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1997 Corolla
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I think that rubber just prevents water from going under the plastic cowl, or it is just a separator between the plastic and glass. Water that gets under there should just drain out the side.
 

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1995 Toyota Corolla
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1,388 Posts
Discussion Starter #707
Is there a procedure, Haynes or otherwise, for changing the cam and crank seals when doing the timing belt? Do the old ones just pull out and the new ones push in?
 

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1997 Corolla
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The seals are pressed into the holes in the block and head, but the seals' metal shells are thin metal which is easy to destroy in order to get them out. One method is to drill a small hole in the metal shell and then thread a drywall screw or something like that into the hole, to use as a point to pull on. You could also use a small hook implement. With the drill you want to be extra careful to stop the drill and not push it inside at all once you've got the hole you need.
You want to be careful to not scratch the block's and head's mating surfaces where the seal sits.
I'm pretty sure it's OK to smear some RTV or some sort of sealer on the new seal's shell where it contacts the block or head.

Also, another thing to consider and inspect is the surfaces on the crank snout and cam, where the rubber part of the seal 'rides,' and make sure that the rubber hasn't cut a groove into them. That gets caused by seals where the rubber has hardened.

If you do find a groove in the crank snout or cam, (or whatever part it is which the cam seal rides on) you can install the seal without driving it all of the way in, so that the rubber rides outside the groove. Or maybe you could drive the seal slightly deeper for the same effect inboard of the groove.
Also you might be able to hit the groove with some sandpaper or emery cloth if it's not too deep, and keep the edges of the groove from cutting up your new seal - but, you have to be very careful to not take off too much metal which would make it too narrow for the seal to 'grab' it tightly enough to keep oil from passing through.
Google to see what the procedure really is, but if left with only my own devices, I would probably try starting with some 600 grit. I'd imagine that you would want to go up to a higher grit from there. I'm guessing that you want the metal surface pretty much polished, but I'm not sure.
For example I know that you don't want your cylinder walls polished, because that inhibits the piston rings' seal against the wall. Cylinders get a "cross-hatch" pattern, via a honing attachment on a drill.
 

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1997 Corolla
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Additionally, I think everything just slides off of the crank, exposing that seal in its entirety, but you will need to unbolt and remove the cam gear for access to that seal.
 

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1995 Toyota Corolla
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Discussion Starter #710 (Edited)
I've noticed that with 4 grown men in the Corolla, going over bumps sometimes, even slowly, leads to loud groaning, possibly of the suspension. Sometimes from the front, and sometimes from the back, but only on the right side.

The car rides fine otherwise with no suspension sounds or clunks. I'll have the suspension checked out.
 

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1997 Corolla
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If you can find 800 lbs. of weight to put in the car at home, that will duplicate those conditions. From there you can rock the car and see if you can pinpoint the source of the noise.

How old are your struts? It could also be something like a control arm bushing.
 

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1995 Toyota Corolla
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Discussion Starter #712
The suspension has never been touched.

It must be the rubber bushings, it sounds like this video at 0:18, except only with a full load and rarely. Can the bushings be changed?

 

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1997 Corolla
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Yes, and it's typically a pretty big PITA...
 

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1997 Corolla
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Hm, mine weren't that bad. I have seen on the forum though that some people have issues with the small nut/bolt (I forget) that's on the front bushing brackets.
There ya go. I have no direct knowledge of these car, with regard to bushings, but it figures that it's not as difficult on a Toyota.
 

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1995 Toyota Corolla
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Discussion Starter #716
Changing the struts themselves seems relatively simple if you buy the whole assembly, just a few bolts holding the strut on. Has anyone here changed them? I've heard KYB is the OE manufacturer.

I don't understand why someone wouldn't buy the entire unit, the prices aren't too different.
 

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1996 Toyota Corolla
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10,121 Posts
Changing the struts if they're an assembly is ridiculously easy. Three nuts up top, two bolts below, and the brake lines and such. In the rear you either disconnect the brake line (have to bleed brakes) or dremel a slot into the tab.

KYB is definitely the way to go. But remember you DO need an alignment afterwards.
 
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