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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I bought new headlamps for my car because one is cracked and the other is extremely foggy. I got replacement headlamps cheap from eBay, they are made by Spyder and are brand spanking new.

I've f** up, these headlamps are not meant for my Japanese built Camry, even though I double checked part numbers and confirmed with seller using details and VIN. This is a no refund, no return item and seller is ignoring me. I may get my money back from eBay but I still have the headlamp.

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Do you think I could make this work using harnesses or splicing? Or maybe making custom adapters. Please help
 

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2004Toyota Camry V6
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Look for replacements from salvage yards. 2002/2006 should all be the same. Harness splicing I would avoid.
 

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And while I agree with Mr. George about salvage yards, what I'd be looking for is just the receptacle for the center headlamp that would allow it to do the standard "twist-in" like the other two do. It looks like that's the only one that is problematic.

I have no problem with splicing a new connector on, but if you do that I would solder the splice before taping it up or using small wire nuts.
 

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Deejay Bizeek MIXIN IT UP
2004 Camry
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32 Posts
How does the Spyder front ones look like? Blacked out trim with chrome at the reflectors? The new ones look like they fit the USA made/Kentucky built models.


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Discussion Starter #5
Look for replacements from salvage yards. 2002/2006 should all be the same. Harness splicing I would avoid.
I'll see what I can find but salvage yards aren't brand new headlights and I'm just desperate on not wasting this set of headlamps, they look so clean and make my car look brand new.

Just out of interest, could you explain why harness splicing should be avoided?

And while I agree with Mr. George about salvage yards, what I'd be looking for is just the receptacle for the center headlamp that would allow it to do the standard "twist-in" like the other two do. It looks like that's the only one that is problematic.

I have no problem with splicing a new connector on, but if you do that I would solder the splice before taping it up or using small wire nuts.
Have tried looking for the part but cannot find it, not from salvage yards or ebay or japanese part stores. Can I do a "retrofit" somehow?

How does the Spyder front ones look like? Blacked out trim with chrome at the reflectors? The new ones look like they fit the USA made/Kentucky built models.


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Not the blacked out, just the standard factory chrome. Seller claimed they fit my car and even gave me the false part number. I can now see these are for the US Kentucky built models. Great headlamps, bolt and fit perfectly in my car but I cannot install the headlights inside.

This is what they look like

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Mr. Roo
Lexus IS300
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11,246 Posts
what do the original head lights look like? That one you've got marked as "original" is not using the stock headlight bulb for some reason, and it looks like it's got a wiring adapter. I think you just have to get that one light bulb, and then it should all work. No need to change any wiring. Take a pic from the front!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
what do the original head lights look like? That one you've got marked as "original" is not using the stock headlight bulb for some reason, and it looks like it's got a wiring adapter. I think you just have to get that one light bulb, and then it should all work. No need to change any wiring. Take a pic from the front!
I'll see if I can find that adapter

Heres the headlamp from the front (original factory). I've had a local garage "restore" them but I saw them using sandpaper. Have a feeling these wont last long

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Thank you all for the help, I'll look for the adapter so I can install the new lamps
 

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It's common practice to "sand the fog" off of plastic headlamp lenses. You generally get about as much time as it took for the previous yellowing/fogging to occur unless you apply a sealant that has a UV barrier, and reapply it at regular intervals.

On my Solara, it is really weird because the lenses were crystal clear and I did apply Turtle Wax's restore/preserve earlier this year, but the top of the lenses, and only the top (above the crease) hazed and yellowed incredibly quickly. I just used a cutting compound that jewelers use called Krystal Kleer to remove that yesterday, and have applied a spray on ceramic coating afterward. If this yellows as quickly again then I will look specifically for something with UV protection. I just haven't gotten around to that yet.

Your life will be much easier if you do get the correct connector for that one headlamp that will allow you to use the typical "twist in/out" style connection like the other two lamps use. It's been virtually standard for a long time now, and I'm mystified as to why the Japanese issue cars weren't using it for all the lamps. It's very odd that they weren't. Or at least it's odd if these are standard headlamp bulbs. If the car came equipped with Xenon bulbs or similar there may have been a different mounting arrangement for heat dissipation purposes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
It's common practice to "sand the fog" off of plastic headlamp lenses. You generally get about as much time as it took for the previous yellowing/fogging to occur unless you apply a sealant that has a UV barrier, and reapply it at regular intervals.

On my Solara, it is really weird because the lenses were crystal clear and I did apply Turtle Wax's restore/preserve earlier this year, but the top of the lenses, and only the top (above the crease) hazed and yellowed incredibly quickly. I just used a cutting compound that jewelers use called Krystal Kleer to remove that yesterday, and have applied a spray on ceramic coating afterward. If this yellows as quickly again then I will look specifically for something with UV protection. I just haven't gotten around to that yet.

Your life will be much easier if you do get the correct connector for that one headlamp that will allow you to use the typical "twist in/out" style connection like the other two lamps use. It's been virtually standard for a long time now, and I'm mystified as to why the Japanese issue cars weren't using it for all the lamps. It's very odd that they weren't. Or at least it's odd if these are standard headlamp bulbs. If the car came equipped with Xenon bulbs or similar there may have been a different mounting arrangement for heat dissipation purposes.
I heard about the spray on UV coating or using a clear plastic UV coating film on the headlamps after restoring them, however I saw the most of the restoring, they only used sandpaper, water and cloths.

I like the use of jeweler cutting compound. Might give that a try and buy UV coating spray/film.

I'll find the connector because I see it's just the one bulb that has issue. I have no idea why the originals are like this. The car was built in Japan, is a 2003 model, V6 4speed. I wonder why JP built and Kentucky built models have different headlamp bulb harnesses.
 
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