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2019 Camry XSE 2.5L A25A-FKS
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Discussion Starter #1
Ever since I had purchased the vehicle new, I had assumed that the battery is new and is fully charged.

However, I have read and learned that because of CAFE reasons, modern vehicles will not fully charged the battery to achieve tiny gains in fuel economy.

The alternator are made to not overcharge the battery. It will never be able to fully charge the battery to 100% state of charge. So over time, that will degrade our battery's life. Instead of lasting more than 5 years. It would be under 3 years.

I saw some people on here with dead battery or battery needs to be jump started. When the vehicle is less than a year old!

So I decided to check my battery, and it is showing 12.2 V. With the car running it shows 14 V.

I am posting this to see what are other people's battery reading is in the morning to see if this is a common issue.

BTW, my vehicle is Stock. NO add-ons. Ever since the COVID-19, I don't drive the vehicle often and do a few short trips, which doesn't allow the alternator to charge the battery up.
 

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It's common practice to start the car at least once every 2 days for 10 minutes to both Charge the Battery & Warm up the Engine. This helps avoid problems occurring.
 

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2018 Camry XSE V6
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Mine shows 12.3v. I also have a dashcam, with parking mode, and Openpilot that's always on. No issues.
 

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I don't think that CAFE prevents batteries from being fully charged. The problem is that high quality batteries that Toyota and other Asian manufacturers previously installed in their cars are noticeably heavier than a cheap battery. This is because a cheap battery has less lead inside the battery. The combination of lead and acid is what is used to create a chemical reaction that holds the charge.

When your OEM battery needs to be changed, you can buy a higher quality battery, such as a "Gold" instead of a "Silver" version sold at places like Advance Auto Parts or AutoZone. But some newer Toyota's with start/stop feature use newer kind of battery (EFB) that is more expensive and harder to find.

Normally, a 12V battery fully charged in good condition should be about 12.6 volts, but because of all the electronics that run even when the car is off (factory security, keyfobs, etc), it will be lower unless you completely disconnect the battery to test the voltage (not recommended).

I would recommend storing your keyfobs far away from your parked car, or buy a special pouch that blocks radio transmissions. A car battery "may" drain faster if the keyfob is close enough to be detected by the parked car.

As you mentioned, some batteries fail very quickly, but those are either the new EFB ones designed for start/stop feature (Toyota is having a problem with these), or some batteries may suffer physical internal damage due to heat and vibration that causes the internal plastic cell dividers to fail even on a fairly new battery.
 

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2018 Toyota Camry SE 2.5
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First I've heard of this, but it doesn't surprise me in the least. If CAFE is demanding water thin oils for MPG gains, then why not this? If you want to be sure your vehicles battery is always fully charged, (which is a good idea for the reasons you've stated), you can purchase a small Battery Tender Jr. (brand name), at Wal-Mart, Amazon, or most any of the chain auto parts stores. It will maintain a battery at full charge, as long as it's plugged in. But the electronics within the unit will not allow the battery to be overcharged. They operate like a trickle charger with a brain.

These units can be easily wired to the battery terminals. And they provide several type of leads and plugs that you can run under the hood, and out to the grill where you will have easy access for quick and easy plug in's and disconnects. Naturally, this would require your car being parked in a garage, near a 110V outlet. Which shouldn't be too difficult.

Also, it would require you to unplug it in the morning before departing. If the car is used frequently throughout the day, it would not need to be plugged in until it was parked for the night. I've used these units many times on motorcycles, boats, and watercraft, that see infrequent, seasonal use. They work very well for their intended purpose. They're not expensive, and are very easy to hook up. I would suggest purchasing some small cable ties with the unit. It makes for a nice neat installation when running the leads. The small 750 mA unit is more than sufficient for this purpose. And it's output is low enough so as not to jeopardize or compromise any of the electronics or computers in the vehicle that remain "hot" when the car is off.

