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I always referred to the maintenance guide on maintaining my cars. However the maintenance guide for our 2017 highlander says nothing about brake fluid flush.
From memory I recall this being something that is rarely needed. Why is there nothing in the maintenance guide regarding this?
When do you guys do it?
 

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You should bleed the line and replace the fluid at an interval that makes sense for the fluid type. Not only does the fluid get a bit contaminated it absorbs water over time. I change mine around 60k miles for all my cars. If I buy a used car I flush all the fluids, including the brake, to make a common set point.
 

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Toyota does not specify a change interval like most manufacturers. The major concern is that brake fluid attracts moisture which leads to corrosion in your brake hydraulic system. You can buy test strips that you can use to check for the presence of water in the fluid or just change it every 3-5 years. I do it myself, so the cost is minimal. I think most shops charge ~$90-100.
 

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イリジウム
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Brake fluid will absorb moisture from the air, and the corrosion inhibitors will get used up. I'd change it if the suv is a keeper.

I'd change the brake fluid every 2 years. I use a Low Moisture Activity fluid like Valvoline Synthetic DOT 3/4 brake fluid. You can find it at Advance Auto/Car Quest. It's regularly $7.99 for a quart, on sale sometimes for $5.99. Or use their 20-25% off code on the home page on the regular price.

If you work on brakes and need a grease, use only JIS K2228 approved ones like CRC Silaramic. Petroleum based ones like Permatex green or purple will degrade the rubber and cause the anchor pins to gradually seize.
 

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I flush the brake fluid every two years on all my vehicles. It's easy with a brake bleeder, no need for a second person to pump the brakes.
 
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I flush the brake fluid every two years on all my vehicles. It's easy with a brake bleeder, no need for a second person to pump the brakes.
Supra, What method did you use? Did you use the Toyota (or generic diagnostic) software to activate the abs system to fully bleed the brakes?

I also have a 2019 Highlander and when I used my vacuum bleeder, I could only get a few tablespoons of fluid out before the flow stopped.
 

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Use a pressure bleeder or speedbleeders. I prefer the 2-person method. Checkvalve bleeder hoses and speedbleeders work well enough if you have no friends/family that can follow directions.

Some vacuum bleeders don't have enough vacuum, or are just too slow.

I don't bother activating the abs.... since I bleed every couple years. Even with a thorough bleed, you don't get all the old BF out of the system. Unless you get air, don't worry about it.

The time to cycle the abs is when you get air in the system, master cylinder replacement, brake hose breaks, ......

Hybrids have their own methods and FSM needs to be referenced.

One of my cars requires 2 year bleeds..... part of the 2 year free maintenance... But, they just issued a bulletin that the interval is 3 years.... because they won't have to pay for it. The lack of maintenance is market driven.
 
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I have owned a lot of cars, put plenty of miles on each of them,(most over 200000) and have never changed the fluid nor ever had brake issues. I guess I have just been lucky.
Same as you, keep my cars a long time and never changed the fluid. I also make a point of never opening the cap or adding fluid..I think keeping everything closed helps.
 

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Any problem with not changing your brake-fluid usually don't show up for hundreds of thousands of miles. But by then it's too late.

The average new car buyer rarely keeps their vehicle past 150k miles. So why mention any PM procedure that isn't going to affect the original owner.

Since we tend to keep our vehicles past 300k miles....I change the fluid about every 50k miles. Brake fluid is hygroscopic...and contrary to what many people believe....the brake system is NOT completely sealed. Moist air gets in and the water will be absorbed.
 

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Supra, What method did you use? Did you use the Toyota (or generic diagnostic) software to activate the abs system to fully bleed the brakes?

I also have a 2019 Highlander and when I used my vacuum bleeder, I could only get a few tablespoons of fluid out before the flow stopped.
Tomcoul, just doing the conventional bleeding procedures on my vehicles. I've never done ABS bleed. I heard you don't need to unless you replaced the master cylinder or can't completely bleed the system. I've got 16k on my Highlander and haven't done it yet so I'll find out next year when I bleed the brakes. It's interesting that you only got some fluid out, how much pressure(psi) did you apply to the vacuum bleeder?
312755

This is my DIY Home Depot sprayer brake bleeder with a Toyota cap. I also added a pressure gauge so I don't apply too much pressure.
 

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Like the worm-gear clamp on the cap idea! (But still don't over pressurized that!)
 

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Nice setup! I wish I had thought of making that instead of buying an identical product made by Motive Power called the Power Pressure Bleeder. My universal kit cost around $200 CAD. What’s nice is that it has a few different brake reservoir caps to fit different brands of vehicles.

To answer your question, the instructions on the Pressure Bleeder say to pump it up to 15 PSI and do not exceed 20 PSI.

Cheers!

Tomcoul, just doing the conventional bleeding procedures on my vehicles. I've never done ABS bleed. I heard you don't need to unless you replaced the master cylinder or can't completely bleed the system. I've got 16k on my Highlander and haven't done it yet so I'll find out next year when I bleed the brakes. It's interesting that you only got some fluid out, how much pressure(psi) did you apply to the vacuum bleeder?
View attachment 312755
This is my DIY Home Depot sprayer brake bleeder with a Toyota cap. I also added a pressure gauge so I don't apply too much pressure.
 

