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2014 Corolla
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How to replace a PCV valve. In order to access the PCV valve, you have to remove the intake manifold. Yes, you read that right. Toyota (via AllData DIY) wants you to take the manifold and throttle body completely off. That's completely unnecessary. The job is not as complex as it seems.

This is a reference video on what the job entails and reinforces my prior two sentences:

Tools needed:
Torque wrench
Socket wrench extensions
10mm socket
12mm socket (both shallow and deep)
Telescoping magnet or equivalent
22mm deep socket
Panel puller or equivalent
Hose clamp piers or regular pliers
Red Loctite or equivalent
PCV valve - Toyota Part Number 12204-37010

Remove the cover.



The image above is a reference of everything that needs to be removed.

Start by disconnecting all of the hoses as indicated. All except one hose you can remove by hand. Use the hose clamp pliers or equivalent to remove that one hose. You may have to work the hoses out if they never been removed.
Remove the hose from the top of the engine, throttle body (10mm socket) and air box (10mm socket)
Pull the hose out of the car and set aside.

Disconnect the wire harness clamps where indicated. I used a panel puller for one and the other was easy to remove without tools by moving the loosening where it locks. You can try to remove the ones from the bottom of the intake manifold. I found it easier to remove them once the manifold bolts/nuts were off. I disconnected the harness clamp from the front alternator. It made it easier to access the other harness clamps which I removed from the rear as it was easier to squeeze one side out at a time and push out.



Begin removing the bolts and nuts attached to the intake manifold. See the the next several images for exact locations.
Use your magnet when removing the nuts from the intake manifold, that way it won't drop as soon as you remove your socket.













Once the bolts are removed, pull the intake manifold stay out and set it aside. You can now move the manifold off the engine.
If you haven't already, disconnect the remaining harness clamps attached (2) to the intake manifold.
Carefully move it aside without banging the throttle body too much and you'll see where the PCV valve is located.



Remove the hose connected to the PCV valve.
Use your 22mm socket to remove the PCV valve. Warning, it's on tight.
Once you have the PCV valve out, compare the old to the new one.
It should look like the next picture



Once you've confirmed the part is correct, add Red Loctite or equivalent and thread the PVC valve by hand.
** If you used Red Loctite, it's advised to let it cure for an hour before you begin driving the car.
Use socket to tighten the PCV valve the rest of the way. Torque spec is 20 Nm or 15 ft-lb
The next picture shows the PCV valve installed and the hose attached.



Reassembly (no pictures).

You can replace the intake manifold gasket if you choose to do so. I made the choice not to with no ill effects.
Reconnect the two harness clamps to the bottom of the manifold.
Place the intake manifold back in its normal position.
Replace the intake manifold stay in its proper place.
Reattach the bolts/nuts to the intake manifold. Torque spec is 28 Nm or 21 ft-lb.
Reattach the hose to the the air box, throttle body, and the top of the engine.
Reconnect all of the hoses that you haven't already attached.
Reattach any harness clamps that you detached.
Replace the engine cover.

Congratulations, you just changed the PCV valve!
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
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23,325 Posts
How to replace a PCV valve. In order to access the PCV valve, you have to remove the intake manifold. Yes, you read that right. Toyota (via AllData DIY) wants you to take the manifold and throttle body completely off. That's completely unnecessary. The job is not as complex as it seems.

This is a reference video on what the job entails and reinforces my prior two sentences:

Tools needed:
Torque wrench
Socket wrench extensions
10mm socket
12mm socket (both shallow and deep)
Telescoping magnet or equivalent
22mm deep socket
Panel puller or equivalent
Hose clamp piers or regular pliers
Red Loctite or equivalent
PCV valve - Toyota Part Number 12204-37010

Remove the cover.



The image above is a reference of everything that needs to be removed.