 

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2018 Toyota Camry SE 2.5
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If you decide to go with one of these, you can pick up one of these SAE to SAE connector extensions very inexpensively. They are basically a weatherproof extension for the Battery Tender. They give you substantially more length to work with. And have a nice weatherproof connector you can mount on the vehicle wherever you choose. It just allows for more installation options, and makes the whole thing nicer and easier to install. The video shows the guy using one on his Vette. But you get the idea, and could apply it anywhere on your Toyota, that would be fast and easy to get to.


 

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Ever since I had purchased the vehicle new, I had assumed that the battery is new and is fully charged.

However, I have read and learned that because of CAFE reasons, modern vehicles will not fully charged the battery to achieve tiny gains in fuel economy.

The alternator are made to not overcharge the battery. It will never be able to fully charge the battery to 100% state of charge. So over time, that will degrade our battery's life. Instead of lasting more than 5 years. It would be under 3 years.

I saw some people on here with dead battery or battery needs to be jump started. When the vehicle is less than a year old!

So I decided to check my battery, and it is showing 12.2 V. With the car running it shows 14 V.

I am posting this to see what are other people's battery reading is in the morning to see if this is a common issue.

BTW, my vehicle is Stock. NO add-ons. Ever since the COVID-19, I don't drive the vehicle often and do a few short trips, which doesn't allow the alternator to charge the battery up.
interesting claim? Llink?
I thought the biggest danger to battery health was short trips, causing the battery to not get fully charged...
 

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2018 Toyota Camry SE 2.5
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I thought the biggest danger to battery health was short trips, causing the battery to not get fully charged...
While that doesn't help, cars have successfully been making short trips since they were first invented. All without killing off the battery. Today's vehicles have far more electronics that remain "hot" after the the car is shut down. These parasitic electrical drains are continually pulling a current flow from the battery while the vehicle sits.

Add to all of this the fact the batteries are getting smaller and smaller with limited capacity, because the automakers are continually being challenged to find places to hide them, in the limited space now left under the hood, under seats, and God knows where else, and this type of problem was bound to start surfacing. It was a matter of when, not if.

Today a car cannot sit anywhere near as long as a vehicle could before they became crammed so full of electronics, it's enough to give IBM a headache.
 

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2020 Toyota Camry XLE
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My battery died randomly in early March. I had owned the car for about a month. I think the parasitic electrical drain is definitely a thing with all the electronics. In my case they found that the DCM computer went bad and produced an open circuit which drained the battery exponentially. My original battery which they recharged is still fine. There are no dead or weak cells. I have had the dealership test it every time I have taken it in for service the last three weeks which is about 3 visits. On a side note my remote connect started working perfectly when they replaced the DCM computer. The true test for the battery will be in the summer especially here in Arizona. My car is a 2020 XLE Camry.
 

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2019 Camry XSE 2.5L A25A-FKS
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Discussion Starter #11
Mine shows 12.3v. I also have a dashcam, with parking mode, and Openpilot that's always on. No issues.
Thank you for checking in your voltage. (y)

However, flooded lead acid or AGM battery does not like to be at under 50% charged. For it to out last it's warranty, over 3 year, it needs to be very close or fully charged. And with the modern cars now days, the alternator will not fully charge the battery. The only way to fully charge is to have a battery tender.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I would recommend storing your keyfobs far away from your parked car, or buy a special pouch that blocks radio transmissions. A car battery "may" drain faster if the keyfob is close enough to be detected by the parked car.
My car is parked outside and it is not near my car at a very far distance.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
First I've heard of this, but it doesn't surprise me in the least. If CAFE is demanding water thin oils for MPG gains, then why not this? If you want to be sure your vehicles battery is always fully charged, (which is a good idea for the reasons you've stated), you can purchase a small Battery Tender Jr. (brand name), at Wal-Mart, Amazon, or most any of the chain auto parts stores. It will maintain a battery at full charge, as long as it's plugged in. But the electronics within the unit will not allow the battery to be overcharged. They operate like a trickle charger with a brain.

