Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I drive to the shops only a few km and it will not start again untill it cools down some hours later

engine is not overheating and it has a spark , fuel pump is 6 months old

any ideas?

Ross:sosad:
 

·
ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
Joined
·
368 Posts
Yes.

Check the codes, key on, engine off. If you have codes, run the diags in the prescribed manner using the online manuals.


Check fuel pressure and volume (a minimum of one pint pumped in a maximum of 30 seconds). Even with a new pump, you may not have the volume due to a restricted fuel filter. I would also routinely check the fuel pressure regulator at this time.

With these tests showing no problem, look into testing the temp sensors that help control injector pulsewidth. An OBDII scan tool is very handy for this kind of failure. Nothing beats being able to monitor live data.

What this most likely comes down to is an improper amount of fuel being delivered by the injectors for the temperature of the engine when it is asked to start.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,403 Posts
The service manual should have a prioritized matrix of problems causing difficultly starting when the engine is hot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
timebuilder said:
I would also routinely check the fuel pressure regulator at this time.
I'm betting on this one. Common warm start problem with older BMW's.
We rule out vapor lock with FI .....right timebuilder ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the replies, my mechanic just informed me that the fuel pump is gone ...AGAIN..go figure

Ross
 

·
ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
Joined
·
368 Posts
Well at least you have some sort of warranty for the pump, since it's less than a year in the car.

As long as we can maintain pressure, we don't have a vapor lock problem with EFI, but we did get a bunch of new problems. Before mixture control carburetors, we had basic mechanical parts that withstood tremendous abuse. Overheat that Olds V-8? Just let it cool and fill'er up again. Replace the thermostat (or that bypass hose, when it explodes, lol) and you're back in business.

For every advance, there is a set of costs. For example, on some Dodge trucks, the microscopic clay used in the refining process (so fine it made it through the filter) would build up in the fuel rail until it began to block fuel to the injectors, one at a time. Fuel pressure regulators on the Fords of the last decade would suffer a rupture of the diaphragm, and the vacuum hose would then begin to deliver raw fuel into the intake manifold. The clicking injectors would so distract Buick owners that GM had to install a plastic shield to keep the noise down on the 3800 SII motor. Then we have the fuel distributor on the Vortec 4.3L going bad (not to mention the rock of carbon that would form in the EGR valve) the idle actuator on the Ford CFI that would make a car stall at every light, and everybody's favorite, the in-tank fuel pump.

My beemer didn't have FI. I had the carbuereted hemi-style 4 cylinder in my 1968 2002, with the same cam-driven fuel pump they used on the R-series bike of the time period. Not a great car, and it had a bad head gasket the entire time I owned it, but it sure was fun as long as you didn't drive stop-and-go in the city, and you were willing to replace the second gear synchronizer ring every 40k miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
timebuilder said:
Well at least you have some sort of warranty for the pump, since it's less than a year in the car.

As long as we can maintain pressure, we don't have a vapor lock problem with EFI, but we did get a bunch of new problems. Before mixture control carburetors, we had basic mechanical parts that withstood tremendous abuse. Overheat that Olds V-8? Just let it cool and fill'er up again. Replace the thermostat (or that bypass hose, when it explodes, lol) and you're back in business.

For every advance, there is a set of costs. For example, on some Dodge trucks, the microscopic clay used in the refining process (so fine it made it through the filter) would build up in the fuel rail until it began to block fuel to the injectors, one at a time. Fuel pressure regulators on the Fords of the last decade would suffer a rupture of the diaphragm, and the vacuum hose would then begin to deliver raw fuel into the intake manifold. The clicking injectors would so distract Buick owners that GM had to install a plastic shield to keep the noise down on the 3800 SII motor. Then we have the fuel distributor on the Vortec 4.3L going bad (not to mention the rock of carbon that would form in the EGR valve) the idle actuator on the Ford CFI that would make a car stall at every light, and everybody's favorite, the in-tank fuel pump.

My beemer didn't have FI. I had the carbuereted hemi-style 4 cylinder in my 1968 2002, with the same cam-driven fuel pump they used on the R-series bike of the time period. Not a great car, and it had a bad head gasket the entire time I owned it, but it sure was fun as long as you didn't drive stop-and-go in the city, and you were willing to replace the second gear synchronizer ring every 40k miles.

Yeah those were the days... .putting a warranty claim in as we speak ..anyway thanks again


Ross
 

·
Registered
2002 Camry
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
Fuel pressure regulators on the Fords of the last decade would suffer a rupture of the diaphragm, and the vacuum hose would then begin to deliver raw fuel into the intake manifold. The clicking injectors would so distract Buick owners that GM had to install a plastic shield

My friend, this is the Camry forum, and i wouldnt bring it up except that what you say is no doubt true. Thus explaining why we all bought Toyotas, since Ford is gling broke, and GM is standing by for ditto.
 

·
ASE Master, now Realtor
A 1989 Camry
Joined
·
368 Posts
I mention it because it is relevant to the principle that there is no perfect mechanical system. The more complicated a mechanism, the more attention is required to avoid entropy. The Toyota Corona my dad drove in the early 1970's was no more durable than a Mustang of the same year.

Understanding other systems improves our understanding of our own. Virtually all electronic fuel injection is built using patented designs owned by Bosch, for example. While it is easy to deride Ford for their foibles, it is interesting to note that import labor costs at Toyota are far less than the unionized "Big Three," and then there is the difference between a production line driven by "the contract" and one driven by bringing honor to the ancestors. While folks making cars in Kentucky don't have the same cultural foundations for their drive to excellence as the typical Japanese workers do, the mindset of the corporate oversight is fundamentally different in character.

What's happening to American car building is similar to what happened to American Steel. New business models and competing countries with lower labor costs and the latest technology are winning out over unionized workers in aging American plants.

Declaring bankruptcy is inevitable in that situation. Then, you will see Ford and GM reborn, perhaps even using different names, with not a UAW worker to be seen and no defined benefit pension cost, a high incidence of robotic lines, and a low incidence of human work, and these new entities will use the knowledge gained from Toyota, Fuji Heavy Industries, and others just as the Japanese learned from us in the 1940's and 1950's in order to become what they are today.

In order to know who you are and where you are going, it's helpful to know where you have been, and why.

But, as I said, nothing is perfect. Ask a Tundra owner about his engine's piston slap that's driving him crazy, and ask him what Toyota is doing about it. Then, ask him about the F-150 he's been looking at.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top