle.com/en/products-...ules/index.jsp

I am not sure which auto manufacturer uses what oil filtration manufacturer, but I have seen the plastic oil filter caps on BMW, Audi, VW, Genesis and other brands. MANN+HUMMEL and Mahle oil filtration systems are also used in commercial vehicles.

Toyota may make their own oil filtration systems, given the number of vehicles they produce each year, but not sure.
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post #8 of 56 Old 03-08-2019, 06:22 AM
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And when the threads on the housing fail, you'll be treated to a similar fate that the rubber lines of the engine oil cooler gave the 2GR-FE owners a few years back - an oil leak that toasts your engine! That's a well conceived solution to the over tightening problem.....

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post #9 of 56 Old 03-08-2019, 09:21 AM
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And this is just another reason why I change my own oil.


Wife's car has well over 200k miles and I've done dozens of oil changes. Same filter and housing as my 14 highlander....never had an issue...and I won't. I don't rush through an oil change....even when it's -10.
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post #10 of 56 Old 03-08-2019, 10:46 AM
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Right,
Another good reason to not go to the dealer and have the kids study and practice their new job on your car....
Which might take an hour or more, and you will have mistakes like oil overfills, or this issue, among other things like scratches or what have you.
Oil change after the first 1 or 2 can take me about 25min.
It costs me about $30 for Mobile 1 full synthetic with OEM filter.
I have the Fumoto valve and have not changed a gasket in years.

I encourage those that have a little common sense, and have the physical ability, with the convenience of buying the products in a bit bulk so you have it on hand when needed...To do your own oil change.
The satisfaction of doing it right, and the time savings alone will be worth it.

Is there a torque spec on the aluminum canister?
I dont use it. I wouldn't mind using it.
So far I use a bit of common sense, feel that it is tight enough, and not stupid tight.
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Last edited by Phil Indeblanc; 03-08-2019 at 10:52 AM.
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post #11 of 56 Old 03-08-2019, 04:57 PM
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The housing uses a barrel seal O-ring design, not a face seal. If the seal is in contact with the housing and mount, it will seal unless it or a sealing surface is damaged.
I took scuba lighting battery canisters with this type of seal down to 130ft... 72psi... and they were secured with nothing more than McMaster spring clamps like you might see on a small equipment flight case.
The same design has been taken to 450ft (<200psi) and is completely reliable.


Some people have complained about their filters leaking.
If it is leaking, the o-ring was improperly installed, it was damaged during installation, or the housing or mount have a damaged sealing surface.


The torque spec IIRC is 18 ft/lbs, but it does not require any more torque than is needed to prevent the housing from vibrating loose between oil changes. The spring clip on the side of the mount helps to prevent that.
Personally, I run it down until it gets to the mount, then just enough to move the "fins" past the spring clip. No more is needed.
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post #12 of 56 Old 03-13-2019, 10:05 AM
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I bought one and had dealer swap it out first oil change on my '17 Taco.

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post #13 of 56 Old 04-16-2019, 09:25 PM
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Paper-Thin Aluminum Housing Threads Damaged Filter Housing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fibber2 View Post
And when the threads on the housing fail, you'll be treated to a similar fate that the rubber lines of the engine oil cooler gave the 2GR-FE owners a few years back - an oil leak that toasts your engine! That's a well conceived solution to the over tightening problem.....
I've been changing oil since I was 16 years old, starting with my Karmann Ghia VW. Never in my lifetime (now 70) have I ever had any problems changing oil in an engine, until now. It has 4,960 miles on it, and I wanted to change the oil at 5,000, even though they say you can go up to 10,000 before first change. I changed my oil (Mobil 1 synthetic) every 5,000 miles in my 2000 Dodge Dakota HO V8, and now it has over 500,000 miles on the engine, and still running well.

Before we got the vehicle I bought all the oil changing tools to remove the filter housing, etc. Got under the vehicle this evening and started by using that spigot to drain the filter housing, which did not work very well at all. It would have been easier to just remove the housing and dump the oil in the tub.

I could not believe how much torque it took to unscrew the plastic housing from the block. I did not use a torque wrench to remove the housing, but it took about 3-6 turns (estimate) before I could turn it off with my hand instead of the wrench. Got it off, took the old filter out, put the new one in and proceeded to reinstall the filter housing. I started to screw it in by hand, and after got it going a thread or two, I started to use the special wrench adapter to tighten it up all the way. After about three or four turns, it started to get hard to turn, even with the wrench, and I started to hear something like 'sand' grinding in the threads.

