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1990 Toyota Corolla
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Discussion Starter #1
It is time for me to change the timing belt on my 1990 sedan. I have read over the procedures on the Haynes manual and the factory service manual. Of course, written word and expericence are very different things. How difficult is it for a newbie with some car experience to do this job. I just plan on replacing the belt at this time. I want to see whether it is within my skill level, or if I need to take her to a shop.:eek::

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For a person who carefully follows directions, I think the biggest problem is getting the nut tht holds the crank pulley off. It's simplest to use an impact wrench and I say this even though I normally avoid using them. I haven't found a "harmonic balancer" removal tool in the local auto parts stores that works for this job.

People often say to inspect your belt and don't change it unless that is needed. The problem with this is that it assumes you are familiar with what a bad belt looks like. Also if you want to inspect the whole belt, you must remove the top of the belt guard then then turn the engine or remove the whole belt guard and that puts you close to changing the belt anyway.
 

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tashirosgt said:
For a person who carefully follows directions, I think the biggest problem is getting the nut tht holds the crank pulley off. It's simplest to use an impact wrench and I say this even though I normally avoid using them. I haven't found a "harmonic balancer" removal tool in the local auto parts stores that works for this job.

People often say to inspect your belt and don't change it unless that is needed. The problem with this is that it assumes you are familiar with what a bad belt looks like. Also if you want to inspect the whole belt, you must remove the top of the belt guard then then turn the engine or remove the whole belt guard and that puts you close to changing the belt anyway.
You don't need to pull off any pulleys... who told you that??
:confused: :confused:

I would say the a big concern would be for newbies to know how to set belt tension..
if you mark the spot what the tenisioner sits before you loosen it it wil help you set the proper tension with the new one...
Auto shops have special belt tension tools to get it exactly right, in the home garage, you go by knowledge and experience..
 

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1990 Toyota Corolla
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Discussion Starter #4
I guess when it warms up, I'll tear into it. The belt was due for change about 10K ago, so I should replace it soon. I'll be reading and memorizing the procedure so it is as easy as possible when the time comes. I just plan to replace the belt at this time since I have a trip coming up and I dont want to get stuck in the middle of nowhere. The car is pretty much bullet proof, but I dont want to take any chances of getting stuck because of a $15 belt.
 

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I replaced the TB in my 91 sedan two months ago. It was my first TB changeout, and, thankfully, it went well. I also changed the cam and crankshaft seals, water pump, and tensioner pulley. I found an "HSN" type TB which is rated at 100K miles. The standard OEM belts are only rated at 60K. From my readings before the procedure, the crankshaft bolt was a concern. However, using my impact gun made it a breeze. The most difficult part was removing and reinstalling the water pump. You shouldn't have any trouble if you take your time and follow the procedures. Just ensure that after you rotate the crankshaft to the alignment marks, mark the TB, crank pulley, and cam pulley with "White-Out" or something. Then, transfer the marks to the new TB and install. Also, install new o-rings with the water pump.
 

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On second thought, you may have to remove or loosen the water pump pulley, but since you might change that anyways,, than no big deal. You must remove the bolts for the exhaust manifold, because you will need to raise the engine to get the water pump off, if I remember right... so you wil also need to remove that motor mount bolt too in the area. Othwise, no need to remove any othe pulleys at all.

I put 150,000 miles on the last timing belt. I don't advise going over 100,000 miles on a timing belt. just for the chance of it breaking on the road. And, by the way, This toyota gave no warning when either a water pump or timing belt went bad. They just did it.

1989 Toyota Corolla SR5.
312,000 miles.
:disappoin or should I put a smiley??
:cool:
 
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retiredat44 said:
On second thought, you may have to remove or loosen the water pump pulley, but since you might change that anyways,, than no big deal. You must remove the bolts for the exhaust manifold, because you will need to raise the engine to get the water pump off, if I remember right... so you wil also need to remove that motor mount bolt too in the area. Othwise, no need to remove any othe pulleys at all.

I put 150,000 miles on the last timing belt. I don't advise going over 100,000 miles on a timing belt. just for the chance of it breaking on the road. And, by the way, This toyota gave no warning when either a water pump or timing belt went bad. They just did it.

1989 Toyota Corolla SR5.
312,000 miles.
:disappoin or should I put a smiley??
:cool:
you dont have to remove the exaust manifold, but you do need to raise the car, and remove the passanger motor mount (support the engine using a 4/4 and a jack). i suggest soaking the crank pulley bolt in wd-40. rumor is their put on at 200ft/lb, so impact is your best friend :)
 

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ghost_ryder35 said:
you dont have to remove the exaust manifold, but you do need to raise the car, and remove the passanger motor mount (support the engine using a 4/4 and a jack). i suggest soaking the crank pulley bolt in wd-40. rumor is their put on at 200ft/lb, so impact is your best friend :)
you will need to remove those bolts on the exhaust manifold because when you raise the engine, the stress on the exhaust flew pipe ruins the exhaust flex-pipe, then it leaks,,, it is high stress.... raising the engine,..... with a hydraulic jack or chain, you may not even notice the stress and damage you cause while lifting it...

what do you think happens to the exhaust while you Raise an Engine :confused:


You don't have to if you think you don't need to....
 
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