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Micky Blue
1996 Toyota Camry LE
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323 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 96 camry with a 5sfe engine... right now im running cheap crappy 5mm bosch ignition wires and some cheap autolite plugs that i realized now really suck...

i'm probably gonna buy an ngk 7mm wire set bcuz its really cheap... but i dunno what kinda plugs to get... i heard iridium is really good, but not iridium plated or platinum plated... is there any true iridium spark plugs out there?

and i heard the pointier it is, the more performance you get out of it, is that true?
 

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Run the OEM ignition wires. They are better than most aftermarket wires for the 5SFE, trust me.

Your engine has too many miles to consider iridium or even platinum. Denso and NGK make true iridium plugs, and I'm not sure I've ever heard of a plated iridium plug. The main benefit of iridium is extra long life (servicability), but the cost is conductivity at the tip. Copper plugs will provide the best spark for the best cost.

The long life iridiums last for over 120k miles on new engines, and around 60-90k on older engines. Plug fouling may occur on engines with considerable wear, so there's no point in using anything other than the stock traditional plug (nickel) or a copper replacement.

And, the finer the tip, the less voltage is required to create spark. It doesn't necessarily increase performance UNLESS you have a weak ignition system to begin with.
 

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I threw Denso Iridium IX's on my 95. 130-some thousand on the body. Engine is an unknown quantity, it may or may not be from Japan.
I love them.

On my 5SFE, and on a buddies 93 5SFE, there is a sticker on the timing cover that said something along the lines of- "This vehicle is equipped from the factory with a Platinum-tipped spark plug. Use equivalent plug- (insert NGK or Denso numbers)"
Anomolies?

Just make sure you don't have oil consumption issues, or bad fueling, as fouling out a set of plugs that are $9-$14 a piece (depending on where you get them) is kind of a sad experience. Run some BG44k through the tank, and some Sea-Foam through the intake before you change. Thats just good maintenance anyway.
BTW, my preferred method of injector cleaning is BG44k every 10-20k miles, and Sea-Foam whenever I feel like it. Kept my old 220k+ mile 3AC motor in my Tercel 4wd going very strong, kinda figure it'll work well here too.
 

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How hard can it be?
2006 Pontiac G6 GT
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2,614 Posts
Get stock NGK plugs & wires...don't upgrade to anything fancy. You'll wasting $$$.
Werd. You will never get an increase in horsepower by upgrading to the so called "better" plugs, unless yours are worn down and need to be replaced anyway. Trust me, I'm in an ignition systems class right now. :D
 

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96 Camry, 4cyl...Plug Gap, Dist Cap access?

Two questions...

1. What is the recommended plug gap for 96 4cyl Camry.

2. Hard to see second(bottom) screw holding Dist Cap. Must the air
cleaner box and intake mainifold plenum be removed ton access or is there a better way?


Appreciate the advice...
 

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2019 Toyota Corolla
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6 Posts
Run the OEM ignition wires. They are better than most aftermarket wires for the 5SFE, trust me.

Your engine has too many miles to consider iridium or even platinum. Denso and NGK make true iridium plugs, and I'm not sure I've ever heard of a plated iridium plug. The main benefit of iridium is extra long life (servicability), but the cost is conductivity at the tip. Copper plugs will provide the best spark for the best cost.

The long life iridiums last for over 120k miles on new engines, and around 60-90k on older engines. Plug fouling may occur on engines with considerable wear, so there's no point in using anything other than the stock traditional plug (nickel) or a copper replacement.

And, the finer the tip, the less voltage is required to create spark. It doesn't necessarily increase performance UNLESS you have a weak ignition system to begin with.
For more information please visit the website here: jeepequipment.com/best-spark-plugs-for-jeep-review/
It is hard to pull out a winner in the NGK vs Denso debate since both are iridium spark plugs and offer almost similar performance.

Denso plugs are installed on almost every automobile model manufactured in Japan. The iridium used in them has a superior hardness. The electrode’s diameter in these plugs shrinks more than an NGK. For this reason, Denso plugs won’t last longer than NGK units but they will be better at producing powerful sparks.
 
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