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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Folks,

I've been wanting to buy this 8th generation Camry for a little a bit but I'm hesitant due to the transmission issues on the 2018/2019 models. I would very much appreciate your honest opinions on the 2020 models, preferably from current 2020 owners. Thank you very much in advance. Have a great day.
 

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2018 Camry XSE V6
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There is a TSB that came out for the 2018-2019 4cyl engines that's supposed to fix the issue. A couple of people here had it done and said it fixed the shifting problem if the dealer did it correctly. the tsb hasn't been updated to include 2020 though if the 2020's exhibit the same issue, the tsb will be updated.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It is quirky because of lockups in the lower gears but that is why the car gets such good mileage. It is a good tranny.
I went through most of Scotty's videos on youtube regarding the new Camry's. I'm not so sure what to think.
 

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The problem with Accords are they use turbos, which will wear out faster and they had a problems with oil dilution. Subaru used to have head gasket issues due to the opposed pistons from the boxer engine. I guess there is no perfect car and anything built by man can fail. For me, I have absolutely no regrets buying my 19 Camry LE.

On a road trip, I get well over 40 mpg. Excellent technology with the dual injectors per cylinder, so it reduces carbon.

This generation is also recommended by Consumer Reports, which tests also logs complaints.
 

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The problem with Accords are they use turbos, which will wear out faster and they had a problems with oil dilution. Subaru used to have head gasket issues due to the opposed pistons from the boxer engine. I guess there is no perfect car and anything built by man can fail. For me, I have absolutely no regrets buying my 19 Camry LE.

On a road trip, I get well over 40 mpg. Excellent technology with the dual injectors per cylinder, so it reduces carbon.

This generation is also be recommended by Consumer Reports, which tests also logs complaints.
What's your take on Mazdas? Mazda 6 or Mazda 3s? I really want to stick to Toyota or Honda but I'm open to Mazda/Subaru.
 

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2015 Camry SE
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Hello Folks,

I've been wanting to buy this 8th generation Camry for a little a bit but I'm hesitant due to the transmission issues on the 2018/2019 models. I would very much appreciate your honest opinions on the 2020 models, preferably from current 2020 owners. Thank you very much in advance. Have a great day.
I had a 2019 model as a rental for a month and it felt totally fine/normal to me. Either the 2019 didn't have the "problem" at all or it was overblown by people on this forum.

I specifically tried to make it act weird just to see what people were talking about. The only "jerkyness" or hesitation I could make it do was in one very specific situation: slowing down to a stop sign, and then instead of actually stopping, accelerating hard again right before you would stop (i.e. a "california stop"). In that exact situation there was a bit of a jerkyness from the car but it wasn't something that felt bad or much different from a lot of other newer transmissions I've used. And I would have never even noticed it because I always come to full legal stops at stop signs, like I said I was specifically trying to replicate the issue that I read about on here. I would never drive like that in regular driving, but maybe some people do and notice that jerk more often.

For the most part the transmission felt exactly like the one in my 2015 other than having more gears, and a little more hesitant to downshift (programming trying to keep it in better fuel economy range). If not for this forum I would have never noticed anything about it.

If I were you just test drive the car for a while and do a lot of those slow rolling stops. You can see if that jerk bothers you or if it is something you'd even ever experience in your driving style.

Also relevant to you, I had a 2018 Accord Sport for a few weeks as a rental as well. Here are my thoughs vs the Camry:

The Accord looks very good and drives very good. Seemed to handle a bit better than the Camry. Didn't ride as well as the Camry, felt the bumps more, the fact that pretty much every model other than the base has low profile tires probably doesn't help there. The adaptive cruise is more advanced than the Camry and it had a neat blind spot camera when you use turn signals. Car seems to sit lower and harder to get in and out of. The transmission was a CVT but didn't feel like a CVT, was more like a really smooth auto in most situations. 1.5T engine has its own set of issues you can read about.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I had a 2019 model as a rental for a month and it felt totally fine/normal to me. Either the 2019 didn't have the "problem" at all or it was overblown by people on this forum.

I specifically tried to make it act weird just to see what people were talking about. The only "jerkyness" or hesitation I could make it do was in one very specific situation: slowing down to a stop sign, and then instead of actually stopping, accelerating hard again right before you would stop (i.e. a "california stop"). In that exact situation there was a bit of a jerkyness from the car but it wasn't something that felt bad or much different from a lot of other newer transmissions I've used. And I would have never even noticed it because I always come to full legal stops at stop signs, like I said I was specifically trying to replicate the issue that I read about on here. I would never drive like that in regular driving, but maybe some people do and notice that jerk more often.

