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Discussion Starter #1
I poked through the manual and could not find a specification for grease to use on the chassis. Anybody have any idea what to use?

Also, anyone have a comprehensive list of locations of all the fittings?

Does a gen 7 Camry even have grease fittings?

Thanks!
Nic
 

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I don't think that there are any grease fittings on your car.
Even my 1997 Lincoln Town Car only had them at the Pitman arm, the rest of the pivots and the U-joints were all sealed for life.
About the only greasing left to do is the wheel bearings (when a brake job is performed) and at the hood release latch, door latches and hinges. Let your service manual be your guide, but don't fall for any "lifetime fill" service intervals on the automatic transmission.

Also, keep an eye on the CV joint boots, any tears will require a complete rebuild of the affected axle shaft joint.
 

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08 Toyota Camry 2AZ-FE R9K Tuned
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You can use any grease you want, you will find nearly no grease fittings on a current Toyota unless you have replaced a part that comes with grease fittings like sway bar links.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I don't think that there are any grease fittings on your car.
Even my 1997 Lincoln Town Car only had them at the Pitman arm, the rest of the pivots and the U-joints were all sealed for life.
About the only greasing left to do is the wheel bearings (when a brake job is performed) and at the hood release latch, door latches and hinges. Let your service manual be your guide, but don't fall for any "lifetime fill" service intervals on the automatic transmission.

Also, keep an eye on the CV joint boots, any tears will require a complete rebuild of the affected axle shaft joint.
You can use any grease you want, you will find nearly no grease fittings on a current Toyota unless you have replaced a part that comes with grease fittings like sway bar links.
D'oh. So when my suspension starts to sound sound creaky and/or I can feel a lot of play, then start searching for replacement parts with grease fittings (if there is a manufacturer who even makes them)?

As for the CV boots, so far I haven't noticed anything. I'm surprised I've never had to replace them. Are these something I should consider proactively replacing or just run to failure? Or if one fails, replace both or just one at a time, upon failure?
 

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08 Toyota Camry 2AZ-FE R9K Tuned
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D'oh. So when my suspension starts to sound sound creaky and/or I can feel a lot of play, then start searching for replacement parts with grease fittings (if there is a manufacturer who even makes them)?

As for the CV boots, so far I haven't noticed anything. I'm surprised I've never had to replace them. Are these something I should consider proactively replacing or just run to failure? Or if one fails, replace both or just one at a time, upon failure?
Moog makes a "majority" of parts with grease fittings. Some other manufacturers have them too. The only real difference between grease-able and non-grease-able is the owner's ability to add grease. I found that with my rear sway bar links (which are Moogs) that I can be negligent on them and they will still hold grease for awhile. I have also made sure to get grease fitting covers so that they do not rust.

There are two (or more) trains of thoughts of grease-able parts:
  • If the OEM part lasts 200,000 miles, then a non-grease-able replacement should be able to last another 100,000 miles if not another 200,000 miles.
  • If you replace it with a grease-able part, as long as you grease it should last... a very very long time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I don't think that there are any grease fittings on your car.
Even my 1997 Lincoln Town Car only had them at the Pitman arm, the rest of the pivots and the U-joints were all sealed for life.
About the only greasing left to do is the wheel bearings (when a brake job is performed) and at the hood release latch, door latches and hinges. Let your service manual be your guide, but don't fall for any "lifetime fill" service intervals on the automatic transmission.

Also, keep an eye on the CV joint boots, any tears will require a complete rebuild of the affected axle shaft joint.
I meant to ask earlier.... any input on whether to use genuine Toyota ATF-WS fluid when I do a change versus some other brand, such as Valvoline Synthetic fluid which claims to meet ATF-WS specifications (or any other non-Toyota branded fluid, synthetic or otherwise)?
 

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08 Toyota Camry 2AZ-FE R9K Tuned
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I meant to ask earlier.... any input on whether to use genuine Toyota ATF-WS fluid when I do a change versus some other brand, such as Valvoline Synthetic fluid which claims to meet ATF-WS specifications (or any other non-Toyota branded fluid, synthetic or otherwise)?
A lot of people like the MaxxLife, I prefer W/S for peace of mind since I know that is all that is in my transmission.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Okay, last question (or group of questions?) on the topic. Thank you for your continued patience.

I think I'm probably just going to use the Toyota branded non-synthetic fluid.

I think I have a good handle on the overall fluid exchange process:
  1. Shut off vehicle
  2. Raise, level, and safely support vehicle
  3. Verify fill plug can be removed
  4. Remove drain plug/tube, drain the pan, capturing the drained fluid and measure
  5. Reinstall drain plug/tube
  6. Add new fluid equal to the amount of old fluid removed
  7. Reinstall fill plug
  8. Drive/run the vehicle to circulate and mix the old and new fluid
  9. Repeat process until satisfied with the amount of fluid that has been exchanged
So my questions:
  • If this job has never been done, should I do a fluid level check before starting the exchange process, or should I do it at the end?
  • On my item #8: How much running/driving should be done to circulate? Just a few minutes of running and changing between forward and reverse gears or do I need to drive around the block, or even put a few miles on?
  • On my Item #9: If the capacity in the manual is 8 quarts, should I plan on exchanging around double that?
  • Finally, if I plan to change the filter as well, should I wait until I've completed the exchange and then change the filter (and of course add more fluid and do a level check afterwards) or should I change the filter at the very beginning?
Thanks,

Nic
 

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Master the fluid level checking procedure first. Then the pan drain and refill procedure. Toyota service literature recommends doing 3 pan drain and refills to replace most of the fluid. It does not recommend any fluid exhange procedure. Filter and magnet cleaning is not real important until car has 100,000 miles, but if replacing, do it during the 3rd and final pan drain and refill.
 
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