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I have been trying to get into summer hiking shape, I have been eating a bunch of fresh green beans and continuing to exercise. I got down to as low as I have been in 3 to 5 years. If I can loose another 10 lbs of extra fat I'd be ecstatic.

I have been craving Salmon all week but no store here has it when I get off like they usually do. I hope to get 5 or 10 miles in tonight and then maybe a ribeye :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Looking forward to it :) I took my backpack with me today with water food and a sweatshirt. I was 5 to 7 lbs heavier than usual and I can sure feel it.

Normally on a cool day I can do 8-10 miles with just my camera bag and 4 10oz bottles. Good thing I brought more today.

They said it takes 9 hours, I was back at the sign in 5 :)
 

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I wasn't able to do it this year, but next year I'm planning a climb over the Grapevine Mountains in Death Valley from the valley floor to an old abandoned homestead on the other side in Nevada where I'll have a vehicle waiting to drive back to Beatty. Be a hike from 300 feet and max out at 9,600 feet, 17 total miles, and from sunup to sundown to complete it. Want to go? :D

We can get Dickson in on that....I want to put the hurt on him too. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Happy Easter TN :D





Yes I do! What is the temp forcast? 50s or 60s at the start at sunrise? How can you carry enough water? And do you use a tracker with pre laid routes? I know you said you blaze your own trail mostly. And another thought on that, how do you know what's public and what will get you shot?
 

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Yes I do! What is the temp forcast? 50s or 60s at the start at sunrise? How can you carry enough water? And do you use a tracker with pre laid routes? I know you said you blaze your own trail mostly. And another thought on that, how do you know what's public and what will get you shot?
That's the problem with Death Valley, the temperature in winter can vary between 90 degrees at the valley floor and as little as 50 degrees for a day time high. That's the toughest part about planning hikes in DV because the weather is so changeable, and so when I set aside a date/s to do a huge hike I always have an alternate in case hot weather nixes it.

On a hike like this, though, it can still be done. Three years ago I did a similar hike, maxing out at 7,300 feet and crossing over two canyons and exiting back down to the valley, 28 miles in total over 22 hours. Started the hike just before sunrise at about 48 degrees, temp rose to about 80 by mid-morning at around 3,500 feet in elevation, and then by noon at 7,300 feet the temp was about 60 due to the altitude. By the time we started the descent and sunset arrived the temp was also back to around 65 and slowly wound down after that. I usually shoot for a day where the expected temperature in the valley floor is 80 or under, and that works out well as not too hot, not too cold all day long.

Water I carried/will carry 1 1/3 gallon in my backpack, but what I do additionally is "water-up" before leaving my vehicle and pound down 16 to 20 ounces of water right there, then carry a 16-ounce bottle in my hand and drink that about one hour into the hike. That gives me the water margin to go further during the day with a limited supply in my backpack. Another thing I do is scout out springs and seeps in the broad area for any location I hike, and on that last crossover I did the primary spring available had run dry according to rangers. :dunno: Bummer that, but at least it was a "known quantity" before heading out and not something I depended on. For the hike I'm talking about next year there is a year-round spring located at the stopping point at the old homestead, so I know I have good water to replenish us right away.

I always research my route and establish key GPS waypoints, then have them programmed into my primary and secondary GPS units. However, being "old school" you might call me I navigate strictly by topo map and would only revert to the GPS if lost which has never happened in my lifetime and shouldn't based on my background. Anyway, navigation is by map and my Mark One eyeballs.

Hike like this is almost entirely on DV park property, and some of the land on the Nevada side is BLM land. I always research where I hike, but the one good thing about California and much of western Nevada is it's either federal or state parks, BLM land, or otherwise open reserves. It's not common here to run onto private property, and even then people are friendly and accommodating. It's not bad like what Gene has described from his area of PA.

BTW, rather than have these replies get lost in the Random Thoughts thread I'm going to move them to a new thread here in OT so we can discuss it more. Kind of has relevance too to the Bug Out thread that will make reading this kind of stuff easier in the future. :thumbsup:
 
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I wasn't able to do it this year, but next year I'm planning a climb over the Grapevine Mountains in Death Valley from the valley floor to an old abandoned homestead on the other side in Nevada where I'll have a vehicle waiting to drive back to Beatty. Be a hike from 300 feet and max out at 9,600 feet, 17 total miles, and from sunup to sundown to complete it. Want to go? :D

We can get Dickson in on that....I want to put the hurt on him too. :lol:

What are you fixing to carry on this hike? How much water you fixing to carry?

You"re climbing over 500 feet an hour. That's hefty climbing, Kevin.
 

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What are you fixing to carry on this hike? How much water you fixing to carry?

You"re climbing over 500 feet an hour. That's hefty climbing, Kevin.
Check my reply above, Gene....1 1/3 gallons in my backpack (and max I'll carry 1 1/2), but typically hand carry another 16-ounce bottle for the first hour in. Also, everyone sweats differently, and that can be a huge factor. For me, I am smaller and have a low body mass, low body fat, and so I readily shed heat compared to most other people. Very often people will comment to me, "Don't you ever sweat?" Well, no, not really, I shed heat through my skin and don't need to sweat much. That's why I've always said I'd have been the first to die hitting the water if I'd been on the Titanic.

