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Discussion Starter #141 (Edited)
I don't have a video as it's hard to do while driving but here is a picture. :smile: This is very similar to a video on level steady cruising as they don't move much in that case.
Gauges look great. I'm looking at the same boost gauge as you, that goes to 15 psi. I'd really love to see your A/FR under boost. Did you ever get a chance to look at your fuel trims via scangauge? If/when you do, could you snap a pic of your STFT and LTFT at idle and, say, around 3K rpm? I think I have an identical setup to you with regard to PCV and breather, but my trims are really out of whack. I'll continue to check my hose connections. I hope that the lean condition and compensation fuel is due to the different charge piping and the MAF not yet being clamped by the FIC, but this is pure supposition on my part.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #142
More F/IC Installation Pics

I use a 1 1/4" bi-metal hole saw to cut through the firewall. Why so big, you ask? The F/IC harness is thick and I also have to pass a split loom through for gauge wires as well as the small vacuum line for the F/IC MAP sensor. There should be just enough room. Once it's all in there, I'll glob in some RTV to seal it up. It's not really in an area that gets any water, so this would probably not be nessary, but will do it for good measure.

Hole saw. After I cut through, I painted the bare metal and let it dry.



Reflecting on simplistic algebra I learned in school, I used C= pi x D to figure out how long a piece of rubber vacuum line I needed. I sliced the vacuum line and worked it into place as a 'grommet'. A little RTV on it before installation should keep it in place, but it's mighty secure without the RTV.





This is not the final placement of the F/IC. I will likely secure it to the upper kick panel area behind the glovebox and run the USB laptop interface into the glove box.



Lovely spaghetti to sort out...
 

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Yes, a Plug n' Play harness would be great, except that there isn't one available for my application. The wiring doesn't intimidate me as I've done a fair bit of that before. Glad you're having great luck with your setup.
I know that you didn't have that option but since I did it was worth it. You also had a good understanding of your wiring harness due to the engine swap. I on the other hand didn't. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #144
I know that you didn't have that option but since I did it was worth it. You also had a good understanding of your wiring harness due to the engine swap. I on the other hand didn't. :lol:
Haha, I can tell you that at this stage of the project, I'd probably jump on one now if it was available, LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter #145 (Edited)
I haven't done an update in a while, so here are a few things I've been doing.

I had an issue with what appeared to be oil not draining fast enough from my turbo CHRA and causing smoking, so redesigned my drain. Instead of going behind and under tha axle, I moved to over and in front of the axle. Should be lots of clearance, but I'll test after I lower the car back to its wheels. I upgraded to larger fittings and moved to a 5/8" ID drain hose. Smoking issue appears to be resolved. Although not shown in the pic, the braided hose is now installed. I did test it with a clear hose and flow is great.



I installed a oil pan temp sensor.







Here are my gauges. I cheaped out, although these gauges get good reviews. I couldn't refuse as I found the temp gauges for $13.00USD each, down from ~ $50.00 each. My plan is to upgrade the gauges over time with better quality ones. I picked up an A-pillar gauge pod specifically designed for the '06 - '08 hatchback. It looks identical in shape and form to the stock, except that it will require a bit of adapting to attach as it doesn't have pins. The pic shows a comparison between a sedan, a hatchback and pics of the A-pillars in my 08 and 06 HBs. I made this pic as a guy on yarisworld ordered it for his sedan and it did not fit. We figured out that the listing is wrong and that it doesn't work for the sedan, but does for the HB








My fuel trims have improved since I installed the 440cc injectors. I'm running a bit more rich after a few runs, but that's to be expected with the larger injectors and the FIC not hooked up and using its fuel mapping.








I rigged up a transmission temp sensor housing with bits and pieces I had lying around. One of the "oil temp" gauges I bought will be for trans temp.



I have my appointment to get the exhaust done on 08 July and my dyno tune on 15 July.
 

