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Car Newbie/Enthusiast!
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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys, I have a 2000 Toyota Camry. I had the IAC valve cleaned, changed the spark plugs, and sparkplug wires, checked all the vacuum lines and replaced a ripped one but the car kept stalling and now it is not starting, also it seems like the battery is dead because the windows aren't going down when the key is in the ignition. Does anyone have any suggestions of where to start or could it be possibly anything at this point? I am going to try and jump start the car but I am afraid it will not be starting again in the morning.Thank you for your help.
 

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Car Newbie/Enthusiast!
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Discussion Starter #3
I tried to jump start it myself, it didnt work for some reason. :/ Then I called AAA and they were able to jumpstart it and they did a test on the battery and charging system and they said I need to replace the battery because its reading 12.4V. The battery has been fine and I've been starting it once a day without a problem! I recently took the car to a couple mechanics and now the battery is having this issue. Is there any chance this is something one of the mechanics accidentally tripped while trying to diagnose my car, or is this random bad luck!
 

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'00 4 Cyl. Auto Camry LE
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Everything else being equal on a 20 yr. old vehicle - recommend checking the battery terminals, and cleaning the (primary) negative ground points from the battery terminal -> to the motor, and body frame as part of the battery replacement.

If the condition of the battery terminals shows corrosion, calcifying, etc. in the terminal assembly - I would replace (both) terminals with OEM new.

re: multiple mechanics worked on vehicle, now will not start - have you contacted the (2nd) mechanic that worked on the vehicle to advise / for feedback?

Did you advise either / both mechanics that you had (manually) adjusted the Thottle Body stop screw yourself, prior to any mechanic involvement? ...

The TPS sensor range / throttle body stop screw may need to be adjusted / reset, which is why I mention it here.
 

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Car Newbie/Enthusiast!
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Discussion Starter #5
It was actually one of the mechanics who adjusted that screw. Do you think that has to do with the battery?
 

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1995 Camry LE Wagon
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It was actually one of the mechanics who adjusted that screw. Do you think that has to do with the battery?
No, he was trying to stop the stalling - don't go back to him and set the screw back to factory adjustment. Stalling still could be a vacuum leak. Can you keep the engine running depressing the gas pedal?
 

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2006 Corolla XRS
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6,917 Posts
Since you cleaned your IAC, did you also clean the throttle body as well? Won't hurt to also clean the maf too.
 

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A car battery will give you about 2-5 years of good starting. If the battery is going bad, get a new battery before troubleshooting the other issues. A bad battery can cause all kind of red herring issues.

MAF should be cleaned via MAF sensor cleaner. Usually use CRC 05610 Mass Air Flow Sensor Cleaner.
 

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'00 4 Cyl. Auto Camry LE
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851 Posts
It was actually one of the mechanics who adjusted that screw. Do you think that has to do with the battery?
Sorry, was going by your previous statement in this thread:


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No, don't think this is "directly" related to the Battery issue. Although if the Throttle cable, TPS, and TB stop screw settings have been altered to the point where they are "fighting" each other on starting - the extended cranking will drain down the battery, as you are well aware. On a Battery that is older, but still "servicable", all that cranking has an effect / impact on battery life.

The "windows not going down" statement is why I recommended visually inspecting the Battery Terminals, and cleaning ground points, in addition to any replacement Battery you install.

On the 4 cyl. 2000 Camry here, the (original OEM) "split design" battery terminals were corroded (internally) under the plastic covers that encase the metal part of the terminal, both terminals were degraded badly. Installing new OEM terminals and cleaning primary ground points from the battery made a huge difference - restoring the vehicle's electrical system to factory-spec improved all electrical system functions, including headlamps, power windows, etc., in my case here.

Best advice I can offer is to use an analog Ohm/Voltmeter or DVOM (Digital Volt/Ohm Meter) to measure: Battery voltage directly at the battery w/ terminals disconnect, at the Battery w/ terminals connected / not running, and at the battery terminals, while running. Those readings will give you a better sense of the condition of Battery, battery terminals / cables, and health of the charging system.
 
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