For the crossover hike we maintained 900 feet per hour, and including a breakfast stop and a snack stop, we climbed 7,000 feet in eight hours. We were on a schedule to get past some dry falls before sundown on the crossover hike, which is why I set a faster pace. Most often I'd climb about 700 to 800 feet per hour, depending on the terrain.

I'm also not an asshole when I hike, so like a ship convoy I'll accommodate the slower/slowest hiker and walk at their pace. However, if someone wants me to put the hurt on or there's a time schedule to be met, I take no prisoners. However, anyone who hikes with me will have all these issues hashed out ahead of time, because as much as I don't want to kill someone I also don't like being held back when I don't want to be.
 

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We can get Dickson in on that....I want to put the hurt on him too. :lol:
Make sure to bring 2 stretchers, and 2 shovels in case they no longer need the stretchers. :lol:
 

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Dickson will need at least one hot chick with a sidearm along, so that will slow us down to 300 feet per hour on the climb which will bring undeserved ease of exertion upon him. :lol:
 

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A hot chick along tends to increase exertion from my experience. :naughty:
 
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Check my reply above, Gene....1 1/3 gallons in my backpack (and max I'll carry 1 1/2), but typically hand carry another 16-ounce bottle for the first hour in.
I'd have to salt the water. The food I eat causes me to piss out a lot of sodium. I'd cramp up or keel over otherwise.

For the crossover hike we maintained 900 feet per hour, and including a breakfast stop and a snack stop, we climbed 7,000 feet in eight hours. We were on a schedule to get past some dry falls before sundown on the crossover hike, which is why I set a faster pace. Most often I'd climb about 700 to 800 feet per hour, depending on the terrain.
You're not going to do camping?

I'm also not an asshole when I hike, so like a ship convoy I'll accommodate the slower/slowest hiker and walk at their pace. However, if someone wants me to put the hurt on or there's a time schedule to be met, I take no prisoners. However, anyone who hikes with me will have all these issues hashed out ahead of time, because as much as I don't want to kill someone I also don't like being held back when I don't want to be.
Death March time!

You're gonna have to bring a young lady along to shame Dickson into picking up the pace.
 

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I'd have to salt the water. The food I eat causes me to piss out a lot of sodium. I'd cramp up or keel over otherwise.
I use a mix: Too much water and you run into trouble not replacing enough electrolytes. What I do is take at least one entire one-liter bottle and mix Pedialyte powder into it, sometimes two bottles if it's particularly warm out or the hiking is rigorous. IMO, Pedialyte is the best all around source to replace electrolytes and puts Gatorade to shame. Doctors often recommend Pedialyte to adults suffering from dysentery/severe diarrhea to replace essential electrolytes. I also carry, though, at least a half dozen Pedialyte powder packets as part of my survival loadout to use for any relevant reason.


You're not going to do camping?
.
Sometimes I do, very often I don't. It's a personal thing: As much as I hate packing in tons of gear to camp multiple days overnight, I also like to push myself to the edge of my limits. Thus the reason some of my more difficult hikes run 24 to 48 hours, basically non-stop except for meals, rest stops, or perhaps taking a nap on the hard ground. I don't recommend it for everyone, but I dig it. I don't nickname them death marches for nothing. But with friends, they'd be fun marches. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
That's the problem with Death Valley, the temperature in winter can vary between 90 degrees at the valley floor and as little as 50 degrees for a day time high. That's the toughest part about planning hikes in DV because the weather is so changeable, and so when I set aside a date/s to do a huge hike I always have an alternate in case hot weather nixes it.

On a hike like this, though, it can still be done. Three years ago I did a similar hike, maxing out at 7,300 feet and crossing over two canyons and exiting back down to the valley, 28 miles in total over 22 hours. Started the hike just before sunrise at about 48 degrees, temp rose to about 80 by mid-morning at around 3,500 feet in elevation, and then by noon at 7,300 feet the temp was about 60 due to the altitude. By the time we started the descent and sunset arrived the temp was also back to around 65 and slowly wound down after that. I usually shoot for a day where the expected temperature in the valley floor is 80 or under, and that works out well as not too hot, not too cold all day long.

Water I carried/will carry 1 1/3 gallon in my backpack, but what I do additionally is "water-up" before leaving my vehicle and pound down 16 to 20 ounces of water right there, then carry a 16-ounce bottle in my hand and drink that about one hour into the hike. That gives me the water margin to go further during the day with a limited supply in my backpack. Another thing I do is scout out springs and seeps in the broad area for any location I hike, and on that last crossover I did the primary spring available had run dry according to rangers. :dunno: Bummer that, but at least it was a "known quantity" before heading out and not something I depended on. For the hike I'm talking about next year there is a year-round spring located at the stopping point at the old homestead, so I know I have good water to replenish us right away.

