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Yes there are a lot of anecdotal reports that changing an old automatic transmission's fluid will cause problems.
About the same as the number of Trans fluid changes that are done with either the wrong fluid (as when the lube shop uses their "universal" fluid and adds an additive for particular vehicles).

Simply replacing the fluid is always going to be good if the correct fluid and refill level is achieved.

I was also looking for the exact procedure for getting the oil temperature reading off the dash of a 2015 Camry 4-cyl, still looking for a concise procedure online since I wasn't clear on just when and how the pins get jumped and if the reading just suddenly pops up on the dash(?).
One YouTube presenter did show that his IR reading thermometer was in near-perfect agreement with the trans temp sensor, so there's that, but it would be convenient being able to shut the engine off at just the right time while watching the dash readout instead of perhaps climbing under the car again and again.
 

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I follow the Toyota maintenance channel on YouTube. Following his expertise , I did multiple drains and fills until the fluid was clean and clear . Definitely use Toyota transmission fluid , too . My vehicle called for WS fluid . I high recommend watching one of his automatic transmission service vlogs . There’s a wealth of knowledge to gain from him .
 

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Scotty kilmer mention a lots in his video repair " On a older car, never flush an transmission, you might remove the friction debris and cause more harm than good. It's better do the drain and refill and nothing else."
 

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There is no such thing as removing the friction debris... that is the most moronist thing anyone without a clue will say
 
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If you end up changing the fluid, consider sending a sample of the used fluid and the new fluid to a lab for analysis. They may identify signs of wear and tell you the used fluid was in desperate need of changing, or they may tell you the used fluid was fine as-is. Either way, the analysis should give you an idea of what you’re dealing with, and how often to change the fluid in the future.
Blackstone Labs will send you free test kits, and I believe it’s $30 per test when you submit them. I plan on doing this when I change the transmission fluid on our 2014 Corolla at about 100k.
Blackstone Labs
 

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Yes there are a lot of anecdotal reports that changing an old automatic transmission's fluid will cause problems.
About the same as the number of Trans fluid changes that are done with either the wrong fluid (as when the lube shop uses their "universal" fluid and adds an additive for particular vehicles).

Simply replacing the fluid is always going to be good if the correct fluid and refill level is achieved.

I was also looking for the exact procedure for getting the oil temperature reading off the dash of a 2015 Camry 4-cyl, still looking for a concise procedure online since I wasn't clear on just when and how the pins get jumped and if the reading just suddenly pops up on the dash(?).
One YouTube presenter did show that his IR reading thermometer was in near-perfect agreement with the trans temp sensor, so there's that, but it would be convenient being able to shut the engine off at just the right time while watching the dash readout instead of perhaps climbing under the car again and again.
1. I did the fluid level check following the 4/13 pins jumping method and verified it with checking the temperature at the bottom of the pan with an IR thermometer. When the fluid temperature reached 40 degrees Celsius according to the dash indicator the IR thermometer was displaying 38-39, so it checks indeed. For subsequent level checks I gave up on shorting the pins in the OBD2, the thermometer method is good enough for me. When the outside temperature in rather low there's plenty of time to undo the drain bolt and check the level, before the pan temperature goes above 45 degrees when you have to stop, wait for the fluid temperature to drop below 40 and start again.
2. The fluid level check should be done as per the manufacturer specifications. In the case of slushboxes with torque converter, if you turn off the engine some of the fluid in the TC will drain back in the pan thus the level will raise.
 

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1. I did the fluid level check following the 4/13 pins jumping method and verified it with checking the temperature at the bottom of the pan with an IR thermometer. When the fluid temperature reached 40 degrees Celsius according to the dash indicator the IR thermometer was displaying 38-39, so it checks indeed. For subsequent level checks I gave up on shorting the pins in the OBD2, the thermometer method is good enough for me. When the outside temperature in rather low there's plenty of time to undo the drain bolt and check the level, before the pan temperature goes above 45 degrees when you have to stop, wait for the fluid temperature to drop below 40 and start again.
2. The fluid level check should be done as per the manufacturer specifications. In the case of slushboxes with torque converter, if you turn off the engine some of the fluid in the TC will drain back in the pan thus the level will raise.
Thanks AurionX2 for replying about your experience with this!
 
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