Start by disconnecting all of the hoses as indicated. All except one hose you can remove by hand. Use the hose clamp pliers or equivalent to remove that one hose. You may have to work the hoses out if they never been removed.
Remove the hose from the top of the engine, throttle body (10mm socket) and air box (10mm socket)
Pull the hose out of the car and set aside.

Disconnect the wire harness clamps where indicated. I used a panel puller for one and the other was easy to remove without tools by moving the loosening where it locks. You can try to remove the ones from the bottom of the intake manifold. I found it easier to remove them once the manifold bolts/nuts were off. I disconnected the harness clamp from the front alternator. It made it easier to access the other harness clamps which I removed from the rear as it was easier to squeeze one side out at a time and push out.



Begin removing the bolts and nuts attached to the intake manifold. See the the next several images for exact locations.
Use your magnet when removing the nuts from the intake manifold, that way it won't drop as soon as you remove your socket.













Once the bolts are removed, pull the intake manifold stay out and set it aside. You can now move the manifold off the engine.
If you haven't already, disconnect the remaining harness clamps attached (2) to the intake manifold.
Carefully move it aside without banging the throttle body too much and you'll see where the PCV valve is located.



Remove the hose connected to the PCV valve.
Use your 22mm socket to remove the PCV valve. Warning, it's on tight.
Once you have the PCV valve out, compare the old to the new one.
It should look like the next picture



Once you've confirmed the part is correct, add Red Loctite or equivalent and thread the PVC valve by hand.
** If you used Red Loctite, it's advised to let it cure for an hour before you begin driving the car.
Use socket to tighten the PCV valve the rest of the way. Torque spec is 20 Nm or 15 ft-lb
The next picture shows the PCV valve installed and the hose attached.



Reassembly (no pictures).

You can replace the intake manifold gasket if you choose to do so. I made the choice not to with no ill effects.
Reconnect the two harness clamps to the bottom of the manifold.
Place the intake manifold back in its normal position.
Replace the intake manifold stay in its proper place.
Reattach the bolts/nuts to the intake manifold. Torque spec is 28 Nm or 21 ft-lb.
Reattach the hose to the the air box, throttle body, and the top of the engine.
Reconnect all of the hoses that you haven't already attached.
Reattach any harness clamps that you detached.
Replace the engine cover.

Congratulations, you just changed the PCV valve!
Yep, it's a lot easier than people think it is. I just installed an OCC last year on my 2017 Corolla iM. I didn't change the PCV valve because it only had 13k miles on the car but this gave me enough room to change it on my 2009 Corolla S when I did that a couple of years ago. Even taking out the intake manifold isn't very hard. I had to remove it on my wife's 2010 Prius which is the same design because the intake was very nasty with 110k miles on it and it took me a lot of time to clean the intake runners from the oil film and sludge that lined the intake runners. I hope that this video can also help some people too.

 

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Registered
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315 Posts
Hopefully this video answers a few basic questions about battery and charging system health that can be accomplished with just a voltmeter.
There is text under the video if you want a bit more detail.
 

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Registered
2016 Toyota Corolla LE & 2006 Toyota Camry
Joined
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158 Posts
Anyone make a video on installing Injen X-Pedal Pro Throttle Controller? Just want to see how the controller’s wire is ran into the dash and out. Trying to avoid taking apart my dashboard.
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
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23,325 Posts
Anyone make a video on installing Injen X-Pedal Pro Throttle Controller? Just want to see how the controller’s wire is ran into the dash and out. Trying to avoid taking apart my dashboard.
The throttle controllers all install the same basic way. You disconnect the connection at the gas pedal. Connect the wire into the gas pedal from the throttle controller. The other connector from the throttle controller goes to the the that was connected to the gas pedal. Then just locate the controller where you want it on the dash and connect into the OBD2 port. It's really very straight forward.

Here is the thread I posted when I installed one on my 2009 Corolla many years ago.
 
