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Planohog
06 taco, 94 F250
Joined
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81 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been watching on several boards about the tacoma lift issue, I first became
interested in this when I discovered my Access cab with cap squats with camping gear,

I found this part of information that I would like to get a discussion started with.
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Suspension modifications in the 0-3.5" lift range are achieved by modifying the coilover assemblies. On these vehicles the front spring and shock absorber are contained in one unit, referred to as a strut or coilover assembly. Most of these vehicle came equipped with an automatic 4WD front hub option, known as ADD (Automatic Differential Disconnect). With the ADD system it is not recommended to exceed 2.5" of lift height. Lifting the vehicle 2.5" - 3.5" is only recommended on vehicles with factory manual hubs or the ORS Manual Hub Conversion kit.

http://www.offroadsolutions.com/technicalarticles/tacoma_suspension_upgrades.htm

I realize that this could be just upsale verbage -tmoore
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A few of the questions I have with the tacoma is fixed by the aftermarket upper control
arm replacement.

from article:

Many people that use their trucks for trail use and run a front coilover lift system have problems with upper ball joint failure, alignment angles, and lack of suspension travel. The Total Chaos upper control arm replacement kit is designed to address these problems..

yea I see it as a possible add for TC

OK , next thing, what about the angle of the drive shaft from center of front tire
to differential ( CV JOINT ) and angles of steering end angles.

how are these items affected with the very common 3" toytech lift
http://www.toyteclifts.com/

or any of high end lift systems for example dohaohoe
http://www.donahoeracing.com


--tmoore
 

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Trevor
Joined
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2,026 Posts
1) Most of that applies to the older gen Tacoma's. The CV angles where not as forgiving as the new trucks. They where shorter and were effected by lift more dramatically. That first statement is considering the CV joints which is why they mentioned manual hubs. With manual hubs you can totally disconnect the front CV's from the wheel where with ADD they are always spinning. With the 05+ trucks the CV's angles are good up to 3" of lift, of course when ever you take something an push it outside of the designed range increased wear is to be expected but it is minimal.

2) Depending on the type of lift you choose you can overextend you factory ball joints if pushed. Longer coils or top mount spacers coupled with a shock that allows for more down travel can push the ball joint outside of it's designed range of motion, which can of course lead to premature failure, most of the time though guys never reach that point stress to their trucks suspension.

3) Depending on how you drive your truck 3" of lift should not adversely effect you ball joints or your CV's. If you are running shocks that allow for increased down travel and you push your truck often enough to the point where the front wheels are lifted off the ground you may want to consider limiting straps so you don't overextend you CV's and upper ball joints.

As with anything when you change one thing it can effect another. For the average Joe most will never push their trucks to the point of failure, then again guys who do push their trucks could just as easily induce failure with a stock truck. With 3" of lift you just have to be more vigilant with maintenance, ensuring that you check for wear and deal with small issues before they become bigger problems.
 

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Ron Jeremy's twin brother
06 Tacoma-SOLD
Joined
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1,461 Posts
Great summary there AN.

planohog - For you personally, are you considering a lift to help offset the (rear) sagging you've seen with a cap and full load? Or have I misunderstood your intent?

Both OME and the CO like Donahoe have solutions that provide around 2" of lift if you want to play it safe. You could install the OME springs without the top plate spacer, and get 2-2.5", and of course the CO options like All Pro, SAW and Donahoe all have adjustable settings, but are typically in the 2-2.5" range.

So if you want to lift, but are concerned about some of the things you outlined, you can reduce those concerns by taking a more conservative lift approach.
 

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Planohog
06 taco, 94 F250
Joined
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81 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
screeber said:
Great summary there AN.

planohog - For you personally, are you considering a lift to help offset the (rear) sagging you've seen with a cap and full load? Or have I misunderstood your intent?

Both OME and the CO like Donahoe have solutions that provide around 2" of lift if you want to play it safe. You could install the OME springs without the top plate spacer, and get 2-2.5", and of course the CO options like All Pro, SAW and Donahoe all have adjustable settings, but are typically in the 2-2.5" range.

So if you want to lift, but are concerned about some of the things you outlined, you can reduce those concerns by taking a more conservative lift approach.

I wanted a little lift to get me through the deep ruts down at the beach
( padre-island national park) south of corpus christi texas PINS we call it.

I found with a loaded truck the TRD off road package is kinda wimpy. I dont haul
a$$ that much down there but when the tide is coming up to the dunes you got to
get where your going even if it mean 4 tires in the air at time

thanks for the great reply

-tmoore
 
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