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Discussion Starter #146 (Edited)
Evap Hose and Oil Catch Can

I installed my catch can and because I didn't have any hose, I picked up some rubber fuel hose from the local parts store. It seemed quite firm, but completely failed under vacuum. It basically sucked flat. So, I went to a local hydraulics shop and picked up some Pulsar 4000 psi hose. Not cheap at ~ $5.95/ft, so thankfully I only needed about 2.5 ft. They had some cheaper stuff at $2.49/ft but it was heavily steel reinforced rubber and I was worried that I wouldn't get a good seal with a clamp as it was so rigid, plus it seemed less flexible than the Pulsar stuff. The Pulsar hose appears to be constructed with a very thick teflon liner. I tested it with my 3/8" barb fittings and it seals well. It may not even require a clamp, but I'll put one on for good measure.

I had no idea that the vacuum produced by a car could completely flatten a rubber hose. These is no way that this Pulsar hose will even be slightly deformed by the vacuum. It's designed to handle 4000 psi (outward pressure of course), but I could barely deform it squeezing as hard as I could. I'll report back on how it holds up.





 

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Discussion Starter #148
this is amazing, thanks for all the detailed research! :D I'm glad to see everything is coming along well, you already have your dates set for your exhaust and tune, whats left after that? rip it down the street a bit in a few videos?
Thanks! I'm sure I'll do a few vids but probably not immediately. I'll be going easy on the car and slowly pushing it bit by bit. Once I'm comfortable with what the car can handle, I'll do a couple of vids accelerating, gauges etc.

I've had another minor setback. See next post...
 

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Discussion Starter #149 (Edited)
Turbo Drain...Take 3...

When I designed my new turbo drain, I thought I'd accounted for enough room of axle movement vertically and horizontally. I had taken into account the fact that the car's suspension was fully extended as the car was on jackstands. After lowering the car onto blocking today, I had about the clearance that I was expecting but I'm not fully confident that in an extreme braking situation combined with a bump that the axle would clear the fittings. This would be particularly devastating as the galvanized fittings would smash forward and probably take a chunk of the block (where the oil pan inlet is) with it.

So, I removed a couple of the fittings and went straight vertical with the hose and joined the 45 under the turbo. There is a good curve but smooth and the hose has fully retained it 'roundness'.

***Nerd Alert***: I took some measurements:

3.5" upward vertical deflection for outboard of axle to contact frame. The is a little indentation in the frame, presumeably in the event of the worst possible nose-down scenario combined with running over a log or something for the maximum possible deflection.

22" from inboard CV joint to area where axle would contact the frame - a highly unlikely event. The axle is close to 28" hub to hub (excluding the splined sections), so the wheel would basically have to be well into the engine bay, I'd think, by the time the axle bottomed out on the frame.

6" from inner CV hub to where drain line crosses over axle.

1.75" vertical distance between drain line and axle.

Using a slope calculator, I should have more than adequate clearance. Also, as the wheel hub deflects up and down from center, the pivot point of the axle would move outboard, allowing me even more space between the axle and drain line. I will wrap a bit of tape around the drain hose just above the axle and check it for evidence of contact. Even if it did make contact, it's now going to hit a flexible line as opposed to steel fittings.

I have about 1" clearance horizontally between the pan fittings and axle. When I had the rear lower mount (dog bone) out, I could rock the engine and forward until it hit the radiator and rearward until it hit the subframe. Even with these extreme movements, the axle would not contact my drain line. The engine will likely tilt forward at the top due to the mount geometry. I did stiffen my dogbone mount, so I expect movement near the inner axles will happen but it should be pretty minimal. That said, I might turn the galvanized elbow in another turn just to be super safe.






 

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Discussion Starter #150
Trans Temp Sensor Housing Installed

A quick job it was and it's extremely secure.

 

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that turbo drain post was amazing. you really explained it well and worked around a potentially dangerous situation using maths to resolve it properly. :) This build is going to be bullet-proof reliable from the looks of the care you've put into it all.

