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Have a 2001 Camry 4 cylinder. Recently it started exhibiting a strange problem out of the blue. When the car hasn't warmed up yet...just started out driving...if I crank the fan all the way up to high it causes the engine to try to stall...If I'm sitting at a stop sign at idle....it will start "hunting"....rpm's going up and down almost stalling out....if I turn the fan back down then the engine runs normal. After a short period and giving it some throttle then it goes back to normal even if the fan is cranked up. What the hell could cause that? Turning the fan on just makes the blower motor spin faster...that shouldn't have any effect on the engine? Otherwise the car runs fine. It has 167000 miles on it. No CEL or codes are showing up. Appreciate any suggestions. Thanks
 

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Have a 2001 Camry 4 cylinder. Recently it started exhibiting a strange problem out of the blue. When the car hasn't warmed up yet...just started out driving...if I crank the fan all the way up to high it causes the engine to try to stall...If I'm sitting at a stop sign at idle....it will start "hunting"....rpm's going up and down almost stalling out....if I turn the fan back down then the engine runs normal. After a short period and giving it some throttle then it goes back to normal even if the fan is cranked up. What the hell could cause that? Turning the fan on just makes the blower motor spin faster...that shouldn't have any effect on the engine? Otherwise the car runs fine. It has 167000 miles on it. No CEL or codes are showing up. Appreciate any suggestions. Thanks
My '95 would stall out when I turned on headlights sometimes (like on the highway...at 70 MPH). I replaced the positive battery terminal with a brand-new one from the dealer, used new fasteners and used a Dremel and brass + nylon brushes to clean off all the rust. That fixed it.

Another time, same issue as yours, turned out to be a weak alternator. Have your alternator and battery tested at AutoZone or equivalent.
 

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Thanks. I thought someone might mention the IAC valve. I replaced mine probably a year and a half ago cuz I was having some idling issues..but not related to turning the fan on high. I can clean up the throttle body and IAC again and see if that helps.
 

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How old is your battery? ... When you start the car, the battery is discharged to some extent, and takes a while to be recharged by the alternator. So, get a load test on the battery, clean and tighten the cable clamps, and check the voltage on the battery as it charges ... needs to be about 14 volts.
 

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Yes, that could be it as well. I've had cars that had a failing alternator which allowed me to drain the battery enough to cause the car to stall/idle extremely low with my headlights on and caused my stereo system to keep randomly tunring off. All this while the 'CHARGE' indicator was not triggered.
 

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yep, test at the batt posts. 12.6 engine off, 14.2 engine running.
if less than 12vdc with engine off, then charge/replace the battery.
if less than 14.2 with engine running, then rebuild/replace alternator.
of course this assumes you have good clean connections at the battery cable ends and alternator connections and good cables internally.

lastly, if all else checks out, ensure your grounds are intact with voltage drop testing under load to ensure you have no more than about .3 vdc loss in the cables. this testing method is more accurate than ohming out the cables for resistance.
tony
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
yep, test at the batt posts. 12.6 engine off, 14.2 engine running.
if less than 12vdc with engine off, then charge/replace the battery.
if less than 14.2 with engine running, then rebuild/replace alternator.
of course this assumes you have good clean connections at the battery cable ends and alternator connections and good cables internally.

lastly, if all else checks out, ensure your grounds are intact with voltage drop testing under load to ensure you have no more than about .3 vdc loss in the cables. this testing method is more accurate than ohming out the cables for resistance.
tony
Thanks. I'll check all that. Now that everyone mentions all this I do remember a couple of years ago I was having some issues where the lights would dim randomly. I ended up replacing the alternator...that was about 1.5 years ago. Have not experienced that issue again. I do recall cleaning and checking all ground connections and in fact I believe I ended up replacing both positive and negative battery cables as well. Anyway...I'll check all that out again...maybe a bad ground connection that I can tighten up. Thanks again
 

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'00 4 Cyl. Auto Camry LE
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If basic maintenance on terminals/connections doesn't help, depending on battery age, it may be nearing EOL -> time for replacement..

* But you might also want to consider replacing the blower resistor also - that part also seems to degrade (rust) w/ age & use - it was pretty spent on the camry here when replaced.

The one here wasn't quite as bad as this one, but close..

 

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Should have mentioned...the blower resistor blows about twice a year. I keep a spare one hand and cycle them in...resoldering the pin every time.
Have you replaced the Blower Motor at all ?

Blowing the resistor pack would indicate poor/bad ground to the motor, short in switch assembly or wiring -> to resistor pack, or issue w/ the Blower Motor itself (electrical) or assembly (binding fan cage, etc.)
 

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Have you replaced the Blower Motor at all
^^^

Yes, that's my next question. Electric motors draw a lot of current on start-up, less when running and under less load. If your motor is defective and/or has high bearing friction then it could be drawing more current than designed, that's why (baring a short) you're blowing the fuse. High speed draws the most current.

I'd recommend replacing the motor.
 

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extraordinary high current draw is usually due to bad grounds or bad wires. my 94 still has it's oem resistor in it, so your failure doesn't have to be due to age.
start measuring out your grounds everywhere. get a haynes or fsm and it shows locations of the grounding terminals.
tony
 

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You really shouldn't have to be replacing the blower motor and/or the resistor every few years. I mean it is a wear and tear item but dammnnn

Something is going on electrical. If the car runs fine now, did the issue of the stalling occur when it was raining, cold, hot, etc?
 

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If I had to guess, given that you have replaced the blower motor, the resistor pack keeps failing, and the (+) side of the circuit seems to be working ok (blower switch, wiring, fuses) - agree that the blower motor ground wire (-) is suspect and/or compromised.

A 'quick fix' would be to source both a donor replacement blower resistor connector, and blower motor connector from a pick-n-pull, restore the blower resistor connector back to factory (solder / use shrink wrap tubing / make it a durable repair),

then remove the blower motor ground wire for the donor motor connector, and run a bypass: route the blower motor ground connector to a good ground point on the side dash frame on the passenger side.

Remove the other wire(s) from the original connector, install in the donor motor connector, so you don't have to splice them / cut any factory wiring.

( IIRC, there is a ground point bolt already there on that side, either under the passenger kick panel, or somewhere above the kick panel on that side.. It's been awhile since I climbed under the dash panel.)

Running a new (clean) ground to the blower motor may help - if the (original) issue that caused this was severe enough to melt the resistor pack connector, chances are good the motor ground wire was affected / charred inside: either immediately at the motor ground spade connector, or for some distance below it.

* Using a DVOM meter w/ resistance test would help, but best way I've found to check would be to slit the insulation sheath open, expose the blower motor ground wiring @ the spade lug connector -> a few inches below, and visually inspect to verify.. Any (dark brown/black) charring of wire, or (green) corrosion present, would be a telltale indicator the wire was compromised. * But I would have a bypass wire made up and ready to go ( a "Plan B" ), before doing any kind of post-mortem, on the original wire.

Hope this helps.
 
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