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I have a Motive power bleeder with Toyota Cap Adapter which sucks by the way. I had the Motive pressure bleeder because I live in what was the Car Capitol of World for a long time. It worked great on all the GM vehicle's the wife owned that needed freq. break line repairs. I always did the 2 man Up/Down routine on the rare occasions I needed to bleed a Toyota. Recently though waiting for my wife to get home was a pain.

The motive Toyota solution was not designed by an engineer I assure you. It is a flat cap with rubber cone shaped piece and then J bolts wing nuts and chains to go around the master cylinder.

Just like Toyota's terrible cup holders their caps for the brake master are not the best! Likewise the non-ABS brake master is not a great design right out of warranty mine went bad and it has gone through 3 after market ones. I will also say that my 2003 is not at all easy to bleed and actually get all the air out of and since it shares the res with the clutch master cylinder as well if you get any air from either system in the system it is a night mare to get it bleed properly. You have to go back and forth about 3 times over on both systems because the air will migrate from one system to the other and you will be like a dog chasing his own tail!
 

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OEM's make money under selling maintenance. Due to fleet buyers and initial cost of ownership.

Dealerships make money by over recommending maintenance.

Owners manuals are like "For Dummies'" type of manual and is general the lowest possible denominator.

Gear Lube and ATF: First 10K of ownership change. After that every 2 years or 24K miles will maximize life. Do this and you will never need a flush.

Coolant: Drain 1 gallon out and refill with 1 gallon every year and you will never need a flush and you will maximize cooling system life and block life. You will never need a flush.

Air Filter: Every 1-2 years or 20K miles depending on environment.

PCV: every 3 years replace with new OEM unit.

Power Steering: Every year suck out the reservoir and refill with Redline Power Steering Fluid. Drive it around for 10 minutes and repeat. Do this and you will never need a flush!

Engine Oil: Change every 6 months with M1 0W40. Once a year put 6-8 ounces of Schaeffer's #131 in one of the oil changes from new. You will never need a flush.

Once a year put a bottle or two of Redline SI-1 Fuel Injector Cleaner through the car.

Every 50K miles or 3 years which ever comes first fill and bleed brakes if you know how and can do it your self. If not wait for something to fail and then have your Tech or Brake shop do it.

If you have drum brakes every year adjust brakes.

Rotate tires every oil change.

Every time you get fuel pop hood and check oil and all other fluids that are you are able to easily check under hood.

Every oil change any lube points that you can lube lube.

Fuel Filter: Every 5 years or 150K miles if you have a fuel filter that is in tank and part of the fuel sender assembly change it and fuel pump Denso only! If it is not in tank change every 20K miles.

Every 60K miles or if worn change drive/serpentine belt every 120K change tensioner and idler pulley.

Do these things and few things will sneak up on you and leave you stranded or leave with $1500+ repair bills!

On the other if you are only going to keep the car 3-5 years and your a cheap you know what why bother changing the oil!
 

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Brake fluid will absorb moisture from the air, and the corrosion inhibitors will get used up. I'd change it if the suv is a keeper.

I'd change the brake fluid every 2 years. I use a Low Moisture Activity fluid like Valvoline Synthetic DOT 3/4 brake fluid. You can find it at Advance Auto/Car Quest. It's regularly $7.99 for a quart, on sale sometimes for $5.99. Or use their 20-25% off code on the home page on the regular price.

If you work on brakes and need a grease, use only JIS K2228 approved ones like CRC Silaramic. Petroleum based ones like Permatex green or purple will degrade the rubber and cause the anchor pins to gradually seize.
Or... use OEM fluids...
you forgot to mention about NOT using that silver Anti Seize crap...

Oh and I charge 50 for a BG Brake system flush. Pulls old fluid out through caliper bleeders by forcing new fluid through master cylinder at a continuous rate.
 

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Brake fluid will absorb moisture from the air, and the corrosion inhibitors will get used up. I'd change it if the suv is a keeper.

I'd change the brake fluid every 2 years. I use a Low Moisture Activity fluid like Valvoline Synthetic DOT 3/4 brake fluid. You can find it at Advance Auto/Car Quest. It's regularly $7.99 for a quart, on sale sometimes for $5.99. Or use their 20-25% off code on the home page on the regular price.

If you work on brakes and need a grease, use only JIS K2228 approved ones like CRC Silaramic. Petroleum based ones like Permatex green or purple will degrade the rubber and cause the anchor pins to gradually seize.
While synthetic fluid "sounds" better, it doesn't absorb moisture, leaving bubbles of water. Water rusts brakes more than dot34 hydroscopic fluid would. I think std fluid change every 4 years or anytime brake pads replaced, juzcuz. Use synthetic for high temp brakes.
 

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All DOT 3/4/5.1 fluids are synthetic and absorb moisture.
 
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