Nice Trans temp sensor install! It's crazy how you installed the trans cooler, and the temp sensor.. on a Yaris with a corolla engine lol, tuners may feel thats overkill lol! Why not use a scangauge2 to read the Trans temp from the ECU's PID? we recently had a post where another was able to get the proper Trans temp PID read from the ECU's live memory on our 2ZR-FE! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #152
Dang, I wrote a long response and then inadvertently closed the tab. :frown:

Thanks! I wouldn't say that my car will be anywhere near bulletproof. I won't be able to thrash on it if I want it to last. I'm adding significant HP and torque to inherently weaker components (trans, engine itself, mounts, fuel system, radiator etc). This is why I'm trying to ensure the best possible outcome. If I had gobs and gobs of cash floating around, I'd build the engine, trans, upgrade the fuel system, cooling system etc, but still probably only shoot for 12 - 15 psi of boost. The car is in great shape for its vintage and there are almost no RS 5 -doors available anymore. Who knows, maybe down the road I'll do these aforementioned 'upgrades'.

I'm really interested in reading that thread about the PIDs. If you know where it is, right off, could you link me to it? I tried custom pids with no luck. They worked on Tacomas and some other Toyota vehicles, but I couldn't get them to recognize anything related to trans or oil temps. At least, I have boost/vacuum, coolant temp, A/FR, fuel trims, timing etc through Torque. For now, the gauges will have to do the rest.
 

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Dang, I wrote a long response and then inadvertently closed the tab. :frown:

Thanks! I wouldn't say that my car will be anywhere near bulletproof. I won't be able to thrash on it if I want it to last. I'm adding significant HP and torque to inherently weaker components (trans, engine itself, mounts, fuel system, radiator etc). This is why I'm trying to ensure the best possible outcome. If I had gobs and gobs of cash floating around, I'd build the engine, trans, upgrade the fuel system, cooling system etc, but still probably only shoot for 12 - 15 psi of boost. The car is in great shape for its vintage and there are almost no RS 5 -doors available anymore. Who knows, maybe down the road I'll do these aforementioned 'upgrades'.

I'm really interested in reading that thread about the PIDs. If you know where it is, right off, could you link me to it? I tried custom pids with no luck. They worked on Tacomas and some other Toyota vehicles, but I couldn't get them to recognize anything related to trans or oil temps. At least, I have boost/vacuum, coolant temp, A/FR, fuel trims, timing etc through Torque. For now, the gauges will have to do the rest.
you definitely seem like a reasonable and thoughtful enthusiast that's for sure, it will serve you and your car well! :)

HEre's the link to the post about PIDs for trans temp, it was in the general 10th gen Corolla chat thread, i asked about it a few weeks ago and someone came to the rescue! :D https://www.toyotanation.com/forum/149-corolla-10th-gen-2nd-gen-matrix-2009-2013/361534-official-10th-gen-corolla-matrix-chat-thread-707.html#post14053232
 

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Discussion Starter #154
you definitely seem like a reasonable and thoughtful enthusiast that's for sure, it will serve you and your car well! :)

HEre's the link to the post about PIDs for trans temp, it was in the general 10th gen Corolla chat thread, i asked about it a few weeks ago and someone came to the rescue! :D https://www.toyotanation.com/forum/149-corolla-10th-gen-2nd-gen-matrix-2009-2013/361534-official-10th-gen-corolla-matrix-chat-thread-707.html#post14053232
Thanks! Not being familiar at all with scangauge, I wonder how these pids are entered. It's definitely different that Torque.

Off to find some youtube vids! :grin:
 

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Turbo Drain...Take 3...

When I designed my new turbo drain, I thought I'd accounted for enough room of axle movement vertically and horizontally. I had taken into account the fact that the car's suspension was fully extended as the car was on jackstands. After lowering the car onto blocking today, I had about the clearance that I was expecting but I'm not fully confident that in an extreme braking situation combined with a bump that the axle would clear the fittings. This would be particularly devastating as the galvanized fittings would smash forward and probably take a chunk of the block (where the oil pan inlet is) with it.

So, I removed a couple of the fittings and went straight vertical with the hose and joined the 45 under the turbo. There is a good curve but smooth and the hose has fully retained it 'roundness'.

