Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
07 Toyota Corolla CE
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all! I don't post a ton on here, but I'm hoping for some advice before I go back to the tire shop...

Basically my 2007 Corolla CE has three different ages of tires on it. I know the best solution is to replace all four with a new set, but things are tight financially right now, so I need to try and make due for a few months at least.
The oldest tires are two from a full set of Firestone FR710's I got back in 2014. I purchased road hazard protection, which has helped financially but has left me with a headache.
Last spring/summer, I picked up a nail at some point and woke up to a completely flat tire. Firestone deemed it unrepairable, so they offered a prorated Toyo they had in stock. That was all fine at the time, and they installed the new tire on the rear. At some point I had my car in for an oil change and had my tires rotated and forgot to mention I had a mismatched tire that needed to remain on the rear, so the Toyo ended up as my front passenger tire. I didn't even really pay attention to it until the other night...

Living in Kansas, dirt roads are not uncommon. We've also had some ups and downs in the temperature over the last few weeks. My husband and I were doing a Facebook Marketplace meet in a city in the next county over. The quickest way there was county roads. On the way there, the roads were curvy but paved. Instead of taking the same way back, I let Google Maps do its thing. We came upon a dirt road, and having driven on them before, I thought nothing of it. No noticeable sound or anything, but suddenly my car was handling like I was on ice. Nothing too out of control, but I had to continually steer opposite of the way my car was pulling to stay straight. I took the next turn onto pavement, and there was a noticeable change in the road noise compared to normal. That was enough for me to pull over, and sure enough I had a visibly flat tire. AAA came to the rescue, and we made it home just fine. The tow truck driver didn't find a nail or any other debris, but it was at night.

So of course the next day I dropped my car off at Firestone, and I was still within my road hazard protection. Once again the tire was unrepairable (I'm starting to wonder if they always say that...), so I needed a replacement. At a prorated price, thats a lot less expensive than four new tires. I stupidly assumed they would check all my tires and place the now two newer ones on the rear. All they did was take the donut off and mount the new tire in its place.

So now I have two 3 year old tires on my driver's side, a newish tire on the front passenger, and a brand new tire on the rear passenger. The alignment seems fine on a cursory test at city speeds, but Kansas is prone to ice in the winter and hydroplane conditions during storms (been there, done that). Do I go back and ask them to move the tires around so the two oldest are on the front and the newest on the rear? I know that probably doesn't follow Toyota's rotation recommendation, but that assumes the tires are the same age and you're trying to even out the wear. That doesn't help a few thousand miles difference. I'd greatly appreciate your expertise!

tl;dr: Old tires on driver's side, newer on front passenger, and brand new on rear passenger. Best placement for safety with potential for ice and rain?
 

·
19 Corolla HB SE 6-spd
Joined
·
6,266 Posts
You just need to switch your newer on front passenger to rear driver's side... Such a long story is not necessary. I read less than a quarter of it.
 

·
The Return of the Red Coupe
2010 RAV4 V6
Joined
·
19,666 Posts
Since they're not directional tires, switch the new one from the rear passenger to the front driver side, this way your newer tires will be together up front. and the old ones in the rear.

In 6 months to a year, you'll want to do another rotation, this time do all 4 tires in an X pattern, front left to rear right, front right to rear left... now your newer tires are on the back and the older ones up front.

That should give you decent tread wear out of the set... if you can't switch the tire yourself, go to the tire place and tell them to do it so that you have the newer tires together.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top