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Discussion Starter #1
So, I had the tires rotated, and they are almost done, 26,0000 miles...

Normal?
 

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2016 Camry XSE V6 ( Ruby )... 2018 Lexus ES 350 ( Pearl )
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Bought our 2016 XSE V6 new.
Rotated and balanced the factory Turdonza’s every 5-6k miles. Wheel alignment was good.
Burned em up at 20k with my granny wife driving at the wheel.
2nd set of Ohatzu’s ( or something like that)
Burned through them at 25k.
On the 3rd set. Federal Formosa’s.
10k on them now. So far, better than the last two sets but mileage will tell.

Nobody yet has been able to figure out why Ruby eats tires the way she does.

One tire guy said that low profile tires , (we have the factory 18” wheels on Ruby) wear faster because the sidewalls are stiffer.
One thing I have noticed is the rear set after a rotation has more measurable wear in 32nd’s than the fronts and this happens every rotation. Normally the fronts wear down faster due to front end weight, cornering and acceleration, which is leading me to the notion that the rear sway bars/ stabilizers are over/under-doing something.
But everything under the car is in great shape.
Dunno.

Edit: I’m a stickler on tire inflation, so I know it’s not that.
 

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2018 Toyota Camry SE 2.5
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The low profile tires they put on these sport sedans all have far too soft of a compound for any kind of long life. This is done for a reason. The manufacturer wants the car to handle as well as it possibly can when driven hard. It will do this better with soft compound tires, because they stick better. The same way a Formula 1 race car will lap 1 to 2 seconds faster with the softest compound tires, than it will with the hardest. As the saying suggests, you don't get something for nothing. The price paid for this is faster wear.

20,000 miles down the road, (or less), the tires are shot, because they simply wear out faster. But by then the manufacturer has accomplished their goal. Making you happy with the way the car has handled for the last 20K miles you've driven it. That and the fact low profile tires look cool. And who doesn't want a car that handles good, and looks cool doing it? You just end up pulling into Discount Tire faster because of both.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
26,000 so far. I will probably change them at 30k... 14-15 months of ownership, $700 for a set of tires...That works out to almost $50 a month for tires
 

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2016 VW Tiguan SE 4Motion (APR Stage 1, Neuspeed P-flow/wheels)
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The Toyota factory tires don't have good UTQG wear ratings to begin with.

No, it's not the low profile tires causing it.

You can get longer wearing tires for the car, like the Continental PureContact LS for it with a 70,000 mile pro-rated warranty on it.
 

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2018 Toyota Camry SE 2.5
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The Toyota factory tires don't have good UTQG wear ratings to begin with. No, it's not the low profile tires causing it You can get longer wearing tires for the car, like the Continental PureContact LS for it with a 70,000 mile pro-rated warranty on it.
Sure you can. But the compound with be hard as a rock. That's why they're guaranteed for 70K. There is no getting around ANY of this. High mileage tires = hard compound. Great handling tires = soft compound. It really is just that simple. The low profile tire equates to much better handling due to it's soft compound. The low profile of the tire ALSO adds to it's curb appeal, along with some added handling benefits. It's why Formula 1 is going to much lower profile tires next year. They're already soft as chewing gum.

Yeah, you can jack around with tire pressures and the like. But it won't amount to much. You can also add to this the fact that most people who buy high mileage, hard compound tires drive easy. They're not concerned about high performance handling. They want their tires to last as long as possible. While most who buy the high performance, soft compound, low profile tires, drive them harder, and are not all that concerned about how long they'll last. All which adds to the spread in mileage of both.
 

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BeerSteakTxas
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The Toyota factory tires don't have good UTQG wear ratings to begin with.

No, it's not the low profile tires causing it.

You can get longer wearing tires for the car, like the Continental PureContact LS for it with a 70,000 mile pro-rated warranty on it.
You may or may not get 70K depending on driving habits and roads in your area. You wont see 70K unless you drive like a granny on smooth asphalt roads. I had a 60K rated set of Michelin Primacy - in TX heat on concrete roads it lasted 25K miles. Also most manufacturers including Michelin and Continental use "variable compound" technology: the softer upper layer of rubber to make you go "WOW" my new tires are fri...g quiet and hold the road like nothing before, but as soon as your tires are worn down to the harder layer that should prolong tires life the traction and comfort goes south.
 

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BeerSteakTxas
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So far, the longest playing tires with good wet and cornering traction through out their life I've found are Pirelli's P7+ I'm not gonna get promised by Pirelli 70K out of them, but at around 50K they might get me another 5K before 2-3/32. And P7+ II suppose to be even better. Also to have enough wet traction you better replace your tires around 3-4/32.
 

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Discussion Starter #10

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2019 Camry XSE V6
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tirerack list for tire ratings for the 2019 xse v6 camry:
319802

  • ironically, the best rated tire is also a Bridgestone Turanza - but the QuietTrack version. the OEM factory ones are the Bridgestone Turanza EL440's, second to last on the list
  • QuietTrack's are about $40 each cheaper than factory, but those on a budget - number six on the list $165 General AltiMAX RT43 would be the best option
  • these ratings are for higher trimmed vehicles with 235/40-19 tire dimensions, so list also applies to similar class vehicles like the Honda Accord 2.0T Touring
319803


 

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2016 VW Tiguan SE 4Motion (APR Stage 1, Neuspeed P-flow/wheels)
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You may or may not get 70K depending on driving habits and roads in your area. You wont see 70K unless you drive like a granny on smooth asphalt roads. I had a 60K rated set of Michelin Primacy - in TX heat on concrete roads it lasted 25K miles. Also most manufacturers including Michelin and Continental use "variable compound" technology: the softer upper layer of rubber to make you go "WOW" my new tires are fri...g quiet and hold the road like nothing before, but as soon as your tires are worn down to the harder layer that should prolong tires life the traction and comfort goes south.
That's why it's Pro-rated. The sooner it wears out, the less money you kick out to buy a replacement tire.

