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2015 Camry XSE V6
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Discussion Starter #1
I know the standard brake bleed sequence (rr, lr, fr, fl), but I also know that each modern ABS car has a specific bleed sequence laid out in the service manual for the car. The bleed sequence from the service manual routinely deviates from the “standard” bleed sequence quoted above.

Question:
Does anyone have the bleed sequence specified for our 7th gen Camry’s?
 

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you can start from any wheel. there is no difference, because abs has a separate line for each caliper. start from rear right, as it has the longest line
 

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Discussion Starter #5
you can start from any wheel. there is no difference, because abs has a separate line for each caliper. start from rear right, as it has the longest line
Got it, thanks.

I actually just performed a full brake bleed and replaced my front brakes including larger dual piston front calipers.

The pedal feels a bit spongy now, so I was wondering if I got the order wrong.
 

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Got it, thanks.

I actually just performed a full brake bleed and replaced my front brakes including larger dual piston front calipers.

The pedal feels a bit spongy now, so I was wondering if I got the order wrong.
Your spongy brake pedal was not caused by the bleeding order, since none of the individual wheel caliper bleeds should have introduced any air into the system.

I use a home-made vacuum electric pump/jar on each wheel cylinder, so there is always vacuum present when the bleed nipple is open. And I completely flush the reservoir with the first wheel's caliper bleed, so the order of the rest of the wheel's caliper bleeds shouldn't matter.
I bleed each wheel cylinder until the fluid comes out clear, only the first one uses a lot of fluid, about eight fl. oz's iir.
Also I don't pour fluid into the reservoir while the vacuum bleeding is going on, since I don't want air bubbles bouncing around in the reservoir which could get pulled out into the lines.
In any case, you don't want the reservoir level to go low enough for air to get pulled into the system. And you don't want to ever release the brake pedal with the bleed nipple open, you should close the nipple before the pedal bottoms out.
It may take a lot of coordinated pedal pumping to purge the air from your brakes. And if only one diagonal circuit has air in it you might find this to be unnoticeable, but it will affect braking response to two of the wheels.

I made this vacuum apparatus when I was a teenager, back in the 70's. It was a 1950's aquarium air pressure pump but I reversed the cylinder off-axis angle by jamming a screw under the lower edge of the cylinder, and also added a reverse-direction one-way valve to improve it's pumping performance.
 

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2015 Camry XSE V6
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Discussion Starter #7
Your spongy brake pedal was not caused by the bleeding order, since none of the individual wheel caliper bleeds should have introduced any air into the system.

I use a home-made vacuum electric pump/jar on each wheel cylinder, so there is always vacuum present when the bleed nipple is open. And I completely flush the reservoir with the first wheel's caliper bleed, so the order of the rest of the wheel's caliper bleeds shouldn't matter.
I bleed each wheel cylinder until the fluid comes out clear, only the first one uses a lot of fluid, about eight fl. oz's iir.
Also I don't pour fluid into the reservoir while the vacuum bleeding is going on, since I don't want air bubbles bouncing around in the reservoir which could get pulled out into the lines.
In any case, you don't want the reservoir level to go low enough for air to get pulled into the system. And you don't want to ever release the brake pedal with the bleed nipple open, you should close the nipple before the pedal bottoms out.
It may take a lot of coordinated pedal pumping to purge the air from your brakes. And if only one diagonal circuit has air in it you might find this to be unnoticeable, but it will affect braking response to two of the wheels.

I made this vacuum apparatus when I was a teenager, back in the 70's. It was a 1950's aquarium air pressure pump but I reversed the cylinder off-axis angle by jamming a screw under the lower edge of the cylinder, and also added a reverse-direction one-way valve to improve it's pumping performance.
Thanks for your reply.

I drove my wife’s 2014 V6 Highlander today, then subsequently immediately drove my Camry (with the upgraded Highlander Calipers). They feel exactly the same.

I think I was either just mistaken yesterday, or it’s possible that these calipers have a slightly different feel.

 

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I know the standard brake bleed sequence (rr, lr, fr, fl), but I also know that each modern ABS car has a specific bleed sequence laid out in the service manual for the car. The bleed sequence from the service manual routinely deviates from the “standard” bleed sequence quoted above.

Question:
Does anyone have the bleed sequence specified for our 7th gen Camry’s?
I bleed mine by opening all 4 bleeder screws and allowing them to drip. I keep the master cylinder full. An hour or so and it's done. I attach hoses to each bleeder screw into bottles so as to not create a mess.
 
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