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Super Moderator
1995 T100 2WD & 1993 MR2
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No idea but I know they've mentioned that on the forum more times than not.
Mine were on a new truck and all freeway miles.
Had the alignment done when I got my new set of BFG's and the guy said it was on spec and good to go.
Did notice that the Rt Front had worn down to the steel core, they'd been rotated 3 times before i had enough and off they came.
Soft compound, sticks and rides well but doesn't last.
 

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Token Aussie
1998 AE102 sedan, 2006 ZZE122 wagon, 2018 ZRE182 hatch
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3,150 Posts
I never get why people ask "is this brand of tyre good?" when within that there are dozens of different models with many different characteristics. All the big names will have a near semi-slick dry-weather road tyre that could detach your retinas in the corners but wear out faster than a pencil eraser, and at the same time have a black chunk of stone that are basically only good for keeping the chassis off the ground but will outlast western civilisation. Whilst yes there may be some brand-specific characteristics that could carry across between models (say Bridgestones tend to be softer, or Michelins have noisier tread patterns, or Toyos crack faster than usual in hot conditions), the actual design of the specific model of tyre will have a much greater bearing on the performance than the name on the sign out the front.

It would be like wanting to buy a new car, walking in to a dealership and just saying "I want a Toyota please" and then complaining that the Corolla they sold you is crap, because you've heard that Toyotas are good off-road (due to the reputation of the Landcruiser)
 

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Token Aussie
1998 AE102 sedan, 2006 ZZE122 wagon, 2018 ZRE182 hatch
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3,150 Posts
Have you ever had Bridgestone tires before. If so how were they. Did you get the stated mileage out of them or they fell short. Just asking. Thanks
Yes I have had Bridgestone tyres before, several different models in fact. However, I have never bought tyres (and they are basically never advertised here in this manner) on a "stated mileage" - they have a treadwear indicator on the sidewall which gives me an idea as to how quickly they will wear but the actual life will be heavily dependent on the driving style.

I've also had Michelins, Yokohamas, Kumhos as well as one or two cheaper brands put on mainly to pass rego on the daily. I'm not going to recommend any of them to you because a) I don't know what kind of tyre you want, b) I don't know what kind of car you drive, or how you drive it, and c) I live on the other side of the world, where tyre models and brands are most likely completely different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hiro I can appreciate that. Why do Bridgestone tire wear so fast. I don’t get it. No one I know of ever gets the stated mileage out of a set of Bridgestones. They always fall short. Why.

Hiro. Thanks for the reply
 

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Why do Bridgestone tire wear so fast. I don’t get it.
It's not a matter of brand but models. Any manufacturer have tires models that last more or less than others. Categories (summer, all season, all weather, winter ice, winter snow) will also perform differently. As far as mileage rating, it's like mpg rating. Your results will vary. So the first step would be to determine what type/category of tires you need for your type of driving and what different brands offer specifically for that kind of usage. It would then be easier and more pertinent to compare than just going by a brand that produce an awful variety of tires.
 

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Token Aussie
1998 AE102 sedan, 2006 ZZE122 wagon, 2018 ZRE182 hatch
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3,150 Posts
Hiro protagonists. What game is that from. It sounds familiar
The term "protagonist" is used to describe the main player character in a story (books, plays, games, movies etc). However, my specific reference is the name of the main character from a famous cyber-punk book called Snow Crash - his name is Hiro Protagonist, the joke being that his first name (a common Japanese name, in this case shortened from Hiroaki) is a homophone for the English word "hero" and he is literally the hero and the protagonist of the story.
 

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Token Aussie
1998 AE102 sedan, 2006 ZZE122 wagon, 2018 ZRE182 hatch
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3,150 Posts

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Jolly. What tires do you have in Canada weather.
Had some over the years on different cars… Rather conservative driving style. Also user of winter tires as all-seasons may be somewhat ok in snow but considerably lose grip in any conditions including dry as temperature get below freezing point.

Past «all-seasons» (some from original equipment on car, so may be slightly different than same model in aftermarket)
  • Firestone (Bridgestone) Affinity: OK on dry, poor on anything else. Longevity itself was OK but they lost their quietness after just a few thousand miles. Couldn’t wait to replace them;
  • Goodyear (forgot the model): OK traction in all conditions, nothing special, good longevity;
  • Hankook Optimo H725: OK comfort/noise/longevity but only average traction on dry, poor on wet, even poorer in snow;
  • Hankook Optimo H426: Good comfort/noise/longevity, slightly better traction than H725
  • Motomaster (Canadian Tire store brand made by Cooper) AW: Good comfort/noise/longevity. Good traction in most conditions;
  • Toyo Extensa: Excellent traction in all conditions and longevity but not the quietest.
Past «winter»
  • Michelin X-Ice (winter): Excellent traction/noise/longevity except… it’s an ice oriented winter tire so they weren’t that good (I’d even say poor) on snow;
  • Semperit (Continental sub-brand) Speed Grip (winter): Good traction/noise/longevity except… it’s a snow oriented winter tire so they weren’t that good on ice;
  • Toyo Observe GSi5 (winter): Excellent traction on snow, ice, slush, good on dry but not the quietest. Longevity itself was good but actual snow/ice efficiency declined fast after ±25K.
Currently on Corolla
  • General (Continental sub-brand) Altimax RT43 [all-seasons]: So far the best for price among what I’ve owned. Very good traction and hydroplaning resistance, quiet and comfortable. Too soon to evaluate longevity but still look great after ±10K.
  • Gislaved (Continental sub brand) NordFrost 200 [winter]: Satisfied with the all-seasons General, I was looking for their winter counterpart Altimax Artic 12 (also sold as Gislaved NordFrost 100) but they weren’t available. So I went for the Gislaved 200. Excellent in snow, good on ice (mine are the non-studded version), quiet for a winter tire but rather firms on dry.
So my experience has taught me that sub brands (like General and Gislaved from Continental) often have interesting offering. They generally are older models from the mother company, so not the latest technology but one that was on top a few years ago, now at a lower price.
 

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Administrator
マズダスピード3
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17,371 Posts
Don’t overthink the brand. Go out on a limb and buy a set you think will be for your environment. That’s truly the best way to find out. This has worked for me.
 
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