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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

This is my first post. I looked around here as best I could first for some info on this, but just couldn’t seem to find anything

I have a 97 T100 2WD, and am refreshing the front hubs with new bearings, greasing, etc, and I can’t find anywhere about how to remove the INNER grease seal (called an oil seal in parts catalog).

I did read that it is NOT supposed to be reused, presumably b/c it must get compromised when removing the inner bearing (which I can’t seem to remove w/o removing the grease seal first).

the seal seems to be rubberized on the surface, bu

I have included a picture, with the flat blade screwdriver tip pointingthe subject seal.

Thanks to anyone that may be able to help!!

Mason
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
sdspeed, thank you! The slide hammer definitely looks like the ticket here. I’ve seen them but never used one. I’d had in my head a diy idea to get a wood dowel just a little smaller diameter than the hub opening diameter, and try whacking on it from the outer side. Good to know too that it’s just a pressure fit seal. I’ll post results of my efforts!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Since i now know that it’s just a pressure fit seal in a pretty much zero psi environment, I figured it couldn’t be too hard to remove. So... I decided to just try a long handled flat blade screwdriver to pry the seal out (again, knowing I wasn’t going to reuse it). The inner lip of the seal that comes in contact w/the bearing is flexible, and I could push the blade right under it. Just a little bit of pressure and it popped right out!

I had plenty of room to do this, with the hub being off the truck and on my bench. I could see how the slide hammer would be needed for the application in the video!
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi relee, yes, and thanks for that idea. I actually practiced several times inserting, removing and reinserting the old seal with that exact idea of using a larger flat piece of wood (a scrap 1x6 pine plank about a foot long). Works great. So when my new seals arrive, I've got a good feel for it. I found that it needs to be seated just a little further in than the flat piece of wood will allow, but that gets it in nice and straight 95% of the way. I then cut a smaller circle of wood, just a little bit smaller than the seal diameter, to push it down the last 5%. The video that spspeed links above shows a guy using a short piece of pvc pipe for the seal installation - another good idea. I found though that using the circle of wood alone (or the pvc pipe method) for the whole installation can accidentally apply uneven pressure to one side or the other, requiring monkeying to correct... a good potential to bend the seal! So... the flat piece of wood really helps prevent that.
 

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1998 T100 SR5 2WD
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I was shown to remove the outer bearing and washer and rethread the retaining nut back on the spindle. Pull the hub assembly off and the inner bearing will remove the inner grease seal without any issues. ;)
 
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