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This was posted to save owners of 7th Gen Celicas the problems I had because of hard to get information:

You can read more of my story below but the trick is:.. Drive the Celica up on ramps that are at least 8" tall, and 10" is better.. The culprit to improper bleeding of air bubbles out this system is the location of the Heater Core Hoses in relation to the Top of the radiator. It is 8" to 10" higher than the radiator.. So when lifting the reservoir up above the radiator as recommended it is limited by hose lengths, and the chance of getting the air that is trapped in that 10" height difference between the radiator and the heater hoses is nearly impossible if not impossible. As you read my story below you will see that 2 hours and multiple other sessions of trying to get the heater to put out heat was fixed in 1 minute... Drive the car up on to ramps and follow the bleeding procedure and you shall have no problems if it goes like mine did.. What a relief.


So... Thank you for your recommendation.. As I was surfing around last night I found a couple of other people in other threads had mentioned putting the nose of the car up in the air or bleed on a steep hill.. So today the first thing I did was get my ramps out and drive it up on them.. I took a level and 2 pieces of wood the same length, "about" 12".. Set them on the top of the radiator and one on the top of the Heater hoses.. Sure enough they were now level. It took 8" ramps to bring the heater hoses up to the level of the top of the radiator.. Within 1 minute heat was pouring out of the vents.. It was like a miracle.. So all that was stopping an effective bleed was about 8" of height discrepency between the heater hoses and the radiator.. FOR THE LIFE OF ME.. I do not understand why Toyota in their wisdom does not make this very clear.. There is no wonder that getting an 8" length of hose x 2 had enough air in them to stop the water pump from having enough force to over come that situation.. Only an electric water pump would have hope of pushing water up that high..

So all of the problems I have read which is dozens and dozens of celica owners that can NEVER get a good positive air bleed done is because of this one issue.

I am considering posting this under its own title for other people such as myself that have had major issues with this. It can also cause long term problems if running around with intermittent heat spikes due to air bubbles. I am assuming that occasionally because of road bumps and driving and turning that occasionally the heater probably worked.. But then you drive on flat land for a while and sure enough the Air Bubble is going to reassert itself at that same spot in the system.. Until it gets jostled around enough to allow the coolant to make it's way back through the heater core, only for another Heat spike as the air bubble goes through the water pump and/or thermostat.. A vicious cycle..

Anyway.. It is working like a champ so far.. Hoping we have found the problem, which included a leaky water pump seal. But I believe it was exacerbated by the condition of air in the system.. Since replacing the radiator a few weeks ago we never did have a good "bleed".. Certainly the heat spikes and lack of coolant through the water pump would eventually cause premature failure on a new pump let alone one with xxxxx miles on it..

I am going to post this under a new thread. Titled: Air bleeding problems solved for Coolant systems of 7th Gen Celicas..


Thanks Bitter

String
 

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Great post, Stringpickin. Here is a trick that works on any car, also, if you have access to a coolant system pressure tester that fits your car. You know, the one that you fasten to the radiator and pump up until the gauge reads in range for your car? Fill up the system as much as you can. Turn the heater controls to max hot, but don't start the engine. If your heater core connections are one above the other, take the top hose off. If they are horizontal, it doesn't matter which one you take off. Clamp off the hose and leave the heater pipe open. Add just a little pressure to the system; it does't take much. Wait until the coolant flows out of the heater core. Plug the heater core and release the clamp on the hose just enough for it to flow. When the hose is flowing, just start the hose back on the core pipe, but angle it down and leave a crack at the top. Keep the pressure on until just coolant flows out of that crack and then stuff the hose back on.

Works every time, any car. Sometimes it's not practical because of access to heater hoses, but for those that are, this can be a life saver.
 

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Hey there.. Yes that would indeed work.. Sort of what a shop equipped with the vacuum/pressure bleed set up does. If the dern waterpumps actually put out a bit more than bleak pressure there would be no problems as well.. Advantage goes to electric water pumps..

All I can say is so far as reported today.. Water level is "exactly" where it was when we quit bleeding and filling the system. The many times before we had to keep adding and adding but never got that air lock out of it until the simple and quite easy and logical step of driving the dern thing up on some ramps.. No wonder one NEVER had trouble in the old days with air bubbles.. My many chevies and etc.. the top of the radiator was always the highest point of the coolant system..

This is a very valuable and yet quite simple procedure that I will pass on to as many as I know.. no pumps, no buckets, no extension hoses, no nothing, but a couple of ramps.. And for people that don't have ramps or a quite steep hill they can simply jack the front end up... WELL worth the peace of mind and ease it brings..

All the best..
 
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