These units can be easily wired to the battery terminals. And they provide several type of leads and plugs that you can run under the hood, and out to the grill where you will have easy access for quick and easy plug in's and disconnects. Naturally, this would require your car being parked in a garage, near a 110V outlet. Which shouldn't be too difficult.

Also, it would require you to unplug it in the morning before departing. If the car is used frequently throughout the day, it would not need to be plugged in until it was parked for the night. I've used these units many times on motorcycles, boats, and watercraft, that see infrequent, seasonal use. They work very well for their intended purpose. They're not expensive, and are very easy to hook up. I would suggest purchasing some small cable ties with the unit. It makes for a nice neat installation when running the leads. The small 750 mA unit is more than sufficient for this purpose. And it's output is low enough so as not to jeopardize or compromise any of the electronics or computers in the vehicle that remain "hot" when the car is off.

Great advice. However, I do not have a garage and the vehicle is parked outside 24/7. There is no outlet. My only choice is to get a smart solar charger. But I do not know which one is reliable.
 

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2018 Toyota Camry SE 2.5
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For what it's worth, I try to never let my newer vehicles sit for longer than 48 hours without starting them. Followed by driving them up to full operating temperature. My older truck, (1991), is an exception. I have no problem letting it sit for a week, or even longer. However it has no electronics causing a parasitic battery drain.
 

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2020 XSE
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I have a 2020 XSE with less than 5000 miles and my battery has died 3x already. I'm going to be dropping it off for service and will have them check it out. I did notice it died after sitting for a few days and also when leaving the key in close proximity. Other than the battery issue the car has been great.
 

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I have a 2020 XSE with less than 5000 miles and my battery has died 3x already. I did notice it died after sitting for a few days and also when leaving the key in close proximity.
I keep my keys and FOB's in my bedroom that is at the opposite end of the house from my garage. About as far away as possible, and still be under the same roof. So far my battery on my 2015 Jeep is still going after 5 years. My 2018 Toyota after 2. I've read that some of the newer high end Mercedes and BMW's with all the gadgets and wizardry can kill a battery in as little as 2 weeks if they're not started and run on a regular basis.
 

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I keep my keys and FOB's in my bedroom that is at the opposite end of the house from my garage. About as far away as possible, and still be under the same roof. So far my battery on my 2015 Jeep is still going after 5 years. My 2018 Toyota after 2. I've read that some of the newer high end Mercedes and BMW's with all the gadgets and wizardry can kill a battery in as little as 2 weeks if they're not started and run on a regular basis.
I have a 2017 Ford Explorer and have left the spare key in it (by mistake) for over a month with no issue. The Camry already has build up on the battery terminals. I leave it in the driveway or garage 50/50 so I'm not sure what's causing all this. Either way hopefully they replace the battery and see what happens afterwards. BTW this is stock with nothing plugged in.
 

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2019 Camry XSE 2.5L A25A-FKS
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Discussion Starter #19
For what it's worth, I try to never let my newer vehicles sit for longer than 48 hours without starting them. Followed by driving them up to full operating temperature. My older truck, (1991), is an exception. I have no problem letting it sit for a week, or even longer. However it has no electronics causing a parasitic battery drain.
I actually had my car sat for 1 month in the snow. When I came back from vacation, it started up with no hesitation in the cold snow. Wish I had checked the voltage back then.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I have a 2017 Ford Explorer and have left the spare key in it (by mistake) for over a month with no issue. The Camry already has build up on the battery terminals. I leave it in the driveway or garage 50/50 so I'm not sure what's causing all this. Either way hopefully they replace the battery and see what happens afterwards. BTW this is stock with nothing plugged in.
If you got no aftermarket add-ons that is connected to the battery. It should not have those green corrosion acid build up. When it leaks acid to the top of the battery's post, green corrosion occurs.
 
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