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Ok...not quite clear but,

if an amp can be bridged at 4ohms (which is most common for two channel amps); it can be bridged at 8ohms safely, but would not be safe at 2ohms bridged.

You will not get the full power at 8ohms bridged, but you will overheat the amp or worse at 2ohms bridged.

Is that what you need?
 

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Highlander
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Bridging two channels to one does NOT alter the impedance of the amp, it alters the power output. The speakers' nominal impedance determines that.
 

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I get angry when Im sober
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don't bridge at 2 ohms since your amp most likely isnt stable.
 

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You didn't help by clarifying your question.

I think you're basically asking if you can safely present an 8ohm bridged load to a 4ohm brigable amp. Yes.

And Luc's statement is correct also. But I don't think it answered your question.
 

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Highlander
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You're asking a scenerio which the amp has no control over to determine the load impedance, which is determined by the speakers themselves. If you had any circuit analysis background, you'd find out the question is moot.

Can a bridged amp at 4-ohm run an 8-ohm load? Yes. Can a bridged amp at 4-ohm run a 2-ohm load? Ideally yes, stably, no.
 

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Basically your amp can handle a speaker load that is above 4 ohms, anything lower you'll fry your amp. In some cases there are amps out there that can handle a 3 ohm load (ie Arc Audio, US amps) but the mainstream amps normally can't. Make sure you select sub or subs that give you the end result of 4 ohms.
 
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