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Bought a 2017 DCSB 4X4 SR5 in July of 2017. Since then the truck has been in the shop 5 times for the same brake issue. Truck shakes when braking at high speeds of 50mph+ and has slight grabbing at slower speeds. Dealer has replaced rear drums 2x, and now is saying that my rear axle shaft is out of spec, and needs to be replaced.

At this point I would like to swap the truck out for a new one, since I think I have a lemon. Does anyone have experience with doing a buyback with Toyota? Can anyone send me some recommendations or how to get the process going?

Thanks
 

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2016 Corolla S Prem
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5x in the shop without resolution would most likely fall under your state's lemon laws.
Call an attorney, you will be forced into arbitration which may or may not give Toyota one more chance to fix it (and at this point, it may be pulled from your dealership and handed off to another dealer for repair)

Ultimately, if they can't fix it, you will likely be offered the choice between a cash buy-back, or a higher value compensation toward another Toyota.

My buddy went through that with a Jeep. He took the cash and bought a 4-Runner, the difference between cash and trade-in was $22k vs $26k (in 2003)
 

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I have this problem with my 17 DCSB and it’s been into dealer twice in the last 1.5 months. They couldn’t figure out what was wrong but keep turning the front rotors saying they think it’s got hot spots. I don’t tow anything or brake hard. Just wanted to post so I can see if anybody else knows a resolution.
 

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99 2.7l 4Runner; 16 Tacoma SR5
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Have they checked the front rotors ?? We've had the same "shudder" on our 98 & 99 4Runners and after a lot of investigation, different types of brake pads, etc., it was determined the front rotors were the problem. Once they replaced them, the problem went away.....
 

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Over-torquing the lug nuts while doing something as simple as a tire rotation can cause the rotors to warp and then you get a vibration/pulsing while braking. Most shops (dealers included) just jam them on with an air wrench. In a perfect world, they'd put the lug nut on just snug with a power tool and then finish the job with a torque wrench.

If the dealer doesn't want to hear that, tell them to look up T-SB-0313-17 on the subject. (Brake Vibration and Lug Nut Torque, 2015-2018 Models)

OEM rotors are often too thin to turn these days, so replacing them is the best bet, especially if they've been turned twice already.
 
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