I always research my route and establish key GPS waypoints, then have them programmed into my primary and secondary GPS units. However, being "old school" you might call me I navigate strictly by topo map and would only revert to the GPS if lost which has never happened in my lifetime and shouldn't based on my background. Anyway, navigation is by map and my Mark One eyeballs.

Hike like this is almost entirely on DV park property, and some of the land on the Nevada side is BLM land. I always research where I hike, but the one good thing about California and much of western Nevada is it's either federal or state parks, BLM land, or otherwise open reserves. It's not common here to run onto private property, and even then people are friendly and accommodating. It's not bad like what Gene has described from his area of PA.

BTW, rather than have these replies get lost in the Random Thoughts thread I'm going to move them to a new thread here in OT so we can discuss it more. Kind of has relevance too to the Bug Out thread that will make reading this kind of stuff easier in the future. :thumbsup:
Old school navigation, I haven't done that since my boy scout days. I would need a refresher.

As far as water I did 5 and a half hours 3500 some feet up and down 8.4 miles with at least 30 minutes goofing off at the top on about 3 liters and 5 or 6 granola bars doing the Guadalupe peak. Then I drove 2 hours and worked 12. That said I was pretty whipped and in better shape than now to boot. I've got a ways to go before I would attempt what amounts to 3 times that. As far as sweating, I would think it is very dry? That should help. I have found your pace dictates how much water you use in large degree. I can do 3.5 mph on FLAT land for a long time on less than 40-50 oz. Up the pace or amount of direct midday sun and it increases fast. I do hydrate a lot and avoid caffeine etc before I undertake such things. The Guadalupe peak was brutal right off the bat and then became more gradual for a lot of the rest of it. The McKittrick Ridge was actually a harder climb overall. The other day I averaged over 3mph with 1762ft of climbing over the 8.63 miles. My pace would surely drop under the best circumstances after around mile 15. Yesterday it hit hard at around 10 miles but I know why that happened.
How much does your pack weigh typically?


Check my reply above, Gene....1 1/3 gallons in my backpack (and max I'll carry 1 1/2), but typically hand carry another 16-ounce bottle for the first hour in. Also, everyone sweats differently, and that can be a huge factor. For me, I am smaller and have a low body mass, low body fat, and so I readily shed heat compared to most other people. Very often people will comment to me, "Don't you ever sweat?" Well, no, not really, I shed heat through my skin and don't need to sweat much. That's why I've always said I'd have been the first to die hitting the water if I'd been on the Titanic.

For the crossover hike we maintained 900 feet per hour, and including a breakfast stop and a snack stop, we climbed 7,000 feet in eight hours. We were on a schedule to get past some dry falls before sundown on the crossover hike, which is why I set a faster pace. Most often I'd climb about 700 to 800 feet per hour, depending on the terrain.

I'm also not an asshole when I hike, so like a ship convoy I'll accommodate the slower/slowest hiker and walk at their pace. However, if someone wants me to put the hurt on or there's a time schedule to be met, I take no prisoners. However, anyone who hikes with me will have all these issues hashed out ahead of time, because as much as I don't want to kill someone I also don't like being held back when I don't want to be.

I hear you on being slowed down. I have gotten very used to just me. When I did the peak my buddy went with me. He was in shape so it was him wanting to go while I was snapping pics. (Worried about getting to work)

Usually when I push it it's when I'm squeezing a hike in around work (Every time in some ways)
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
I use a mix: Too much water and you run into trouble not replacing enough electrolytes. What I do is take at least one entire one-liter bottle and mix Pedialyte powder into it, sometimes two bottles if it's particularly warm out or the hiking is rigorous. IMO, Pedialyte is the best all around source to replace electrolytes and puts Gatorade to shame. Doctor's often recommend Pedialyte to adults suffering from dysentery/severe diarrhea to replace essential electrolytes. I also carry, though, at least a half dozen Pedialyte powder packets as part of my survival loadout to use for any relevant reason.




Sometimes I do, very often I don't. It's a personal thing: As much as I hate packing in tons of gear to camp multiple days overnight, I also like to push myself to the edge of my limits. Thus the reason some of my more difficult hikes run 24 to 48 hours, basically non-stop except for meals, rest stops, or perhaps taking a nap on the hard ground. I don't recommend it for everyone, but I dig it. I don't nickname them death marches for nothing. But with friends, they'd be fun marches. :)
I think if I was focused and started just before dawn I could get a 20 mile day reliably although I haven't done so. I like to push as well and find its a necessity due to work. I'm always squeezing in a 5 or 10 mile hike somewhere I've never been in the middle of an 8-12 hour drive to work. Or before/after work depending on our schedule. All of that said I have never done overnight. I can't working on the road. I also like to push in and out when the pamphlets/signs etc say you need an overnight :D

For me this is the perfect time of year in some ways. Cool enough sweat is minimal, warm enough you don't need a coat. I can travel with just me and my camera bag with its 40 oz and hammer out 8 or 10 miles as I said before. Once it gets hotter it becomes, carry a backpack because you need a lot of water/you need a lot of water because of the heavy ass pack :lol:
 
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