***Nerd Alert***: I took some measurements:

3.5" upward vertical deflection for outboard of axle to contact frame. The is a little indentation in the frame, presumeably in the event of the worst possible nose-down scenario combined with running over a log or something for the maximum possible deflection.

22" from inboard CV joint to area where axle would contact the frame - a highly unlikely event. The axle is close to 28" hub to hub (excluding the splined sections), so the wheel would basically have to be well into the engine bay, I'd think, by the time the axle bottomed out on the frame.

6" from inner CV hub to where drain line crosses over axle.

1.75" vertical distance between drain line and axle.

Using a slope calculator, I should have more than adequate clearance. Also, as the wheel hub deflects up and down from center, the pivot point of the axle would move outboard, allowing me even more space between the axle and drain line. I will wrap a bit of tape around the drain hose just above the axle and check it for evidence of contact. Even if it did make contact, it's now going to hit a flexible line as opposed to steel fittings.

I have about 1" clearance horizontally between the pan fittings and axle. When I had the rear lower mount (dog bone) out, I could rock the engine and forward until it hit the radiator and rearward until it hit the subframe. Even with these extreme movements, the axle would not contact my drain line. The engine will likely tilt forward at the top due to the mount geometry. I did stiffen my dogbone mount, so I expect movement near the inner axles will happen but it should be pretty minimal. That said, I might turn the galvanized elbow in another turn just to be super safe.
Why are you using a galvanized fitting? I have my oil drain line going straight to the fitting in the block from the turbo. I always have thought of galvanized fittings to be brittle.
 

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Thanks! I wouldn't say that my car will be anywhere near bulletproof. I won't be able to thrash on it if I want it to last. I'm adding significant HP and torque to inherently weaker components (trans, engine itself, mounts, fuel system, radiator etc). This is why I'm trying to ensure the best possible outcome. If I had gobs and gobs of cash floating around, I'd build the engine, trans, upgrade the fuel system, cooling system etc, but still probably only shoot for 12 - 15 psi of boost. The car is in great shape for its vintage and there are almost no RS 5 -doors available anymore. Who knows, maybe down the road I'll do these aforementioned 'upgrades'.
I think that you will be surprised. When I was at Toyotafest I spoke to a lot of people that told me Toyota builds a lot of headroom into parts and that even without doing any internal engine upgrades the 2ZR-FE can handle close to the 300HP range with stock internals. With me keeping mine at 230HP for now they all felt that I would be in good shape and be similar in reliability to stock as long as I didn't do anything stupid. If you enjoy the extra power when needed and don't drag race it from every red light I'm sure things will hold up well for you. Now if you want to turn up the boost and over build some things than more power to you! :lol:

When I spoke to Jesse at Turbokits he said the same thing. Many of the people that I spoke to at Toyotafest had a lot of experience in building up Toyotas and several have even worked for Toyota for decades. The most amazing thing on my trip was as much fun as I was having enjoying the power in the mountains and I still got 35-40 mpg. Talk about having your cake and eating it too! :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter #157 (Edited)
Why are you using a galvanized fitting? I have my oil drain line going straight to the fitting in the block from the turbo. I always have thought of galvanized fittings to be brittle.

I used galvanized because they were readily available. I have used galvanized on many cars in the past for trans coolers/sensor housings, and a remote oil filter housing. I've never had any issues. I bought a bunch of fittings to be sure I had pieces that I needed but wouldn't know for sure until I started. I didn't want to wait for brass fittings ordered online. I read about one concern: the galvanized coating flaking off and getting into the system, but I've never seen any evidence of that after disassembling the fittings.
 

