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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've pulled out a old starter (1.4 kW) from a wrecker, cleaned it up and have mostly disassembled it..I see from other threads how to replace the new contacts, and have done so...

Having a hell of a time removing the screws from the starter housing...I've stripped one head of a screw and am attempting to remove it with a 'stripped screw remover' drill tool and lots of penetrant spray. Any other suggestions?

Also, I've separated the field coil from the end cover to replace the brushes and I see that the brushes that are on the brush holder are pressed between steel clips and the brushes on the field coil look like they are on a clip that was pressed on to the brush wire with a press machine. Does anyone know how I can separate these without damaging the field coil or the brush holder?

All I know is my wife says I can't do any more automotive work on the kitchen table...I tell ya...make one little dent....
 

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ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
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I think the guy who started this thread (http://www.toyotanation.com/forum/t27312.html) is a rebuilder, so you might want to send him a PM. Penetrant and patience is always a good idea. If the screw head is raised from the surface, as opposed to set into a recess, you might be able to grind or file off the head, finish the disassembly, and get a replacement screw from another unit.

One of the reasons I rarely tear down a starter or alternator is the lack of parts available on the retail market. A couple of years ago, I searched for a source for the contacts, and ended up going to my rebuilder and buying a set!

About the rebuilding business: it's a closed group. They have a newspaper their association publishes called the "exchange" run by an outfit in Kansas. I've written a couple of articles for them, mostly in answer to a very left-leaning columnist to discuss the changing economic climate for rebuilding. There has been an influx of inexpensive offshore auto parts that has made rebuilding a more difficult business in which to make any profit. Parts are sold by distributors who vette you as rebuilder and sell to you in quantity only. With the rise of the internet, you will no doubt see more parts available from individual rebuilders on ebay, but places like auto zone or pep boys just cant cover the variety of parts most of us would want to rebuild a unit.

I hope to get back to Calgary one day for the Stampede. I was there with the jet a few years back, but it was just an overnight in the winter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks again timebuilder...Those screws are just frustrating me...I don't see why Toyota didn't use long bolts instead of screws..then at least i could use my impact gun.I'll drop him a message and see if he has any suggestions.
We've got a store up here called Cooper Bros, that specializes in Starter/Alternator rebuild parts. They've got a huge storeroom. I'd tried all the big stores and their only suggestion was buy a rebuilt....bet their suggestion for a flat tire is to buy a new tire too....
 

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The removal of gear housing (drive) to solenoid screws requires number 3 phillips bit and anvil type impact driver. When I did my, I set the impact tool, placed the bit in the screw, held starter on the top, anvil on the buttom and then hit the hard floor few times with the anvil. After third blow the screws came loose.
Some suggestions:
  1. Make sure that main contacts are not crooked and protruding equal amount
  2. Inspect pinion and flywheel
  3. Put a small amount of grease into the rear motor bearing, don't use open bearing as a replacement
  4. If brushes are crimped to the stator winding, the complete stator housing needs to be changed
  5. Make sure the ball at the end of plunger is not dislocated from its place.
 

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Pickup a handheld impact wrench that can hold a hex bit. The kind you hit with a hammer. Find a hex bit that fits the fastener end snugly and have at it. There are also hex bits designed with serrations on their faces to really bite into the fastener head.
 

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ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
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toyomoho said:
Pickup a handheld impact wrench that can hold a hex bit. The kind you hit with a hammer. Find a hex bit that fits the fastener end snugly and have at it. There are also hex bits designed with serrations on their faces to really bite into the fastener head.

That type of impact drive is made by Lisle:

http://www.lislecorp.com/tool_detail.cfm?detail=414

The bits used for phillips screws with serrations to prevent cam-out are called "ACR" bits.
 

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Copper is easy to solder to, but make sure that joint is strong.
 
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