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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I had little luck finding an ATF flush (vice drain and fill) procedure for my 2019 Camry XSE. So I did basically did the same as I did on my 2016 Tundra. I bought both of them used with a lot of miles and I suspect this was their first flush (at 93K and 140K respectively). It worked out well so I thought I'd post what I did here:

1. I put it on ramps in the front and jack stands in the back so that it was level. I used a level on the bottom of the door opening which was level when on level ground. Using jack stands in the front as well would let you take the left front tire off for better access.
2. Remove the big plastic panel underneath; I think 4 10mm screws across the front and several body clips other places.
3. Remove the plastic shroud in the left fender well - 2 10mm and a clip.
4. Loosen the fill plug (24mm).
5. Remove the downstream side of cooler outlet hose (part 5 on diagram if I can attach it) from tube; the other end of this hose goes to top rear of the cooler. Attached drain tubing to the hose with a male-male nipple and routed it to a drain pan.
Organism Gesture Font Auto part Circle


6. Remove the drain plug (10mm hex) and the level check straw (6mm hex) and drain fluid. I got about 2.5 quarts out (dirty and black). Surprisingly there is no magnet on the plug.
7. Re-install straw (15 in-lbs) and plug (just snug for now).
8. Added 4 quarts in fill hole with a hand pump.
9. Had wife start car and cycle 3 seconds in each gear while I watched 3 quarts of the nasty old fluid come out the tubing into an empty ATF jug (with visible level marks), then shut off engine.
10. Added 3 quarts, start car, drain 3. Repeat. I took out about 10.5 total and put in 11 before it started running out clean(er). Probably should have done another quart or two, just make sure to put in about 0.5 quart more than you take out so when you check the level, you get flow. I still had to put a little more in when checking level since I barely got flow and was worried.
11. Remove draining tube and reattach cooler hose.

To set fluid level:
1. Ensure vehicle is level and cool.
2. Loosen drain plug (not straw) or fill port (Tundra).
3. Pin cooler T-stat bypass (Tundra - no ATF T-stat on Camry).
4. Go into ATF temperature detection mode:
a. With ignition off, jumper OBD port terminals 13 to 4. (I'll attach a diagram if I can) I jumpered an OBD extension cable and then plugged it in to the port to make this easier than crawling under dash with a jumper wire.
Rectangle Font Parallel Pattern Slope


b. Start engine (CEL and others lights will blink) and slowly run through all gears and back to P.
c. Put into N, then go between D and N once per second for >= 6 seconds.
d. D (or maybe ATF Temp light) should stay lit for 2 seconds even though shifter is moving = success.
e. Put in P.
f. Remove jumper from OBD; this activates idle control. ATF temperature detection mode stays active until key is turned off.
g. Observe the indicator ("D" or ATF Temp light):
i. off = ATF too cold
ii. On = ATF in range
iii. Blinking = ATF to hot
5. Wait for light to come on; "D" for me. This took 5-10 minutes in 65F ambient, even after running the engine periodically to flush old fluid out.
6. As soon as light comes on, remove fill port (or plug, but not straw). If it starts blinking, let cool and start over.
7. Let drain until stream slows/changes or drips. Reinstall plug (36 ft-lbs)
8. If no fluid comes out while in temp range, you need to add fluid and repeat.

Hope this helps. Organism Gesture Font Auto part Circle
Rectangle Font Parallel Pattern Slope
 

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Great write up, clear and concise. Question: wouldn't it harm the transmission if its running and the transmission and the cooler run dry? 9. Had wife start car and cycle 3 seconds in each gear while I watched 3 quarts of the nasty old fluid come out the tubing into an empty ATF jug (with visible level marks). Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great write up, clear and concise. Question: wouldn't it harm the transmission if its running and the transmission and the cooler run dry? 9. Had wife start car and cycle 3 seconds in each gear while I watched 3 quarts of the nasty old fluid come out the tubing into an empty ATF jug (with visible level marks). Thanks!
You are 100% right - don't run it dry; I didn't. I'll edit it if I can. I drained leaving 1 quart in the pan and then refilled; I put in 4 quarts after initial full drain. Not to concerned about having it 1-2 quarts extra fluid in there during the flush - It's cold so less volume than when hot, it's at an idle and axle not turning so little chance to churn and froth the fluid, and it only runs a minute or two until drained back down.