The UTQG Government approved test track is in West Texas, so manufacturers test on hot texas weather. But, like anything on a car, YMMV, which is why they have the pro-rated warranty.

Sure you can. But the compound with be hard as a rock. That's why they're guaranteed for 70K. There is no getting around ANY of this. High mileage tires = hard compound. Great handling tires = soft compound. It really is just that simple. The low profile tire equates to much better handling due to it's soft compound. The low profile of the tire ALSO adds to it's curb appeal, along with some added handling benefits. It's why Formula 1 is going to much lower profile tires next year. They're already soft as chewing gum.

Yeah, you can jack around with tire pressures and the like. But it won't amount to much. You can also add to this the fact that most people who buy high mileage, hard compound tires drive easy. They're not concerned about high performance handling. They want their tires to last as long as possible. While most who buy the high performance, soft compound, low profile tires, drive them harder, and are not all that concerned about how long they'll last. All which adds to the spread in mileage of both.
Tires are a complex engineering product. It's more than just "hardness" of a compound that makes a tire handle better. You have tread design features as well as construction of the tire internals that contribute to handling of a tire.

Soft compound doesn't necessarily = great handling tires. In one extreme, winter tires have a soft compound, but due to the squirmy tread design, using it in the summer does not equal great handling, more like squirmy, less predictable handling.

The summer tires that came optional on the Prius and the FRS, The Michelin Primacy HP, yes, it's a soft summer tire, but its design makes it a rather poor handling tire, I'm willing to bet the All-season Pilot A/S 3 (with a harder compound) handles better than it, and no where near as good as a PSS or PS4S.

A Camry, no matter how much visual rice boy appeal Toyota adds, isn't a sports sedan, it's never going to handle like say a 5-series BMW. Even the new IS still can't compete with the germans when it comes to handling, despite Lexus marketing. Japanese mainstream approach to sportiness is .... "It has a large wheels... rides rough, so it must be sporty"
 

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Those of us who don't try to compete in F1 racing would prefer a "standard profile" tire (whatever that is nowadays) that rides, wears, and handles decently and doesn't cost an arm and a leg. I have an LE, so I'm sure my tires will be a little cheaper than some of the quotes above (but not by much, I'm afraid). Tires have gotten ridiculously expensive, and part of that is the car manufacturers pushing lower profile and higher performance tires. Most people don't need tires for a race car - and I'm not willing to pay for them. I passed on an SE due to its low profile tires. I might have pulled the trigger if it had been shod with the same tires as my LE.
 

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2019 Camry XSE V6
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Those of us who don't try to compete in F1 racing would prefer a "standard profile" tire (whatever that is nowadays) that rides, wears, and handles decently and doesn't cost an arm and a leg. I have an LE, so I'm sure my tires will be a little cheaper than some of the quotes above (but not by much, I'm afraid). Tires have gotten ridiculously expensive, and part of that is the car manufacturers pushing lower profile and higher performance tires. Most people don't need tires for a race car - and I'm not willing to pay for them. I passed on an SE due to its low profile tires. I might have pulled the trigger if it had been shod with the same tires as my LE.
the person asking about tire life specifically states he has a higher trimmed Camry with a V6 in the title, so apologies for offering recommendations for it and if you think we are all secretly F1 race car drivers

you could have created your own thread for your particular 4cyl LE trim, but here you go:
319823


319824
 

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Thanks for the info. (BTW, my comments were in no way directed at anyone other than the auto manufacturers)
 

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That's why it's Pro-rated. The sooner it wears out, the less money you kick out to buy a replacement tire.

The UTQG Government approved test track is in West Texas, so manufacturers test on hot texas weather. But, like anything on a car, YMMV, which is why they have the pro-rated warranty.



Tires are a complex engineering product. It's more than just "hardness" of a compound that makes a tire handle better. You have tread design features as well as construction of the tire internals that contribute to handling of a tire.

Soft compound doesn't necessarily = great handling tires. In one extreme, winter tires have a soft compound, but due to the squirmy tread design, using it in the summer does not equal great handling, more like squirmy, less predictable handling.

The summer tires that came optional on the Prius and the FRS, The Michelin Primacy HP, yes, it's a soft summer tire, but its design makes it a rather poor handling tire, I'm willing to bet the All-season Pilot A/S 3 (with a harder compound) handles better than it, and no where near as good as a PSS or PS4S.

A Camry, no matter how much visual rice boy appeal Toyota adds, isn't a sports sedan, it's never going to handle like say a 5-series BMW. Even the new IS still can't compete with the germans when it comes to handling, despite Lexus marketing. Japanese mainstream approach to sportiness is .... "It has a large wheels... rides rough, so it must be sporty"
Some Camry buyers are looking for reliability with less of the mushball handling most Japanese sedans feature. C/D got .94g with the TRD,. While not a great number, it a cheap car so you can’t expect the world.
 
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