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Toyota E11 (8th gen), 4E-FE 1.3
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just had the refrigerant filled up after running without ac for a year.
Initially the AC would not budge at all.
I got it to work somehow by manually turning the ac clutch to see if it was stuck. It is now possible to turn it (on cold engine) and cool air is blown from the vents for a while. Then, as the engine gets warm, temp meter at half scale, the ac stops & the ac light starts flashing.
From that point on, until the engine gets cool, it's impossible to start it on warm engine, get the flashing light 100% of the time.
The compressor appears to be working on cold engine, stops only on warm.
Relays seem to be good, just in case swapped horn relay for ac mg relay. There are two fan relays I haven't got around to testing thoroughly yet.
The ac magnetic clutch coil measures 4.3-4.4 ohm. Engine is 4EFE 1.3, denso compressor.
 

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1997 Corolla
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5,302 Posts
Are all the condenser/radiator fans working? It sounds like the freon pressure may get too high and the system is shutting itself off to prevent further damage. I also seem to recall some AC systems can sense if the compressor clutch is slipping and the AC light will flash and the AC will shut down. When the freon is cool/low pressure the compressor clutch may not slip, then later it starts slipping when it has to compress the higher pressure freon.
 

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Toyota E11 (8th gen), 4E-FE 1.3
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I was going to check the fans today. Any idea what impendance to expect?

Sensor:
The sensor on the bottom of the compressor (a Denso SCS08C 442100-1010) shown in the attached schematic does have an ac magnetic cluster / thermo / lock sensor. That will be difficult to diagnose outside of a workshop.

V Belt:
When the engine gets warm, with the AC inoperative, power steering requires more effort of me to turn the steering wheel so perhaps the two are related. I could easily replace could be the V belt that drives the AC compressor & power steering. By far the cheapest to replace.
 

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1997 Corolla
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5,302 Posts
Not sure of the impedance of the fans, but I know they should come on when the AC is on.

If the belt is slipping that could explain it. Or the compressor isn't turning and it's prevent the belt from turning the other pulleys.

Try turning the AC on after sitting for a while. Then observe the belt for any slipping or anything unusual with the compressor.
 

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2012 Corolla CE
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981 Posts
Same thing happened on my 99. The light was blinking and the a/c was not blowing cold air. The compressor clutch was kaput. I didn't go ahead with the repair since my plan was to get a new car.
 

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Toyota E11 (8th gen), 4E-FE 1.3
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Just had the leak fixed and the coolant added, now the AC turned on fine.
Drove it for a while, after leaving the shop the AC light would start blinking again after a bit.
At the shop, the AC started working again. The thicker AC pipe was clearly cold.
The engine ran on idle for a bit and the AC would go blink again.
Now the same pipe has got considerably hotter. Once it gets warm, no amount of start attempts can coerce the compressor to stay on but for a few seconds.
While stationery and on warm engine, the radiator fan appears to be turning on. The AC fan turns on as long as AC is turned on and functional. When the light stops flashing, the AC fan disengages.
 

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マズダスピード3
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Has the shop been able to detect the leak? Sounds like a gross leak to me. Ask them to put a dye in the ac to see if it leaks.
 

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Toyota E11 (8th gen), 4E-FE 1.3
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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
THe shop fixed the pipe oozing ac oil (see the original leak attached
338211
) & claim tested with nitrogen. No reason to question they did not.
There could indeed be a leak elsewhere.
Just measured the impendance again on the clutch coil today, 5.1 ohms, a bit on the high side, but close to the 2-5 ohm range that apparently indicates its good. The shop agreed to take a look at her in on Friday.
The coil on the scrapyard AC compressor that just came in today measures 4.7-4.8 ohms, not sure if that's any difference.
 
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