For the most part the transmission felt exactly like the one in my 2015 other than having more gears, and a little more hesitant to downshift (programming trying to keep it in better fuel economy range). If not for this forum I would have never noticed anything about it.

If I were you just test drive the car for a while and do a lot of those slow rolling stops. You can see if that jerk bothers you or if it is something you'd even ever experience in your driving style.

Also relevant to you, I had a 2018 Accord Sport for a few weeks as a rental as well. Here are my thoughs vs the Camry:

The Accord looks very good and drives very good. Seemed to handle a bit better than the Camry. Didn't ride as well as the Camry, felt the bumps more, the fact that pretty much every model other than the base has low profile tires probably doesn't help there. The adaptive cruise is more advanced than the Camry and it had a neat blind spot camera when you use turn signals. Car seems to sit lower and harder to get in and out of. The transmission was a CVT but didn't feel like a CVT, was more like a really smooth auto in most situations. 1.5T engine has its own set of issues you can read about.
Thank you for your input.
 

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I specifically tried to make it act weird just to see what people were talking about. The only "jerkyness" or hesitation I could make it do was in one very specific situation: slowing down to a stop sign, and then instead of actually stopping, accelerating hard again right before you would stop (i.e. a "california stop"). In that exact situation there was a bit of a jerkyness from the car but it wasn't something that felt bad or much different from a lot of other newer transmissions I've used. And I would have never even noticed it because I always come to full legal stops at stop signs, like I said I was specifically trying to replicate the issue that I read about on here. I would never drive like that in regular driving, but maybe some people do and notice that jerk more often.
This is the exact issue that people usually complain about, except even with modest acceleration from a stop, the transmission takes a couple seconds to downshift.
If you have this issue, that also means that at cruising speed, your car isn't downshifting properly. I had mine reprogrammed via TSB-0152-19 at 10K miles and it was a night-and-day-difference.

If you've never driven a modern automatic you might think the transmission is fine, but even magazine reviewers have complained about the transmission, so it's certainly not just being overblown by people here.
 

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2015 Camry SE
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This is the exact issue that people usually complain about, except even with modest acceleration from a stop, the transmission takes a couple seconds to downshift.

Even magazine reviewers have complained about the transmission, so no, it's not just being overblown by people here.
Well like I said I had to specifically go out of my way to replicate it and even then only it only happened if I accelerated hard from a "almost stop". If you stop legally at stop signs or accelerate modestly from a almost stop it doesn't happen. In regular stop and go city driving I never felt it. And even when it did happen during my testing it didn't feel like it was broken, just a quirk of the transmission that you see in a lot of non-CVT automatics now. My wife's former Mazda CX-3 acted similarly on a more noticeable basis right from brand new.

If the thing I felt in the 2019 is the same thing people here are always complaining about it is totally overblown. Either that or the 2019 had some sort of update to make it less pronounced. I was expecting it to feel like a Ford Focus powershift based on the postings here but in my experience it was butter smooth for 99.99% of my driving.

Edit: For reference I put about 1500mi on the car while I had it and it had around 15,000mi on the odo.
 

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Well like I said I had to specifically go out of my way to replicate it and even then only it only happened if I accelerated hard from a "almost stop". If you stop legally at stop signs or accelerate modestly from a almost stop it doesn't happen. In regular stop and go city driving I never felt it. And even when it did happen during my testing it didn't feel like it was broken, just a quirk of the transmission that you see in a lot of non-CVT automatics now. My wife's former Mazda CX-3 acted similarly on a more noticeable basis right from brand new.

If the thing I felt in the 2019 is the same thing people here are always complaining about it is totally overblown. Either that or the 2019 had some sort of update to make it less pronounced. I was expecting it to feel like a Ford Focus powershift based on the postings here but in my experience it was butter smooth for 99.99% of my driving.

Edit: For reference I put about 1500mi on the car while I had it and it had around 15,000mi on the odo.
Your limited experiences with a used car do not invalidate the thousands of complaints from other people, and if it was overblown then there would not be multiple TSBs for it. The transmission update was probably already done before you drove the car.
 

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Your limited experiences with a used car do not invalidate the thousands of complaints from other people, and if it was overblown then there would not be multiple TSBs for it. The transmission update was probably already done before you drove the car.
I haven't seen "thousands of complaints". Toyota sells like 300,000 of these cars a year and it sounds like the vast majority of owners aren't noticing or complaining about this. Even on here its maybe a few dozen.

