Toyota Nation Forum banner

1986 22r SR5 running rough, won't start when warm. Advice?

861 Views 31 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  MikeHVA
I'm looking at purchasing an '86 Hilux SR5 with 22r, 5-speed manual, IFS, dual transfer cases, and about 220k miles. It's in the Pacific Northwest area. The owner says it's been sitting a while and runs rough, and after it's warmed up it has problems starting again until it's cooled off. Apparently the warm starting issue is a somewhat common problem with these that is sometimes a PITA to solve, but usually nothing major....but I'm a little more concerned about the fact that it runs rough when it does start.

I don't mind tracking down gremlins (fuel system, air leaks, coolant, sensors, electrical, etc.) but I really need to make sure this isn't symptomatic of a bigger problem (ie. head gasket or failing engine). What should I look for specifically on this engine to make sure it's not going tits up? Obviously check exhaust smell and color, check coolant for oil and oil for coolant, look for obvious oil or coolant leaks, but beyond the usual stuff, are there any other telltale signs on the 22r specifically that will give me an idea of it's overall health?

Also, any other common catastrophic things I should look out for? I know some of these had issues with rusted frames. What else? I usually get vehicles checked out by a mechanic before purchasing, but every decent shop is INSANELY busy right now, and this is priced such that it's gunna go FAST...so I think I'm on my own for diagnosis. Thanks fellas!

Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design Automotive tire Vehicle


Automotive tire Tread Tire Bumper Synthetic rubber


Wheel Automotive parking light Tire Vehicle Automotive side marker light
21 - 32 of 32 Posts

· just a nobody
Echo
Joined
·
9,835 Posts
Haven't spend much time into the aftermarket conversion kits, so don't know how they are setup!
Nevertheless, if the fuel mapping is incorrect, like running too lean for example, would cause higher combustion temperature. Higher combustion temperature without EGR could cause pre-ignition. Pre-ignition is not good for engines!
 

· One with the farce
Joined
·
4,271 Posts
Remember the 22r is just a basic engine with no power to be gained from high rpm. You’ll read online about people making ridiculous power at high rpm, but of course somehow they misplaced the nonexistent dyno sheets lol. With an aftermarket efi fixed map system, there’s no feedback for throttle position or even knock sensor (in the 22r) so you’d be better off getting the 22RE intake and run a standalone ecu. Really your best bet is to run the Weber and make sure everything is tuned up properly, then save up for efi if you want to go that route later on.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Thanks
for all the replies. Still leaning towards a Weber 32/36. Called LCE. Dude asked what I'd be using it for, I said "mostly daily, very light off-roading, and I'd like to use it with my offy dual port"....he suggested a Weber 38. Okay, now I've gotta question WHY?? Is it because the 38 is like twice as expensive as a 32/36? That seems like a bad choice for a mostly DD with light off-roading....big sacrifice in mpg for little gain in power. He said yeah that's probably true, and that he runs a 32/36 on his own rig, so that's prolly the way to go. Okay, soooooo, why suggest a 38 in the first place??? It's like when you go to a restaurant and they just happen to highly recommend the most expensive thing on the menu....hmmmmmmm.....

I asked about the Holley EFI....he just said they don't carry them and they're hard to tune. I suspect the reason they don't recommend them has more to do with the former than it does the latter. But they do carry Holley carbs....so I'm sure they could get the EFI if they wanted? Who knows.

So I'll get the Weber, install it with the offy dual port, see how it runs. If it runs great, then great, I'm set. If I'm not happy with it, might try the Holley EFI....or rebuild the stock asin and try that.

Thanks fellas!
 

· One with the farce
Joined
·
4,271 Posts
Lol exactly, maybe because everyone thinks the bigger one is better? The 32/36 used to be the go-to carb for any carbureted 4 banger, can’t really go wrong with it unless you buy a used carb that’s worn out and been sitting in someone’s junk pile for 20 years. There’s the manual choke and electric choke version, consider what you want. I’ve had the manual choke version and kinda wished I’d gotten the electric choke style, but to each his own.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
Generally I would follow the advice of LCE. They are probably the most knowledgeable people in the US when it comes to the 20R/22R/22RE engines. A Weber is a nice, easy, and relatively inexpensive solution which should serve you very well for years.

From what I've seen on the TV shows, the Holly EFI system seems like a pretty easy DYI setup, but it will probably cost you 3X-4X the price of your Weber, and I'm not sure you'll see a significant improvement in performance. At least not in a 22R. I had a 22R-E, and I threw almost every bolt on LCE sold (cam, header, larger TB, K&N, etc.), and probably only gained about 10-15 hp...lol

Not sure about the 22R, but if it has a single roller timing chain, you might want to spring for the dual roller conversion kit from LCE. That will give you the reliability of the older 20Rs. I highly recommend it for anyone who has a 22RE.
 

· One with the farce
Joined
·
4,271 Posts
85+ 22r/re all single row chain with plastic guides. Cheap insurance to replace them minimum using new single chain setup, and double row with steel backed guides if you want to never worry about it again. I think there are complete conversion kits for that.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
277 Posts
85+ 22r/re all single row chain with plastic guides. Cheap insurance to replace them minimum using new single chain setup, and double row with steel backed guides if you want to never worry about it again. I think there are complete conversion kits for that.
I had the LCE conversion kit sitting on the shelf when my 22RE lost a couple of teeth on the timing chain cog. I had purchased the kit a few weeks before the teeth broke. That was almost perfect timing. Unfortunately my truck was totaled by a semi in 2008, so I replaced it with a new Tacoma. Whoever got that engine from the salvage yard got a deal. It only had about 120K miles, so it was barely broken in. After the timing chain upgrade, it was probably good for at least 500K+ miles.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Lol exactly, maybe because everyone thinks the bigger one is better? The 32/36 used to be the go-to carb for any carbureted 4 banger, can’t really go wrong with it unless you buy a used carb that’s worn out and been sitting in someone’s junk pile for 20 years. There’s the manual choke and electric choke version, consider what you want. I’ve had the manual choke version and kinda wished I’d gotten the electric choke style, but to each his own.
Heh....well I actually did end up buying a used Weber, mainly because the new "genuine Webers" sold in North America are usually made in China. It's a big rabbit hole if anyone cares to explore, but basically Weber "officially licensed" their name to a bunch of companies to make "legit Weber branded" carbs. So yeah, they're technically "genuine Webers"....but in name only.

I got an older one stamped "Made In Spain" that was taken off a 22r. It's in pretty good shape, but I'll throw it in an ultrasonic bath with simple green for 30-40 mins, then a rinse cycle in the ultrasonic with distilled water, then hit it with carb cleaner before install....should be good.

I could've picked up a REAL Weber made by Weber in Spain, but it was gunna be like $450....that's crazy. This one cost $100 shipped.....that leaves a lot in the budget to take it to a pro if needed and probably still come out ahead.
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top