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    1. · Registered
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      1,343 Posts
      00 Camry i4.

      Would I have to lift the car up on all 4 tires to get to it?

      Would this tool do? http://www.harborfreight.com/14-in-38-in-drive-long-reach-dual-flex-head-ratchet-67994.html

      I already have a O2 sensor socket.

      Thanks!
      At a minimum you'll need to raise the front wheels, with a jack and stands, or ramps.

      With modern quality ratchets, breaker bars are obsolete. The square drive will fail on both before the mechanism in the ratchet breaks.

      I prefer either of these two for high torque applications. The extendable ratchet is nice if there's no room to hold the head of the ratchet, but the flex head is handy when you don't have a straight shot at the fastener.

      http://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-drive-professional-flex-head-long-handle-ratchet-62332.html

      http://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-drive-extendable-ratchet-62311.html

      If it's been a long time since it's been removed, snip the wires and use a regular deep (preferably impact) socket. Use your 02 sensor socket when you install the new one.
       
    1. · Registered
      96 camry 2.2
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      483 Posts
      I just did another timing belt/water pump job last week. I have found that using a long handle ratchet makes it much easier to turn to set or check timing. Since you are using less force, you are much less likely to over shoot when it gives. Throw in a couple of long extensions and it becomes much more comfortable and easier to keep an eye both marks.

      I like this one: http://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-drive-extendable-ratchet-62311.html
       
    1. · Registered
      96 camry 2.2
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      483 Posts
      I put a new timing belt on a 96 camry 4 cylinder just two days ago and that part of the work took less than two hours. With three camrys I've done this a few times and this was only the timing belt because the cheap old one stretched after 11 months. A first timer doing all the seals and water pump should take around five hours I'd guess.

      A basic metric socket set with a 6 inch extension to loosen the power steering belt and a 14mm wrench for the motor mount are needed along with a jack stand. A 1/4 toque wrench (harbor freight will work) for the water pump if you're doing it. Borrow a harmonic balance puller from an auto parts place before you start and grab two m6 60mm long bolts and four 1/4 washer (standard is cheaper than metric with two for each bolt) Use the m6 bolts in the harmonic balancer puller if it's needed and then use them to hold the harmonic balancer still while you torque it down.

      My tool to hold the harmonic balancer is just a piece of 1/4 x 1 inch steel flat bar cut into two pieces (one 22" and one 6") with three 1/4 holes drilled into it. A 1/4 bolt and nut for a hinge and the other two for the m6 bolts to hold the harmonic balancer. An impact gun or the starter bump method will remove the bolt easily. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt...l-Flat-Bar-with-1-4-in-Thick-801857/204225720

      To turn the crank for timing I use a 19mm socket with two extensions on a 1/2 extendable ratchet. This allows me to stand and see the timing mark on the harmonic balancer and turn it with ease. https://www.harborfreight.com/12-in-drive-extendable-ratchet-62311.html
       

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    1. · イリジウム
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      15,408 Posts
      I use Harbor Freight's Taiwan-made torque wrenches $9.99 each when on sale. I had a warranty claim (lifetime btw) for a bad ratchet head and had problems with a China-made replacement. Took it back and the next batch were made in Taiwan. Problem solved.

      These HFT ones work fine for me. Some complained about the clicks are muted (or become just a light bump) at lower torques. If you can deal with that you shouldn't have problems. Just be careful with values below 20% of the max for any torque wrench. For example, on a 3/8"-drive 80 lb/ft one, be careful with torque settings below 16 lb/ft, even if there are markings down to 5 or 10 lb/ft, depending on the batch of wrenches.

      For wheel lugs, you really do need a 1/2"-drive, sockets and extension(s). You'll find them at Harbor Freight. 3/8"-drives will twist and not give you the proper torque, even if the max rating is 80 lb/ft.

      For spark plugs, if you torque to 13 lb/ft for example, use a 1/4"-drive INCH-pound one, and torque to 13 * 12 = 156 Inch-pounds, instead of using a 3/8" torque wrench, because of the 20% rule above.

      If you want better torque wrenches, some members like Tekton. Do note that some of these only torque in the right-hand direction, whereas the HFT ones these days measure torque in both directions.

      On Tekton website and on Amazon:

      Tekton offers $5 off on their website until 10/22, and 10% reward for use next purchase.

      Also check out Lexivon ones on Amazon, 8-10% off coupon right now. I haven't used these, but these carry calibration certs and are made in Taiwan:

      Harbor Freight also has an Icon line of torque wrenches. Look real nice, but IMO they're overpriced.

      Also a fave of mine, the extendable ratchet. I didn't like their combo 1/4-3/8 one that you flip over. But Amazon has individual ones of various no-name brands:

      Compare tool brands on Amazon as well.
       
    1. · イリジウム
      Joined
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      15,408 Posts
      A breaker bar from the top side or an extendable ratchet may help provide better torque on the fill plug. The standard ~7" ratchet sometimes doesn't cut it especially if the plug's been on there for a while. And don't go overboard tightening these. And make sure the socket is fully seated to prevent rounding the plug out.

       
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