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WHO REPLACED THE TRACTION BATTERY?????
Why do you have to go through all this bs?
Or, you simply keep driving as is? Because of the high replacement cost?
How good or BAD is your 12V battery? Is it OEM Panasonic? Dying 12V battery is known to throw all kinds of codes.
Why in the world are you removing battery terminal? That's another problem to come.
Simply pull ECM fuse overnight.
If battery logo turns GREEN you ARE at full charge. It will not turn green otherwise. The little black empty space above it is fine.
 

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My 12V battery was tested and found to be good.

I simply unplug the 12V battery to reset the code. What problem could I be creating by doing that? it appears to be the OEM Panasonic battery. I bought the car with 108K miles to find out 6K miles later, the battery pack has issues.

Another question I have is, if the battery pack has issues would it show to be full at times on the screen?

Thanks for your input
 

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OK.... First of all, your going about this all wrong. Use the search function and do some research! It's funny about these first post panic displays.

Do you have the report from the dealer that checked it out? What did it say? They have the ability to test the traction battery and identify problems with individual cells. They should be able to tell you based on their test EXACTLY what is wrong with the battery and where.

You need to have the codes read in detail, have them identified and then if the problem(s) point to the traction battery, it needs to be tested to determine the problem(s). Do you follow?

If you are unable or unwilling to deal with the dealer again, get on craigslist and you can find a local mobile technician that will come out and fix the battery in your front yard for under $1000. Maybe as little as $600 or less depending on how far they have to drive and what they have to do. The same tech can install a brand new battery from Toyota for under $3000 if you really want to do that.

Or you could just do it all yourself. Again... Use the search function and do some research.

Florida heat has nothing to do with it, so you can quit blaming anything on that.
 

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Please, pull ECM fuse instead? Those cars do NOT like 12V to be simply disconnected. Esp the way you do it - every so often. It is much easier to pull the fuse anyway.

Next. HOW was battery checked? The 12V? I am stuck on this because it is 10 yo battery and it would have been a miracle for it to still be at its full function.
This is why I am asking - how was it tested? With voltmeter? Even a load test? At parts store? Same dealership? Most have no idea it's a deep cycle battery and it can NOT be tested conventional way.

Think I'm pulling your leg?

There are six simple steps in testing a deep cycle battery-inspect, recharge, remove surface charge, measure the state-of-charge, load test, and recharge.

http://www.pacificpowerbatteries.com/aboutbatts/deep cycle battery faq/dcfaq3.html
 

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I have not pulled the ECM fuse since I'm out of town and do not want to be stranded. I plan on doing it this weekend while I'm home. I will report on how the car behaves.

To tell you the truth, I don't know whether this is the original battery or not. I can tell it's a Panasonic battery. Like I said previously I bought the car with 108K miles, it now has over 150K miles. The battery was tested at an Advance Auto Parts the conventional way. Perhaps I will have it tested at Toyota during my next service.

Back in Feb 2016, Toyota did not really give me any report for the diagnostic with exception of telling the battery pack needs to be replaced. The receipt attached does not contain any code. I called them two months later to ask them what was the code and that's when they told me PA080 over the phone. I don't know if I can believe this is the right code at this point. I've already paid to have it diagnosed.

I have attached pictures of the messages appeared on the dashboard along with the battery max level I've often seen it. If a few modules are defective at this point, can the car possibly show a full charged battery?
 

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I DOUBT OEM Panasonic battery was replaced at such short mileage as 108 000. Those are real good batteries. I replaced mine just for kicks and it stills serves as gate opener battery. Manufactured in 2006, ten years, still working.
I think by now you agree that it takes a bit more than conventional methods to test deep cycle battery.
Ok, here's the thing. By no means am I saying dealer is lying to you (though they are known to do that) and traction abttery is good and so on. It is quite possible it is bad. Or, maybe simply cell busses need to be cleaned, as some here did successfully.
What I am saying, it is always worth to start with plausible least expensive solution - that being 12V battery KNOWN to throw VSC and Check Hybrid System lights.
That's what I'm saying.
 

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I disconnected two fuses 2 separate times since I wasn't sure which one to remove. The diagram is attached. I placed them back to their original positions at least 1 hour after I removed them. I left the car idle for five minutes, but there's no difference. I have yet to get the 12 V battery retested properly. I will report once it's done. Thanks for your input.
 

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UPDATE:

I have load tested the 12 V battery and pulled #14 fuse as suggested. The battery is fine, but the code still came back on. I have continuously been disconnecting the 12 V battery to reset the code (check hybrid system). Last week, I took the car to my mechanic who decided to diagnose it with his machine (not for hybrid). I must say the code was off when he ran the diagnostic. The code came back with "Body Control System" P Signal (DTC: B2281). We have both looked up what the code means and it seems to infer that

"The power source control ECU and the transmission control ECU are connected by a cable and BEAN. If the cable information and BEAN information are inconsistent, this DTC will be output."