And like I said I have no idea if there was an update to the car I had or not. All I can tell you is the one I had drove perfectly fine to me after driving it in extensive conditions. Early 2019 build car from what I remember. If what I was feeling in that car is the "problem" it is not a problem at all.

Getting back on topic: My advice to OP is to do like I said and drive a car like I did. I was hesitant about choosing a Camry when I upgrade due to comments on this forum but after actually driving one extensively I'd have no issue whatsoever buying a 2019+ Camry. With my driving style it was nearly a perfect. When it comes to drivability and "feel" you will never know by reading forum posts and just need to go on an extensive test drive, or... rent one for a week to get the feel of a car thats already been broken in without a sales guy breathing down your neck. $100-200 to rent one is nothing compared to making a $30,000 mistake if it turns out you don't like something about the feel of the car.

Worst case scenario: actually stop at stop signs instead of rolling them.
 

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Your limited experiences with a used car do not invalidate the thousands of complaints from other people, and if it was overblown then there would not be multiple TSBs for it. The transmission update was probably already done before you drove the car.
But then again, I have the 2018 LE 35K miles so far. Factory transmission. Never been reprogrammed. No TSB. No recall. Transmission works just fine. I can't find any problem with it.
 

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TEST DRIVE! Either people like it or they hate it. That is all that it comes down to. That is the nature of the beast.
^
This.
Test drive and feel the car. It`s almost impossible to find an honest and upfront car salesman so they won`t tell you while you test drive it. Tell them you want to take your time and really want to feel the car so they can extend it. Yes, my 19 has terrible lag/hesitant tranny which i hate everyday but i learned to live with it.
 

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Considering Accord, Corolla. Maybe even that stinking Subaru, Crosstrek. I've never owned a Subaru and I'm a bit hesitant as they are not as reliable as Hondas or Toyotas.
The Accord looks very good and drives very good. Seemed to handle a bit better than the Camry. Didn't ride as well as the Camry, felt the bumps more, the fact that pretty much every model other than the base has low profile tires probably doesn't help there. The adaptive cruise is more advanced than the Camry and it had a neat blind spot camera when you use turn signals. Car seems to sit lower and harder to get in and out of. The transmission was a CVT but didn't feel like a CVT, was more like a really smooth auto in most situations. 1.5T engine has its own set of issues you can read about.
I bought a new Accord Sport 2.0t about a month and a half ago. I cross-shopped the Camry and found that the interior of the Accord was significantly better than the Camry. The Honda Sensing was also significantly better than the Toyota system too. I agree that the ride with the 19" rims that come standard on the Sport and Touring trims make the ride a bit harsh- but it is something that I've gotten used to. The LX, EX, and EXL models all use 17" rims that not only ride a bit better, but they get better fuel economy too. I also noticed that none of my local Toyota dealers had a decent supply of Camrys on the lot. The one that I've used in the past usually has about 100 on the lot to choose from. They had about 25... mostly LEs and SEs and a handful of fully-loaded XLE/XSE V6 models that stickered for almost 40 grand. I was hoping to score a deal on a XLE or XSE V6 without all of the option packages, but no one in my area had one. That said, my Honda dealer had a good selection of 2.0t Sport and EXL models in stock.

I drove the 1.5t Accord for a little bit and while it was completely adequate, it didn't have enough spunk for my liking. Given the issues that Honda had with the 1.5t in colder climates, I quickly decided to avoid that engine. Honda says that they have resolved that oil issue, but I'm not convinced. I haven't heard anyone complain about the issue with the 2.0t motor. Once I drove the 2.0t model, it sealed the deal for me. The 10-speed automatic that's included with the 2.0t motor is extremely smooth. Plus, many trim levels of the Accord have Sport and Eco modes- and you can tell a difference between those two modes and the normal mode. When you engage Sport mode, the steering gets noticeably more firm and the shifting gets a lot more aggressive. It constantly brings a smile to my face.

After driving it for about a month and a half, the only thing that I don't like about it is the fact that Honda made the Accord's center console/shifter area very wide- and my knee hits the side of it. I only notice it on really long drives- and I just have to readjust my leg.

I'd seriously consider the 2.0t Accord if your budget allows. It's a really nice car. Right now you can get a 2020 2.0t Sport or an EXL 2.0t for around $29,500. If you wait until the 2021 models come out, that will likely go down by a bit. I paid $27,000 for mine- but it was a leftover 2019 model.
 
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