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Street-Cruiser
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Discussion Starter #1
First off, I have a '94 corolla, and I want to relocate the battery to the trunk in order to put in a custom CAI. I searched for all the battery relocation info I could find, and noticed that people mentioned marine boxes or dry-cell batteries. Are there harmful vapors that come off of the battery that need to be released and will the marine box be safe enough? Thanks for any info....I already know how to wire it, I'm just looking for safety info and precautions. Thanks!
 

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Country Hick
2001 Nissan Pulsar
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1,339 Posts
Marine boxes are generally used for Fully sealed (maintinence free) or dry cell Marine puropose batteries... If you were to get a marine box, i would suggest getting a Marine use battery.


*edit* Normal Lead-Acid (Standard open car batteries) can give off vapours of Hydrogen, Hydrochloric Acid or Lead. All three of these are harmful and HCl is corrosive, thus Sealed batteries are the way to go.
 

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Street-Cruiser
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458 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info.
 

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Registered
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220 Posts
Canadian Tire sells spiral grid batteries that are completely sealed and can be mounted any where and in any position.
You can get either the house brand or the Orbital brand.

Hemi3TC


Ostornadoe said:
First off, I have a '94 corolla, and I want to relocate the battery to the trunk in order to put in a custom CAI. I searched for all the battery relocation info I could find, and noticed that people mentioned marine boxes or dry-cell batteries. Are there harmful vapors that come off of the battery that need to be released and will the marine box be safe enough? Thanks for any info....I already know how to wire it, I'm just looking for safety info and precautions. Thanks!
 

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Street-Cruiser
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458 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
*edit* Normal Lead-Acid (Standard open car batteries) can give off vapours of Hydrogen, Hydrochloric Acid or Lead. All three of these are harmful and HCl is corrosive, thus Sealed batteries are the way to go.
These vapors.... What if I were to get a marine box and make sure that it was airtight, maybe not possible, would it be safe?
The reason I'd rather keep this battery and not by a sealed one is that it was bought in the past 2 years, has no signs of wear, recharges fully, and a sealed battery costs a lot.

Let me know about the safety of putting a regular battery in a sealed marine box. I can do the wiring part fine. Thanks a ton for the info.:)
 

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Country Hick
2001 Nissan Pulsar
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1,339 Posts
Ostornadoe said:
These vapors.... What if I were to get a marine box and make sure that it was airtight, maybe not possible, would it be safe?
The reason I'd rather keep this battery and not by a sealed one is that it was bought in the past 2 years, has no signs of wear, recharges fully, and a sealed battery costs a lot.

Let me know about the safety of putting a regular battery in a sealed marine box. I can do the wiring part fine. Thanks a ton for the info.:)
It's not the vapours in the car that you need to worry about.. its the vapours in the box that will slowly eat away at it.. Marine Boxes are always air-tight btw.. If something is water-tight, it must also be air-tight. But on the subject of the battery again, it's probably not the best idea to put it in a marine box, however it is possible, as it will take a while to corrode.. should be fine until at least your battery wars out..

just remember tho... when you check the water levels of the battery, also check the top and sides of the box for any bubbling, peeling or corrosion. If you did not know already, batteries should be checked about once a month and only filled with de-mineralised (not distilled or tap) water, as the trace elements of the distilled or tap water can have a chemical reaction to the highly reactive acid in the battery and render it useless.

Spud
 

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Street-Cruiser
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458 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for all the info, you have been a ton of help. I think I'll just stick it in there, check it very often, and when it stops working, get a new sealed battery.... I'm probably also going to get a voltmeter gauge while i'm at it. Always wanted one since my battery died and left me without a ride. Thanks again spud. You da man :cool:
 

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Country Hick
2001 Nissan Pulsar
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1,339 Posts
what can i say... 5 years of Avanced Chemistry at high-school.. a question like this and i'm in my element :D
 

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The terrorist
1990 Corolla SR5
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3,058 Posts
Hey Ostornadoe,

I don't have a Camry, but I have an AE92 Corolla Coupe and I have already done the relocation.

I worked in an Audio/ Alarm installation shop and I made sure the process was done properly and it was 100% Safe..

I used a 4 Guage wire from the front to the back, I ran the wire with all the factory wiring to the inside of the car through the rubber gasket in the firewall. I used a split loom from the terminal to the firewall to protect the wire from heat, grease, cuts and scratches.

Ran the wire in the door jams and behind the rear quarter panel cover to the trunk. Again a split loom in the trunk to protect the wire even though it is away from everything. I mounted the Marine box on the driver side in the trunk and made sure there's enough clearance for everything to be accessible.

Now the problem I faced in the trunk was that my trunk floor is not straight, so I had to use plastic pieces to level the box, that made me use extra long screws to mount it, I had to get under the car and find the screw ends to use nuts to mount them. Make sure you carefully inspect the area where you're planning to screw the box down and make sure there are NO FUEL LINES or ELECTRICAL LINES running anywhere around there or underneath the car.

I used a circuit breaker in the back, I believe it's a 90A breaker, I did it so if anything happens (God forbid) the circuit breaker cuts off the battery from the whole car. Therefore the circuit breaker should be as close as possible to the (+) terminal. I personally mounted my Circuit breaker on the box itself, so the power wire comes into one end of the circuit breaker and another 1 foot wire goes out and into the box where the battery sits.

Under the hood I custom made a plastic box to hold the terminal and prevent it from grounding out anywhere and touching the any metal part under the hood.

You can technically acquire a ground (-) from any metal part on the frame of the car in the back. I have a couple of holes on the bottom of the trunk, so I sanded one down to the bare metal and used a 1/2" or 12mm bolt to hold it down. The ground is extremely important by the way. It has the same importance as the positive wire (if not more).

I did this all by myself, it does require time and effort but with patience it could easily be achieved.

This operation had many advantages for me:
- My terminals don't corrode anymore.
- It is a security feature since my trunk is lockable.
- Instead of running the Amp wire all the way from the front to the back, I run it from the trunk to the trunk.
- Safety is very important here, the battery is in a very safe position.
- You can always open the circuit breaker and disconnect the battery instead of removing and putting back the terminal everytime.

Oh and by the way, I am using a red top Optima battery.

If you have any questions don't hesitate to ask..
 

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Street-Cruiser
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Discussion Starter #11
Is the red top Optima battery a regular car battery? If so, how long has it been in there and does it show any signs of corrosion? Thanks, that info was helpful, I didn't think about the circuit breaker before, but since you mentioned it, it seems like a brilliant idea. Thanks again.
 

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Marine battery boxes are NOT air tight nor water proof. They are vented and the cover acts more like an umbrella than a lid. Go with an Optimax and hold down kit in your trunk and it'll work fine.
 
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