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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm considering changing the plugs and perhaps the ignition wires on my 98 with 98,000 miles. Originals are in there and I notice no problems or loss of power, startability or fuel economy. Is it wise to make the change? If so, what can I expect from a reliable and honest dealer for costs? I'm also thinking of doing it myself but I have no access to compressed air to blow out debris before removing the plugs. How do you reach the plugs...with socket extensions? I would use the factory spec'd plugs. What wires would you recommend, equivalent to originals. I'm not looking for super wires here. What do you think my costs would be if I do the job?

Thanks in advance.
 

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You did not specify what engine.

On my Camry, I bought four Denso plugs for ~$28 at AutoZone and NGK wireset for ~$35 shipped from http://www.sparkplugs.com .

To get to the plugs, you need a 13/16 spark plug socket, a 6 or 9 in extension, I forget which, and a ratchet to drive it.

The V6 is a little more difficult from what I hear because the intake is in the way for the rear bank. It will also cost more because of more plugs
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sorry...it's a 4. Any info on dealer price?
 

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Getting it done at the dealer or buying the parts from there?

My guess is $150 to $200 -- Parts + 1 hour labor :dunno:
 

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Moving Forward
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you can buy compressed air anywhere ina can if you want to. You probably have some around your office for cleaning compters stuff. buy the parts from the dealer and do it yourself. They will charge you at least an hour labor and it will take all of 15 minutes to do it. they will wait in line to get the parts longer than they will spend on your car.

You need a 3/8 ratchet, spark plug socket and an extension or two. Actually I think you can do them with a 6in extension.

Should be abel to have it done in less than half an hour.
 

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That One Guy...
2001 Camry XLE
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922 Posts
4 cycle engines are easy to change the spark plugs.. well most anyways.. and this engine should be no exception.. should only take about 20-30 minsute.. and thats taking your time..
 

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Banned
Camry / 2WD Pickup
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601 Posts
touringcamry said:
You did not specify what engine.

On my Camry, I bought four Denso plugs for ~$28 at AutoZone and NGK wireset for ~$35 shipped from http://www.sparkplugs.com .

To get to the plugs, you need a 13/16 spark plug socket, a 6 or 9 in extension, I forget which, and a ratchet to drive it.

The V6 is a little more difficult from what I hear because the intake is in the way for the rear bank. It will also cost more because of more plugs
I have a '99 I-4 and I'm pretty sure that I've used a 5/8" spark plug socket to get the plugs out, IIRC.
 

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slugmmco
maryland
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Just changed my plugs on a 98 camry xle 4cyl for the first time 104,000 miles. Relatively easy since they sit on top of the motor by where you add oil. Check your owner's manual for spark plug replacement (mine said use only the Denso platinum split plugs). However, I bought the Denso iridium plugs from Auto Zone at $12.99 per plug and Duarlast wire set from same store for $49.99. Car runs fine with these plugs. Just make sure they're the same length. Extension for the spark plug socket is required.
 

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Camry Baka
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just go to auto zone or advance autoparts tell them what kind of car you have and that you want spark plugs(i prefer iriduim plugs either denso or ngk), and they'll get you the right ones. You might also want anti seize, and a dust blower, which is like a can that's use to blow dust out of a pc. Then you need a wrench set and extensions. It took me a while to get out the spark plugs cause they wouldn't stay on my rachet, so i cut a finger off a glove and got it out ^_^. the wire set your probably better off ordering them online.

-probably 40-50 bucks for spark plugs iriduim ^^
-can of dust blower ~5-10
-extension for your rachet ~10-20 i think unless u can borrow one
-wire set ~35-50
-anti seize .50 (optional)
-wrench set ~err...hope you have one or can borrow one
-rubber or latex glove (optional, if you had the same problem as me) .00 ~i vote jack it
-knowing that you did it yourself ~priceless :D

besides that it's less then paying the dealership or a mechanic to do it, and GOOD LUCK :thumbup:
 

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Just to add my two cents, I have a '98 I4 with 235,000km on her. When I pulled the rubber boot off the plugs I looked down there to find it spotlessly clean, so those square shapeded covers really keeps all the dirt and grease etc out. You'll probably find that there's no need for compressed air to clean around the plugs.
 

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I dont know if its true or not, the guy at AutoZone told me if I bought platinium plugs I wouldnt have to gap them is this true? I have a 5SFE, I4

Thanks
 

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AFAIK, Denso and NGK plugs come pre-gapped from the factory. If you want you can get some feeler gauges and check them to ensure they were not damaged in transit. However, with the plastic tube over them they should be ok.
 

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Changing Spark Plugs is Easy on the 4 Cylinder Engine

John5516 said:
I dont know if its true or not, the guy at AutoZone told me if I bought platinium plugs I wouldnt have to gap them is this true? I have a 5SFE, I4

Thanks
If they come with a cardboard tube over the threads you dont have to gap them. If you buy a japanese brand you can trust the gap, if you buy champion, bosch or autolite id check the gap for sure.

You can just use gas station air to blow out from around your plugs and then just drive it home, let engine cool and change the plugs yourself. Its very easy on the 4 like every one is saying. DO use anti sieze on the spark plug threads, beccause just wait til 60,000 miles from now when you have to change them again, and they come out easy instead of being rusted and seized in place. Spend a couple bucks for the little packet at the auto parts counter. Also pick up some high-temp electrical grease, that will be available in another packet. You will want to use the di-electrical grease on: spark plug wire connector, inside the boot, where the connector meets the plug. Also use some of this grease if you change the distributor cap - put it inside the cap towers where the other end of the wire goes into the cap.

If you've never changed the plug wires on this car, its a good idea to do it like you are saying. Also if you cant remember when the last time you changed the distributor cap and rotor is, change that too. I think if you looked inside the cap now you will see burned and pitted contacts and worn rotor tip, so its probably time to change it.
If you want to try to change your wires and cap yourself, you can easily do it, but you have to make dead sure that all the wires go back where they are supposed to. Take notes, mark the distributor caps with some white out for alignment to the front so you dont put it on wrong. Test fit the new cap and align it exactly as the old one is. And mark all the plug wires from front of engine to back, i use masking tape on the wires. Also and more important, mark their place on the cap, before you pop any wires loose - they must go back on the exact way they came off, of course. And dont forget the di-electric grease if you have it now.
 
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