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Posts #9 & #20 show 2 ways to change the CVT fluid.
I was curious about how much new fluid is retained when doing 3 drain and fills (post#9), so I set up an excel file that calculates the amount of new vs old fluid if you do multiple 2 quart oil changes on an 8 quart total fill. (numbers rounded)

I though it would reach some kind of equilibrium at some point, but it doesn't seem to do that. There are diminishing returns and given how expensive a 4 quart can of Toyota CVT FE fluid is, well, I thought this might help.
2 qts changed in 8 qt system.
Font Pattern Parallel Number Screenshot
 

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Diehard Rams Fan
Joined
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23,325 Posts
Posts #9 & #20 show 2 ways to change the CVT fluid.
I was curious about how much new fluid is retained when doing 3 drain and fills (post#9), so I set up an excel file that calculates the amount of new vs old fluid if you do multiple 2 quart oil changes on an 8 quart total fill. (numbers rounded)

I though it would reach some kind of equilibrium at some point, but it doesn't seem to do that. There are diminishing returns and given how expensive a 4 quart can of Toyota CVT FE fluid is, well, I thought this might help.
2 qts changed in 8 qt system.
View attachment 381124
Great information to see how it slowly changes the % of new to old fluid.
 

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Premium Member
2021 Avalon XSE Hybrid
Joined
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6,936 Posts
Posts #9 & #20 show 2 ways to change the CVT fluid.
I was curious about how much new fluid is retained when doing 3 drain and fills (post#9), so I set up an excel file that calculates the amount of new vs old fluid if you do multiple 2 quart oil changes on an 8 quart total fill. (numbers rounded)

I though it would reach some kind of equilibrium at some point, but it doesn't seem to do that. There are diminishing returns and given how expensive a 4 quart can of Toyota CVT FE fluid is, well, I thought this might help.
2 qts changed in 8 qt system.
View attachment 381124
That's a good chart.

It's almost exactly the same thing inflating tires with nitrogen.
Freshly mounted on the wheel, the tire is inflated to 1 ATA, 14.7psi.
The target is just a little over 3 ATA (49.7psi minus 14.7 psi)
So if the tire installer just adds 35psiof nitrogen on top of the existing ~15psi of air, he's only displacing ~7.3psi of oxygen, and still has 3psi of oxygen in there.
 

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Token Aussie
1998 AE102 sedan, 2006 ZZE122 wagon, 2018 ZRE182 hatch
Joined
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2,630 Posts
Posts #9 & #20 show 2 ways to change the CVT fluid.
I was curious about how much new fluid is retained when doing 3 drain and fills (post#9), so I set up an excel file that calculates the amount of new vs old fluid if you do multiple 2 quart oil changes on an 8 quart total fill. (numbers rounded)

I though it would reach some kind of equilibrium at some point, but it doesn't seem to do that. There are diminishing returns and given how expensive a 4 quart can of Toyota CVT FE fluid is, well, I thought this might help.
2 qts changed in 8 qt system.
View attachment 381124
Any teenager who has tried to surreptitiously skim from their parent's vodka bottle and top up with water knows the diminishing returns equation...

Also anyone who enjoys sherry (the solera system uses the same fractional blending equations)
 

·
Token Aussie
1998 AE102 sedan, 2006 ZZE122 wagon, 2018 ZRE182 hatch
Joined
·
2,630 Posts
That's a good chart.

It's almost exactly the same thing inflating tires with nitrogen.
Freshly mounted on the wheel, the tire is inflated to 1 ATA, 14.7psi.
The target is just a little over 3 ATA (49.7psi minus 14.7 psi)
So if the tire installer just adds 35psiof nitrogen on top of the existing ~15psi of air, he's only displacing ~7.3psi of oxygen, and still has 3psi of oxygen in there.
Proper nitrogen filling processes purge the air inside the tyre - obviously there will still be a tiny amount left but will be a lot less than if it was just a straight nitrogen fill on top of the existing atmospheric-pressure air fill.

Also, using partial-pressures instead of volumes can get quite confusing
 
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