Toyota Nation Forum banner

41 - 60 of 78 Posts

·
Premium Member
1994 Corolla DX
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #41
I guess? Although I'd think they'd be closer to the lower end than the upper end of the range as-new. I have no expertise here though so just speculating.

And yeah we've been pretty religious about regular oil changes since it was new... seems to have paid off in terms of very minimal wear!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,643 Posts
12 point isn't GUARANTEED to round bolt heads or anything. It does make it more likely, depending on design and quality of the sockets.
If you get a 12 point socket within 4 and half feet of any fastener it immediately seizes and then rounds itself into a perfect circle, the filings march in a line right into your oil fill cap.
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
5,421 Posts
And I will say, even @DannoXYZ pointed out years ago that the stupid oil pan is a pain to remove:



It would seem like such a straightforward thing to do. And indeed, the lower pan is. The upper though, grrr....
Dammit, @DannoXYZ, getcha a burner computer and come back!!!!
 

·
Premium Member
1994 Corolla DX
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #44
Ok, replaced all the bearings!

They all looked pretty darned good for 160k! All were within the upper range of spec. Interestingly the new bearings didn't really shift the needle much in terms of bringing the readings closer to the lower range. They were a bit tighter, but only a bit. All the existing bearings were marked with #2, which I believe means they are part number 13041-16090-02 (1993-1997 Toyota Bearings 13041-16090-02 | Frank Toyota Parts) as opposed to -01 or -03.

Cylinder #1
302023


302024


And here's the reading on the new bearing - as you can see it's only a tad better:
302025



Cylinder #2 - in between the .038 and the .051 reading:
302026


302027


Cylinder #3 - the best one:
302028


And got it all buttoned up - here's a shot before I put the bottom pan on. So clean!!
302029


Here are all the bearings laid out. Cylinder 4 upper bearing looks the worst, but none of them look bad:
302022


I'm letting it all cure overnight, and then I'll continue with oil/filter tomorrow, and try to button up the exhaust and the frame brace. And if I get far enough - try to start the engine!
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
5,421 Posts
And the pessimist in me says to hold on to those original bearings just in case the new ones are somehow defective, It's not the 1970s anymore...
 

·
Premium Member
1994 Corolla DX
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #47
They are genuine Japanese made OE bearings. I am less concerned about that and more concerned if I somehow messed something up :) I don’t think I did though. We shall see.
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
5,421 Posts
They are genuine Japanese made OE bearings. I am less concerned about that and more concerned if I somehow messed something up :) I don’t think I did though. We shall see.
Make sure the new bearings are all clicked into place and then double and triple check all of your fasteners for torque. I wish I could come up with a more comprehensive checklist...

I've been in the bottom end of an engine before - just not one that was ever getting put back together...
 

·
Premium Member
1994 Corolla DX
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #51
Make sure the new bearings are all clicked into place and then double and triple check all of your fasteners for torque. I wish I could come up with a more comprehensive checklist...

I've been in the bottom end of an engine before - just not one that was ever getting put back together...
Too late for any advice now - it’s all buttoned up, so if you catch any mistakes I may have made it’s going to take a full disassembly! :)

Torque is two steps. 22 ft/lbs and then another 90 degrees. I must admit I didn’t use the dial I got for the 90 degrees (it was for 1/2” sockets and my 12 point 12 mm is 3/8”). Instead I tried to eyeball as best as I could the wrench directly parallel with the engine to directly cross engine.

Did you put grease or oil on them when you installed them?
I used Permatex assembly lube
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
5,421 Posts
Torque is two steps. 22 ft/lbs and then another 90 degrees. I must admit I didn’t use the dial I got for the 90 degrees (it was for 1/2” sockets and my 12 point 12 mm is 3/8”). Instead I tried to eyeball as best as I could the wrench directly parallel with the engine to directly cross engine.
Those sound like torque-to-yield bolts. Did you use new bolts?
 

·
Premium Member
1994 Corolla DX
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #54
Those sound like torque-to-yield bolts. Did you use new bolts?
I did not. I don’t believe they are TTY. The torque angle method is to compensate for the variability of torque introduced by lubricating the bolts. So torque to a light value not much affected by lubricants, then apply a fixed torque from that point onwards.

The FSM does not state anything about whether to reuse bolts or not and it’s usually pretty adamant about non-reusable parts.
 

·
Premium Member
1994 Corolla DX
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #55
Slowly, slowly making progress in the rest of the assembly.

Did put filter on (@Pete Suhman - remind me again what I have to do with the o-ring? LOL), and added almost 4.5 quarts of oil before hitting the full mark, so quite a bit came out from dropping the pan given normal drain/fill is what - 3.9 quarts?

Also put the frame brace back in place between the crossmember and front frame - took some wiggling but with the rear trans mount loose you can slide the brace back under. I haven't lined up the through-bolt on the rear trans mount yet, it will take some exercise in patience to get it lined up right.

Also taking the opportunity to clean up all the gunk so it will be easier to monitor any leaks.
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
5,421 Posts
I was watching Watch Wes Work on the youtube last night and he was changing the pistons in his wife's RAV4, and the rod bolts on that engine were 12mm 12 points.

He said that there were no TTY bolts on that engine - at least where he was working.

 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
4,140 Posts
Why didn't you change the connecting rod bearings too when you changed the crankshaft bearings? I've never done either. Just wondering if it's possible or just as easy.
 

·
Premium Member
1994 Corolla DX
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
Discussion Starter #58
Ok I finished everything and fired the engine up! Started right away (it's been sitting for what - 6 weeks now?)! Ran smoothly. Sigh of relief! I'll probably have to play with belt tension a bit as the accessory belts had a bit of a squeal.

I think I'll pop in the front brake calipers I rebuilt a year ago as well while the car is up on jack stands. And then I think I'll put it back into service, as my next project is timing belt for the Outback. Gotta have one working car at all times!

Why didn't you change the connecting rod bearings too when you changed the crankshaft bearings? I've never done either. Just wondering if it's possible or just as easy.
I think you have it backwards. I changed the connecting rod bearings (crankshaft-to-connecting-rod). I did not change the main bearings (crankshaft-to-engine-block) as my understanding from DannoXYZ is that those rarely wear out. I'm not sure if I would be able to do them even with the engine still installed. I'd think the crankshaft would have to come out for those to be replaced.
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
4,140 Posts
Oh yes, I was confused. I thought you could rotate and slide the upper half of the crank bearings out, and I thought that's what you were doing. So, if you just did the rod bearings then my question would have been why you didn't do the crankshaft bearings, but you answered that.
 
41 - 60 of 78 Posts
Top