When I did my 2004 Sienna (282K) a week ago, I did get a burb in the flow before shutting off the engine on one of the drains and learned my lesson to track the ins and outs better. But I don't expect much/any damage with very low load, very short time, and I'm sure everything stays coated with thin film of fluid.
 

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I had little luck finding an ATF flush (vice drain and fill) procedure for my 2019 Camry XSE. So I did basically did the same as I did on my 2016 Tundra. I bought both of them used with a lot of miles and I suspect this was their first flush (at 93K and 140K respectively). It worked out well so I thought I'd post what I did here: 1. I put it on ramps in the front and jack stands in the back so that it was level. I used a level on the bottom of the door opening which was level when on level ground. Using jack stands in the front as well would let you take the left front tire off for better access. 2. Remove the big plastic panel underneath; I think 4 10mm screws across the front and several body clips other places. 3. Remove the plastic shroud in the left fender well - 2 10mm and a clip. 4. Loosen the fill plug (24mm). 5. Remove the downstream side of cooler outlet hose (part 5 on diagram if I can attach it) from tube; the other end of this hose goes to top rear of the cooler. Attached drain tubing to the hose with a male-male nipple and routed it to a drain pan. View attachment 383957 6. Remove the drain plug (10mm hex) and the level check straw (6mm hex) and drain fluid. I got about 2.5 quarts out (dirty and black). Surprisingly there is no magnet on the plug. 7. Re-install straw (15 in-lbs) and plug (just snug for now). 8. Added 4 quarts in fill hole with a hand pump. 9. Had wife start car and cycle 3 seconds in each gear while I watched 3 quarts of the nasty old fluid come out the tubing into an empty ATF jug (with visible level marks), then shut off engine. 10. Added 3 quarts, start car, drain 3. Repeat. I took out about 10.5 total and put in 11 before it started running out clean(er). Probably should have done another quart or two, just make sure to put in about 0.5 quart more than you take out so when you check the level, you get flow. I still had to put a little more in when checking level since I barely got flow and was worried. 11. Remove draining tube and reattach cooler hose. To set fluid level: 1. Ensure vehicle is level and cool. 2. Loosen drain plug (not straw) or fill port (Tundra). 3. Pin cooler T-stat bypass (Tundra - no ATF T-stat on Camry). 4. Go into ATF temperature detection mode: a. With ignition off, jumper OBD port terminals 13 to 4. (I'll attach a diagram if I can) I jumpered an OBD extension cable and then plugged it in to the port to make this easier than crawling under dash with a jumper wire. View attachment 383958 b. Start engine (CEL and others lights will blink) and slowly run through all gears and back to P. c. Put into N, then go between D and N once per second for >= 6 seconds. d. D (or maybe ATF Temp light) should stay lit for 2 seconds even though shifter is moving = success. e. Put in P. f. Remove jumper from OBD; this activates idle control. ATF temperature detection mode stays active until key is turned off. g. Observe the indicator ("D" or ATF Temp light): i. off = ATF too cold ii. On = ATF in range iii. Blinking = ATF to hot 5. Wait for light to come on; "D" for me. This took 5-10 minutes in 65F ambient, even after running the engine periodically to flush old fluid out. 6. As soon as light comes on, remove fill port (or plug, but not straw). If it starts blinking, let cool and start over. 7. Let drain until stream slows/changes or drips. Reinstall plug (36 ft-lbs) 8. If no fluid comes out while in temp range, you need to add fluid and repeat. Hope this helps. View attachment 383956 View attachment 383958
Great description. What is the temperature range for checking the fluid level on the 8 speed transmissions? I know in previous generations it was 104-113 deg F.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Alright, my reply seemed to fail:
I think the temp is 95-114F, but just use the jumper and tranny shuffle technique that I described above and the car will tell you when it is correct. I was shooting the bottom of the tranny occasionally with an IR thermometer and it was around 100F when the "D" came on. The Toyota manual (per some excerpts I found) says to do it with the jumper method (if you don't have Tech Stream).
 

