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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
UPDATE - I see now there is a splined (toothed?) ring at the end of the CV joint that the wheel speed sensor uses for input. So there would be no need for a magnet in/on the bearing itself (at least for this vehicle). Thanks for your responses.

Unfortunately, I misdiagnosed the noise coming from the left front as the bearing. After replacement the noise is still there. It's a 'shhhh - shhhh - shhhh' associated with wheel speed. Not metallic sounding and not a backing plate against a rotor. Brake use does not change the sound. Brakes are in very good condition. Prime suspect at this point is the tire itself - perhaps an internal, not visible issue. Will be rotating that tire to see if it changes.

ORIGINAL POST: Purchased two of these from Amazon, where a couple other buyers said they work with ABS. However, there's no detail in the description whether they do. Timken's own application site is indicating they're not compatible - see photo. A small screwdriver and even a paper clip shows no magnetism on either side of the bearings. The bearings are stamped Koyo Japan. Anyone have experience with these? I have everything pulled apart and am ready to take the spindles in to have the old bearing pressed out and new ones pressed in.

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An abs hub will usually incorporate the speed sensor ring. I I've never heard of a bearing being magnetized, it would create un-necessary wear and load on the bearing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
An abs hub will usually incorporate the speed sensor ring. I I've never heard of a bearing being magnetized, it would create un-necessary wear and load on the bearing.
Thanks. Keeping my fingers crossed. Will be putting everything back together tomorrow.
 

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Some newer Hondas went over to having ABS reluctors in the bearing rubber seal. Usually one side has metal seal to differentiate. Most European cars use this style forever. AFAIK, yours should still have the reluctor ring on the outer CV joint. Therefore the catalog is correct that it's a non-abs bearing, because it doesn't have reluctors in a rubber seal.

Is yours Koyo or Toyo? I'm seeing more aftermarket bearings from Timken but usually they have either NSK or Koyo in there, both of which are OEM. You can also find NSK on rockauto. With OEM both seals should still be metal, not sure if that's changed. Some cheap aftermarket use rubber seals on both sides.

I'd consider changing out the wheel studs while at it, about $2 a piece.

And use the rockauto 5% off code if you buy from there, scroll to the newest post:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Some newer Hondas went over to having ABS reluctors in the bearing rubber seal. Usually one side has metal seal to differentiate. Most European cars use this style forever. AFAIK, yours should still have the reluctor ring on the outer CV joint. Therefore the catalog is correct that it's a non-abs bearing, because it doesn't have reluctors in a rubber seal.

Is yours Koyo or Toyo? I'm seeing more aftermarket bearings from Timken but usually they have either NSK or Koyo in there, both of which are OEM. You can also find NSK on rockauto. With OEM both seals should still be metal, not sure if that's changed. Some cheap aftermarket use rubber seals on both sides.

I'd consider changing out the wheel studs while at it, about $2 a piece.

And use the rockauto 5% off code if you buy from there, scroll to the newest post:
The bearing is branded Koyo. I initially reported Toyo by mistake. See my update to original post. Thanks.
 

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Did you figure out your noise issue? First off, Koyo is a good brand wheel bearing, ive had great luck with them in the past.

As for your noise...if it’s not the bearing or the brakes, yeah tires would be the most likely thing. A worn tire can mimic a bad wheel bearing, but it tends to change in tone and pitch, related to vehicle speed. Something as simple as a little cupping will certainly cause noise. Other than that? I suppose a bearing in the transfer case could cause the noise...unlikely, but it could. And before you think the brakes are good, and I’m sure they are, it wouldn’t hurt to take them apart, re-grease, clean, adjust as necessary. Sometimes brake dust or hardware will make all sorts of different noises. Whether it changes while you’re stepping on the brake or not.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the follow-up Mthurl. I did add an update to the original post. Anyway, after replacing the bearings on both sides (thinking if the one failed, the other might not be far behind), the noise was still there. Turns out it was the tire. I really should have rotated the tires during my initial investigation. Would have saved myself a lot of work. Live and learn, as they say. I didn't suspect the tire as they're Pirelli P7's in good condition with very even wear and no cupping (I rotate every 5 - 6k).
 

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Thanks for the update.

I mostly run Michelins from Costco. With up to $150 off specials they often run, Michelins are very price competitive.
 
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