I removed the filter housing to look at the threads to see what might be causing the abrasive noise. What I found was aluminum fragments embedded in the plastic housing threads, and it had trashed the first three or four layers of threads. I then got farther under the car to take a look at the aluminum internal threads in the block only to find that there were paper-thin leading edge threads that had galled up into the plastic and trashed the plastic housing. Where the leading edge first threads used to be until the thickness of the threads were such that they did not flake off, there was the left over rough surface where those leading edge paper-thin threads used to be.

Needless to say, I did not have another plastic housing in hand, and without a lift there was no way I could get under the vehicle to dress up the internal threads to a condition they should have been machined in the first place. So, tomorrow morning I will have to get the vehicle towed to the dealer for repair.

I disconnected the negative battery lead so the vehicle cannot be started, since there is no oil filter housing installed at this time. The only way I can think this is going to have to be repaired is to have the first and second threads removed by a small hand grinder to get up to some thick threads as the starting threads for the housing.

Maybe this plastic oil housing is not so much a bad design as it is the result of bad manufacturing machining. At this time I would prefer the old style filters that you just screwed on with a large rubber gasket at the top where it met the block.

If we ever let a thread job like that leave our machine shop, we'd have been out of business years ago.

Over the years, all the engineering jobs I ever had, from production engineer at GE Aircraft Engine Group, and co-op trained engineer at Caterpillar in Aurora, IL, prior to that, and all the maintenance I have had to do on my trucks and autos, and engine room machinery on board ship during Nam, I say that design engineers should not be allowed to design one part for a product until they have had hours of time doing maintenance on said products. Mandating such just might make it easier to do maintenance on machines, or I should say, even possible.
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post #14 of 56 Old 04-16-2019, 09:45 PM
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I could not believe how much torque it took to unscrew the plastic housing from the block. I did not use a torque wrench to remove the housing, but it took about 3-6 turns (estimate) before I could turn it off with my hand instead of the wrench. Got it off, took the old filter out, put the new one in and proceeded to reinstall the filter housing. I started to screw it in by hand, and after got it going a thread or two, I started to use the special wrench adapter to tighten it up all the way. After about three or four turns, it started to get hard to turn, even with the wrench, and I started to hear something like 'sand' grinding in the threads.


Witness to that. I had to take cheat pipe to OEM housing removal tool to loosen it. I replaced "glass filled with resin" ones with aluminum right away. On both my Highlander and NX200. Thing is, I work professionally with plastics. I rather use metal housing. Let me add something here. Glass filled with resin (enforced with fiberglass weave or fibers) is still plastic. They all fall into same category of compounds.

Ad hoc. 3/8 square hole in the bottom of housing is not for housing removal. It is oil drain. Buy removal tool, every parts store has it.
Torque is very simple. Aluminum twists in only so far. It simply stops at some point. Never had leak at that hand torque. Easy to remove.



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post #15 of 56 Old 04-16-2019, 10:26 PM
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Paper-Thin Aluminum Housing Threads Damaged Filter Housing

Thanks for your reply ukrkoz.

I have the OEM tool to engage the large "nut" at the bottom of the removal tool. I did not use a 3/8" drive to remove the filter. I purchased all the correct tools for the oil changes prior to even getting delivery of the vehicle.

Since I will get it towed tomorrow to the dealer, I went back out and took some pictures of the internal block housing threads. From those pictures I can see that whoever cut those threads during manufacturing used a dull cutting tool, not enough coolant, and/or also wrong feed and speed to cut those aluminum threads. I took a paper towel and used it around the threads to check the smoothness. When I enlarge the photos you can see where ALL the threads from beginning to end, have very rough surfaces.

So. Realizing what I have machined into my new engine block is something that has trashed the vehicle. There is no way they can re-chase the threads without removing the engine and putting it back on a horizontal mill. Forever more a plastic housing will gall up, and it will only become harder to get the housing on and off over time. At this time I cannot think of a good fix for this problem, and it all comes from someone not paying attention to the finish on the threads he/she was cutting into the block. Quality control has failed in the Indiana plant, as far as I'm concerned. Never saw this type of a problem with all the prior (7) Toyotas we had that were made IN JAPAN.

Right now, I'm of the mindset that there is no way I am going to have ANYONE suggest that they replace the engine with a new one that does not have this defect. That is a sure way to only sign up for many more problems in the future, where any mechanic will not be able to make it like new, not even 5,000 miles. Just makes me totally disgusted. Anymore it is nearly impossible to get a good product made that doesn't have some "junk" contained in it. Makes me wish I had not given my 2000 Dakota to my brother. I liked that exterior design best.

Take a look at the pictures I've attached. If you had the originals, it is very easy to see the finish on the threads when zoomed in using Photoshop. It is hard to find good qualified, experienced machinists anymore in the U.S. My brother's old shop, in Cincinnati, used to make (and he still does) PROHOLD Workholding fixtures for the big three and many other metal manufacturing entities. I know what a bad machined surface looks like.
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