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Discussion Starter #1
So, I try to keep my car windows as clean as possible but always struggle with the areas that are hard to reach like the front and rear windshields. You know what I am talking about.... that light thin nasty film that develops over time. Probable from the glues and adhesives gassing out from the interior of the car.

While the best glass cleaners, I am talking ab out invisible glass or sprayaway that use high quality alcohol, that don't streak or leave behind residue work pretty well, sometimes they just like to smear the crap around and never can get the windshield completely clean on the inside.

I have found that using a steam cleaner like the ones that you use to remove wrinkles in shirts actually work 100% of the time. In my case, I picked up a larger steamer to use for other things and the windows were an after thought, but now, it is the only way I clean the windows and the front and rear windshields that are a pain the the @** on the inside clean all the time 100% nothing left on them at all.
 

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Be aware that the heat from the steam might soften or loosen the adhesives which hold down the glass to the car body.
I don't know that to be a fact, but it is something which occurred to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Be aware that the heat from the steam might soften or loosen the adhesives which hold down the glass to the car body.
I don't know that to be a fact, but it is something which occurred to me.
That is an interesting thought..... Years ago when I had a windshield replaced, the guy brought some sort of electric caulking gun that heated up the adhesives that they use to bead the edge of the glass before setting it in place. I don't think the glass would stay hot long enough for it to loosen, but it is a possibility.
 

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As long as the rear glass defroster is embedded inside the glass (many are not) and you don't have an after-market tint film, it might OK to use steam. Otherwise I would not use it.
 

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As far as tools, a Swiffer Mob works very good. It swivels in multiple directions, the handle adjusts to 4 different lengths, has a unique cloth attachment method so that you can use Swiffer Dry Pads, a micro-fiber towel, or even a paper towel (the blue shop towels work best). Spay your favorite window clear on the cloth after attaching it to the mob.

I use the full handle length, and stand outside the car to clean the front and rear glass.

You wife or girlfriend probably has one, or get one for about $12.00 (with 10 sample pads).
 

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I don't know, maybe I'm just old school cheap. I use windex for spray, and crumpled up newspaper for wiping. It's been doing that job for me for over 30 years now just fine. Biggest expense is the windex, as the newspaper gets used AFTER I've read it.
 

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I don't know, maybe I'm just old school cheap. I use windex for spray, and crumpled up newspaper for wiping. It's been doing that job for me for over 30 years now just fine. Biggest expense is the windex, as the newspaper gets used AFTER I've read it.
Regular Windex with ammonia should not be used if the windows have an after-market tint film installed. Windex (and others) make special glass cleaners without ammonia if needed (available at auto supply stores, or the auto parts sections of discount stores).

Can you really reach the entire rear glass on the inside of the car with just your arms and old newspaper? Maybe on your 1992 Geo it is possible, but not on most of the newer sedans with severely raked rear glass.

Also, who reads newspapers printed on newsprint anymore, and how much does that cost?
 

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I've use a micro fiber towel attached to an adjustable arm and typically used Invisible Glass Cleaner to clean my front and rear windows if I need to. I will typically just never touch them if no one has ever touched them. I would do about... five wet and five dry passes and like another three more dry passes until the windows are as spotless as I can get them. Side windows I just do two wet and three dry passes.
 

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Regular Windex with ammonia should not be used if the windows have an after-market tint film installed. Windex (and others) make special glass cleaners without ammonia if needed (available at auto supply stores, or the auto parts sections of discount stores).

Can you really reach the entire rear glass on the inside of the car with just your arms and old newspaper? Maybe on your 1992 Geo it is possible, but not on most of the newer sedans with severely raked rear glass.

Also, who reads newspapers printed on newsprint anymore, and how much does that cost?
The lower corners on my wife's 2000 Accord are tough to reach, but then she barely keeps the inside of the windshield clean. I've hosed down the windshield many times over the years, because I have a hard time seeing out of it. It's also the newest car we own.
As far as Windex with ammonia being used with tinted windows, I don't have any tinted windows, unless they are factory tinted glass. This means regular Windex can be used.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I stopped using windex years ago. Even on un-tinted glass, I would not use it. But yeah, I started with one of those little triangle tools with the little microfiber cloths on it, and that got me into the corners which was great, but even with invisible glass or sprayaway glass cleaners, some of what ever the stuff is wanted to smear. The heat and steam breaks up the tension of what ever that stuff is and it wipes right off.

Back to the steamer breaking up the adhesive hold the glass on the car. I used the steamer to de badge the car also and while it worked really well, It took probable 20 minutes to do that. Heating the glass with the steam cleaner for a few minutes just to loosen the crud on it should not affect the adhesive holding the glass in place. I would have to hit the same spot for 20 minutes for the steam to have an affect on it.
 

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I stopped using windex years ago. Even on un-tinted glass, I would not use it. But yeah, I started with one of those little triangle tools with the little microfiber cloths on it, and that got me into the corners which was great, but even with invisible glass or sprayaway glass cleaners, some of what ever the stuff is wanted to smear. The heat and steam breaks up the tension of what ever that stuff is and it wipes right off.

Back to the steamer breaking up the adhesive hold the glass on the car. I used the steamer to de badge the car also and while it worked really well, It took probable 20 minutes to do that. Heating the glass with the steam cleaner for a few minutes just to loosen the crud on it should not affect the adhesive holding the glass in place. I would have to hit the same spot for 20 minutes for the steam to have an affect on it.
The key with the front and rear windows is to do A LOT of passes. I did like five or six wet and dry passes before the smudges and smears went away. Wet, dry, wet, dry, wet, dry, dry, etc.
 

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So, I try to keep my car windows as clean as possible but always struggle with the areas that are hard to reach like the front and rear windshields. You know what I am talking about.... that light thin nasty film that develops over time. Probable from the glues and adhesives gassing out from the interior of the car.

While the best glass cleaners, I am talking ab out invisible glass or sprayaway that use high quality alcohol, that don't streak or leave behind residue work pretty well, sometimes they just like to smear the crap around and never can get the windshield completely clean on the inside.

I have found that using a steam cleaner like the ones that you use to remove wrinkles in shirts actually work 100% of the time. In my case, I picked up a larger steamer to use for other things and the windows were an after thought, but now, it is the only way I clean the windows and the front and rear windshields that are a pain the the @** on the inside clean all the time 100% nothing left on them at all.
I've found the best method for getting rid of that oil-based film from interior outgassings is to use a 1:6 ratio of vinegar to water. Dampen a paper towel or two, wipe the inside of the window, and then remove the vinegar solution with a clean towel. If there's some slight smearing left behind, use another towel and very lightly wet it with distilled water to rub down the window. It'll end up spotless. Never use ammonia-based cleaners because it will only smear the oil-based film around, and also it will damage many types of tinting.
 

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I use a brush similar to what you see at the gas stations. Shaving cream cleans the glass and leaves a nice scent which can be used on house mirrors too, plus prevents glass fogging up during rain, bathroom showers ect.

 
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