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Discussion Starter #158 (Edited)
I think that you will be surprised. When I was at Toyotafest I spoke to a lot of people that told me Toyota builds a lot of headroom into parts and that even without doing any internal engine upgrades the 2ZR-FE can handle close to the 300HP range with stock internals. With me keeping mine at 230HP for now they all felt that I would be in good shape and be similar in reliability to stock as long as I didn't do anything stupid. If you enjoy the extra power when needed and don't drag race it from every red light I'm sure things will hold up well for you. Now if you want to turn up the boost and over build some things than more power to you! :lol:

When I spoke to Jesse at Turbokits he said the same thing. Many of the people that I spoke to at Toyotafest had a lot of experience in building up Toyotas and several have even worked for Toyota for decades. The most amazing thing on my trip was as much fun as I was having enjoying the power in the mountains and I still got 35-40 mpg. Talk about haeving your cake and eating it too! :grin:

Great to hear. I guess the 2ZR itself would be lowest on my list of concerns. Ranking number one would be the clutch packs in the U340E, followed by the cooling system's ability to handle the extra heat. I've been told by a number of experienced people that there should be enough reserve capacity in the cooling system to handle it. It's not like I'll be tracking it.

With regard to the trans, when I spoke to the guys at Monkeywrench Racing - before deciding yo go with Turbokits - I was told that the U341E (which handles marginally more torque than the U340E) was good up to about 275 HP. I think with a reasonable driving style, I should be ok. I expect that I'll be using it in a very similar manner to the way you use yours.
 

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just remember guys, the 2ZR-FE can handle quite a bit of HP as it was used in the "SERIES 3" Lotus Elise SC (Supercharged with a Magnuson R900 supercharger) models seen here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lotus_Elise

Note the 2011 to present Lotus Elise's 2ZR-FE power output:
the 2011 Lotus Elise Cup 220 made 217 bhp (162 kW; 220 PS) at 6800 rpm & 250 N⋅m (184 lb⋅ft) at 4600 rpm
the 2015 Lotus Elise Cup 250 made 243 bhp (181 kW; 246 PS) at 7200 rpm & 250 N⋅m (184 lb⋅ft) at 5500 rpm
the 2017 Lotus Elise Cup 260 made 250 bhp (186 kW; 253 PS) at 7200 rpm & 265 N⋅m (195 lb⋅ft) at 5500 rpm

250 bhp on a RWD manual is about 210 whp

With that in mind, reaching those numbers with a turbocharger SHOULD be safe and not affect reliability for our 2ZR-FE engine internals, if we don't beat on the car. Heck we may even be able to up the redline of out 2ZR-FE with an ECU tune from Orange Virus tuning, up to 7000 rpm, and probably STILL be within safety margins, considering Lotus as a manufacturer offers our engine with a 7200 rpm redline... of course we don't know if the Lotus's have upgraded valve-springs, retainers, & seals to handle the extra RPM, or forged pistons/connecting rods to handle the extra power.. but maybe a call to a Lotus dealer or tracking down a Lotus Engineer on social media and asking, or asking on the Lotus forums, might reveal the truth as to whether their 2ZR-FE block is internally the same as ours or if it's internally modified and strengthened... (edit) or we could just email Monkey Wrench Racing, they'll know, lol.

Now what about power limits BEYOND what the Lotus manufacturing and engineering teams have achieved?

2ZR-FE Power limits have been talked about on other forums: http://www.corollaforum.com/threads/2zr-fe.5711/
Where they've mentioned a previous 10th gen corolla that had been modified with the turbokits.com kit (and an 11th gen a custom turbokit) to take the 2ZR-FE to 240whp and the 11th gen 2ZR-FAE to 260whp (which is about 300 crank hp).
 

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Discussion Starter #160
Wire acquired for gauges

I couldn't resist the sale at Princess Auto. Each roll was $3.99 CAD. Now I don't have to worry about sorting out a potential wiring problem - or putting stickers in each wire for identification purposes - as the wires are the same colors as the Prosport gauge wiring. Well, except instead of orange for the Prosport, I'll be using yellow. They had no orange wire. I'll need a bit of wire loom and will probably have to drill another hole through the firewall as I'll be feeding wires for three gauges.

Gauges have arrived at my US mailbox as well as my factory fit 3 gauge pod A-pillar. I hope I have decent luck with these cheap gauges, but I'll be upgrading them with better ones if/when I have issues.

 
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