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Alright, my reply seemed to fail:
I think the temp is 95-114F, but just use the jumper and tranny shuffle technique that I described above and the car will tell you when it is correct. I was shooting the bottom of the tranny occasionally with an IR thermometer and it was around 100F when the "D" came on. The Toyota manual (per some excerpts I found) says to do it with the jumper method (if you don't have Tech Stream).
Thanks! I have a scan tool that reads live data including transmission fluid temp. Glad you confirmed that temp was 100F when the D came on. That's all I needed to know.
 

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I had little luck finding an ATF flush (vice drain and fill) procedure for my 2019 Camry XSE. So I did basically did the same as I did on my 2016 Tundra. I bought both of them used with a lot of miles and I suspect this was their first flush (at 93K and 140K respectively). It worked out well so I thought I'd post what I did here: 1. I put it on ramps in the front and jack stands in the back so that it was level. I used a level on the bottom of the door opening which was level when on level ground. Using jack stands in the front as well would let you take the left front tire off for better access. 2. Remove the big plastic panel underneath; I think 4 10mm screws across the front and several body clips other places. 3. Remove the plastic shroud in the left fender well - 2 10mm and a clip. 4. Loosen the fill plug (24mm). 5. Remove the downstream side of cooler outlet hose (part 5 on diagram if I can attach it) from tube; the other end of this hose goes to top rear of the cooler. Attached drain tubing to the hose with a male-male nipple and routed it to a drain pan. View attachment 383957 6. Remove the drain plug (10mm hex) and the level check straw (6mm hex) and drain fluid. I got about 2.5 quarts out (dirty and black). Surprisingly there is no magnet on the plug. 7. Re-install straw (15 in-lbs) and plug (just snug for now). 8. Added 4 quarts in fill hole with a hand pump. 9. Had wife start car and cycle 3 seconds in each gear while I watched 3 quarts of the nasty old fluid come out the tubing into an empty ATF jug (with visible level marks), then shut off engine. 10. Added 3 quarts, start car, drain 3. Repeat. I took out about 10.5 total and put in 11 before it started running out clean(er). Probably should have done another quart or two, just make sure to put in about 0.5 quart more than you take out so when you check the level, you get flow. I still had to put a little more in when checking level since I barely got flow and was worried. 11. Remove draining tube and reattach cooler hose. To set fluid level: 1. Ensure vehicle is level and cool. 2. Loosen drain plug (not straw) or fill port (Tundra). 3. Pin cooler T-stat bypass (Tundra - no ATF T-stat on Camry). 4. Go into ATF temperature detection mode: a. With ignition off, jumper OBD port terminals 13 to 4. (I'll attach a diagram if I can) I jumpered an OBD extension cable and then plugged it in to the port to make this easier than crawling under dash with a jumper wire. View attachment 383958 b. Start engine (CEL and others lights will blink) and slowly run through all gears and back to P. c. Put into N, then go between D and N once per second for >= 6 seconds. d. D (or maybe ATF Temp light) should stay lit for 2 seconds even though shifter is moving = success. e. Put in P. f. Remove jumper from OBD; this activates idle control. ATF temperature detection mode stays active until key is turned off. g. Observe the indicator ("D" or ATF Temp light): i. off = ATF too cold ii. On = ATF in range iii. Blinking = ATF to hot 5. Wait for light to come on; "D" for me. This took 5-10 minutes in 65F ambient, even after running the engine periodically to flush old fluid out. 6. As soon as light comes on, remove fill port (or plug, but not straw). If it starts blinking, let cool and start over. 7. Let drain until stream slows/changes or drips. Reinstall plug (36 ft-lbs) 8. If no fluid comes out while in temp range, you need to add fluid and repeat. Hope this helps. View attachment 383956 View attachment 383958
Are you in sunny San Diego by chance :=)
 
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