1. What does BEAN stand for?

I also noticed two different gas mileage averages from the dashboard display and the GPS screen. See attached photo

2. Could that be the issue all along?

3. If this is truly a hybrid battery isssue, what kind of symptoms should I be observing at this point? When the "Check Hybrid System" is on, the engine never shuts off. It runs continously, but when when I reset it, car runs fine again.

4. Why does the "Check VSC" message always come on with the "Check Hybrid System"? After a day, the check VSC code dissapears on its own.

5. Could there a bad sensor that's triggering the hybrid system as well?

Please help
 

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For now, I can answer the mpg question. You looking at Tank Average in dash and, if you do not manually reset it after every refuel, Long Term average on Nav. They WILL be different.
I'd greatly suggest Techstrema software for TCH. Hope this is what your tech used.
I'll see what I can dig out on that DTC in my Alldata account.
Check VSC and Check Hybrid are sort of spook you codes that come up with many kinds of "concerns" ECUs have.
 

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2AZ-FXE STARTING: SMART KEY SYSTEM: B2281: "P" Signal Malfunction

DTC B2281 - "P" Signal Malfunction

DESCRIPTION

The HV control ECU and the shift lock control ECU are connected by a cable and the CAN. If the cable information and CAN information are inconsistent, this DTC will be output.

HINT: After the main body ECU is replaced, perform the registration procedures for the engine immobiliser system See: Accessories and Optional Equipment\Antitheft and Alarm Systems\Testing and Inspection\Programming and Relearning\Engine Immobiliser System\Registration.




NSPECTION PROCEDURE

PROCEDURE


  1. READ VALUE USING INTELLIGENT TESTER
(a) Connect the intelligent tester to the DLC3. (b) Turn the power switch on (IG) and turn the intelligent tester main switch on. (c) Read the DATA LIST according to the displays on the tester. MAIN BODY:






OK:
"ON" (P signal is ON) and "OFF" (P signal is OFF) appear on the screen.

HINT: If the result is not as specified, there may be a malfunction with the shift lock control ECU See: Steering and Suspension\Steering\Steering Column\Service and Repair\Removal and Replacement\Components.

NG -- CHECK WIRE HARNESS (MAIN BODY ECU - SHIFT LOCK CONTROL ECU)
OK -- GO TO SHIFT LOCK CONTROL SWITCH

  1. CHECK WIRE HARNESS (MAIN BODY ECU - SHIFT LOCK CONTROL ECU)
(a) Disconnect the E9 and E57 ECU connectors.




(b) Measure the resistance according to the value(s) in the table below. Standard resistance:






NG -- REPAIR OR REPLACE HARNESS OR CONNECTOR
OK -- Continue to next step.

  1. CHECK MAIN BODY ECU OPERATION
(a) After replacing the main body ECU with a normally functioning ECU, check the power source mode change.
(1) When the key is inside the vehicle, the brake pedal is depressed and the shift lever is in P, check that pressing the power switch causes the power source mode to change to on (READY).
OK:

Power switch on (READY).
HINT: If power mode does not change to ON (READY) See: Starting and Charging\Starting System\Testing and Inspection\Symptom Related Diagnostic Procedures\Starting - Smart Key System\Power Source Mode Does Not Change To ON (Ready).

NG -- GO TO OTHER PROBLEM
OK -- END (MAIN BODY ECU DEFECTIVE)
 

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2007 Camry Hybrid battery failure- which one first?

So embarrassing to start 1st post by admitting I never knew my CH had 2 batteries. 3 weeks ago after 4 days in garage it would not start with messages Check Hybrid System & VSC. Towed to dealer who called same day to say I needed a new HV battery at $4K+. I was surprised, since car had shown none of the telltale signs of impending HV failure service adviser asked about (lower gas mileage, slow acceleration, warning lights). I said story reminded me of how 1st sign of failure in 12V batteries in my non-hybrids would be slow/no start after a period of non-use. He said HV battery doesn't show up that way, but never mentioned a 12V battery. It was exactly 30 days after my 10 yr warranty expired. Since I bought 3 Toyotas from this dealer, never used 7yr/84k extended warranty on my CH now with only 86K miles, and religiously followed 10 yrs of recommended dealer service, I asked if Toyota & dealer could show some love on the barely expired warranty. Started a case with "Toyota Experience Center" but 2.5 wks later no call backs despite numerous messages re: claim progress. I finally get a take-it-or-leave offer leaving me with a substantial balance on a rebuilt HVB, which I reluctantly accept. Search on this site & others indicates problem may have been primarily with 12V battery which has never been replaced. I asked for Toyota Info System readout today showing every single one of battery blocks tests weak- but no mention of 12V status. I would appreciate help on these questions:
1. Could whole sequence/messages have resulted from failing 12V that should have been identified at present service, not a failed HVB needing replacement?
2. Could/should the 10 years of "Battery Performance Tests (passed)" done at regular services have detected a 12V or HVB failure earlier and prevented this situation?
3. Is sudden total HVB failure with no preceding signs likely? Or 12V issue more likely?
4. Any suggestions on a reputable independent (of Toyota) place to check and document 12V status? How about The Hybrid Shop, a national company with a local dealer?
Any other suggestions on where to go from here with 12V replacement & out-of warranty claim would be a big help. Thanks for listening!:frown:
 

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Main question - are you in CARB state? Then battery is under 150 000 miles - but yes, I see, 10 yr expired..
I am no expert on how traction battery is tested, but for the year, 12 V is MOST likely bad. Traction battery does not really goes dead like they described it.... Usually cells go weak one at a time, battery starts "coughing" so to speak.
You can, for the sake of urgency, replace 12V with any same size/configuration battery. ANY. If this revives traction battery, then you saved a lot of money and can look into replacement with AGM battery later. I'd even simply go to junk yard and grab one there. Right now, you are salvaging the $4K expense.
But if traction battery is dead, it will still have to be charged by dealer. Dead as in discharged. They may refuse to charge it claiming it being inoperational. So it's a bit of muscle work, you know. And gamble. My gut tells me traction abttery is simply discharged and they want to pull quicky on you.
 

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thanks for speedy & useful replies. Short answers: I am in California. Dealer installed rebuilt battery today after I agreed to high-pressure offer and not checking (this) forum first. Tomorrow I will pick it up and immediately go to independent shop that specializes in Toyota hybrid battery issues. If load test shows 12V is bad, then I am not sure how to proceed with claim that HVB may only have been discharged, not failed. Have you or anyone else heard a similar story where dealer (may have) ignored 12V failure and never tried to recharge a fully discharged HVB? Iwill update tomorrow with results. BTW, local shop says OEM 12V replacement is $3-$400. He says a used OEM is much cheaper & very good. Thanks again.
 

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I came across new battery replacement by dealer (12V) at $256 in Highlander Hybrid forum. That IS rather good price.
We normally use Yellow Top Optima as replacement, it's somewhere around $200. Any suitable AGM deep cycle battery should work too. There are now ones made by Energizer that fit the bill and are less costly than Optima.

I am a bit crossing my competence, but I believe that technician has to get to the battery itself - hybrid one - and physically test each cell for failure. Once again, my opinion is that "weak" cells simply show low charge in them and out of as many of them as there are in hybrid battery, chances of ALL of them go bad are miniscule.
I feel they simply pulled a quicky on you. Of course, in good old traditions, you requested old battery back into your possession? As, technically, it can be tested for failure, not low charge, and then you may have grounds to claim with dealer.
See, thing is, replacing battery is profitable shortcut.
Btw, 12V is deep cycle battery and can be tested only with special procedure. Basic load test is not suitable for it. But if voltage on it is below 11.7V, it is considered inoperable. That simple.
 

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OP- what was the charge for the rebuilt battery\labor and what is the warranty period for the rebuilt?
Maybe not such a bad deal considering the battery was 10 years old and they picked up some of the cost.
 

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The story takes a better though still confusing direction. Toyota and dealer came up with better offer: $1217 and no tax. I feel OK with that, more than I wanted to pay but ended up with a HVB replacement that adds life & value to this 10 yr old car. Could have pushed for more maybe, but as has been said, sometimes the enemy of good is better. Advisor says 12V is ok-the "test battery performance" part of every service scan tests the 12V ONLY-& NOT the HVB. The code stored in ECU called for replacing HV battery pack he said. No explanation as to why all blocks tested low/weak yet no preceding signs. He also says the 12V is essential to starting vehicle since it triggers the starter. I am not sure how to square that with the various opinions on this forum & others that 12V is only involved in electronics- may just be semantics. I asked if I could have/borrow the old HVB to see if it could be recharged. Predictable answer: no. So I took the car down to a local (non-dealer) hybrid specialist to get 12V tested with a load. It tested perfect. So I guess the theory that 12V failed first, and caused complete discharge of HVB doesn't hold up. The local guy says HVB replacement is lucrative for the dealers so they really don't try to recharge a "failed" HVB to see if it can be resuscitated. He did show me a way to save the HVB during periods when car parked for longer periods. He opened hatch on rt rear trunk and quickly removed an orange thingy (excuse the tech jargon) that connects the HVB. Easy off/on. Will try to make that a future practice.
Thanks to all for ideas and support. Will keep the good deal on 12V replacement in mind since someday it will fail. He suggested a trickle charger for 12V if letting car sit. Not sure what that would involve.
I am thinking it may be best time to sell this CH now, with new Toyota replaced/warrantied HVB, low miles, great condition. Should attract interest for a good price. I could use proceeds for a new(er) CH with a longer warranty. If any thoughts on this common dilemma (keep or sell) in my situation here would be appreciated. My faith in Toyota and the world, with the help of this forum, has been somewhat restored. Thanks again.
 
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