Toyota Nation Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
2018 Tundra Limited
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I’m going to be replacing the Cold Start Temp Switch 89462-20030 and the instructions I can find online call for thread sealant. Any recommendations for a sensor/coolant safe thread sealer?

Thanks, Eugene
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
Do you have the Toyota Repair Manual? It will list a part number for the sealant, then you can search for an equivalent.

The coolant safe is more important than the sensor safe part because the electronics are sealed inside metal. Permatex probably has something that will work.
 

·
Registered
2018 Tundra Limited
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Do you have the Toyota Repair Manual? It will list a part number for the sealant, then you can search for an equivalent.

The coolant safe is more important than the sensor safe part because the electronics are sealed inside metal. Permatex probably has something that will work.
Unfortunately no manual.
 

·
Registered
2018 Tundra Limited
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
So, I got the new switch from Toyota and it has a copper crush washer. Does that mean no thread sealant is required? Is there a torque value or just “Good n Tight”? Sorry, it’s not my car. I’m just trying to help a friend out who is financially challenged.
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
I don't have my repair manual with me, so I can't look up torque values. I know the fan switch doesn't need sealant nor does the block drain plug. I'd just make it about as tight as the original, and check if the original had a washer. If it's going into aluminum be careful not to overtighten. Fill with coolant and check that it's not leaking and it should be fine. I don't think there's too much risk of it loosening by itself if it's not tight enough, it's just that it will leak/weep a very small smount of coolant. Check it again for leaking after a bit of driving if you can.
 

·
Registered
2018 Tundra Limited
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I don't have my repair manual with me, so I can't look up torque values. I know the fan switch doesn't need sealant nor does the block drain plug. I'd just make it about as tight as the original, and check if the original had a washer. If it's going into aluminum be careful not to overtighten. Fill with coolant and check that it's not leaking and it should be fine. I don't think there's too much risk of it loosening by itself if it's not tight enough, it's just that it will leak/weep a very small smount of coolant. Check it again for leaking after a bit of driving if you can.
Will do. Thanks. I’ve been using Toyota Red in her car. Do you think it would be safe to change it over to the Toyota Pink? That way she can get a jug of Zerex if she were to need it?
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
I'm not sure about the coolant types. You'd have to look up what is compatible. I've always used the regular Prestone green stuff in my 1990.
 

·
Registered
1992 Geo Prizm
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
I'm not sure about the coolant types. You'd have to look up what is compatible. I've always used the regular Prestone green stuff in my 1990.
Same here. I use the green stuff. Some of the newer red stuff has a tendency to plug heater core passages (why I don't use DexCool in my GM's).
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
DexCool isn't the same as Toyota Red or Pink. I know there have been a lot of problems with DexCool turning to gel if it's mixed with other coolants or maybe with too much air trapped in the system.
 

·
Registered
2018 Tundra Limited
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The car has been running Toyota red since 2006 with no issues. Not sure I would want to change it to green.
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
I don't think you should bother changing it. It shouldn't be losing coolant, so there shouldn't be a need to top it up frequently. If it is losing coolant then figure out why. There shouldn't be a need for her to buy a whole jug of coolant. If there is then there's some sort of big problem.

If it does lose a little coolant over time then distilled water can be used without affecting the coolant/water ratio too much. Even a lot of water can be used temporarily if it's not freezing outside. Or you could leave a small container of red coolant with her if she were to need it and she can safely store it.
 

·
Registered
2018 Tundra Limited
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I don't think you should bother changing it. It shouldn't be losing coolant, so there shouldn't be a need to top it up frequently. If it is losing coolant then figure out why. There shouldn't be a need for her to buy a whole jug of coolant. If there is then there's some sort of big problem.

If it does lose a little coolant over time then distilled water can be used without affecting the coolant/water ratio too much. Even a lot of water can be used temporarily if it's not freezing outside. Or you could leave a small container of red coolant with her if she were to need it and she can safely store it.
It hasn’t lost any but is due for a flush. It’s been about 3yrs since the last one.
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
All the common coolants use ethylene glycol. The only real difference between the colors is the corrosion inhibitors. Phosphates, silicates, etc. And some of those are not compatible with certain metals or seals used by various manufactures. Then there's the universally compatible coolants that say they can be mixed with anything.

From what I gather mixing stuff with DexCool caused problems. Now everyone is afraid to mix any different coolants together, but that fear may be overblow. I haven't heard any stories where mixing coolants other than DexCool caused major problems. (Of course now someone will probably post something to prove me wrong!)
 

·
Registered
1992 Geo Prizm
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
It hasn’t lost any but is due for a flush. It’s been about 3yrs since the last one.
Then you'll need to get a jug or 2 and flush it. As for the temperature fitting, most of those are pipe thread style, so as you tighten it, it kind of locks itself in place. Most sensors are brass, which has is a good sealing material. But, a little bit of Permatex ultra gray (or the Toyota red stuff you mentioned above) should seal it if you're worried.


I've never seen Dexcool turn into a jelly, but I have seen it develop crystals in cooling passages and heater cores.
Yes, some manufacturers want you to use their stuff (like Honda blue, or Toyota red), but in reality they all use the same base materials (kind of like oils), then manufacturers tailor them with different chemicals to meet their specs.
 

·
Registered
2018 Tundra Limited
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
It hasn’t lost any but is due for a flush. It’s been about 3yrs since the last one.
Then you'll need to get a jug or 2 and flush it. As for the temperature fitting, most of those are pipe thread style, so as you tighten it, it kind of locks itself in place. Most sensors are brass, which has is a good sealing material. But, a little bit of Permatex ultra gray (or the Toyota red stuff you mentioned above) should seal it if you're worried.


I've never seen Dexcool turn into a jelly, but I have seen it develop crystals in cooling passages and heater cores.
Yes, some manufacturers want you to use their stuff (like Honda blue, or Toyota red), but in reality they all use the same base materials (kind of like oils), then manufacturers tailor them with different chemicals to meet their specs.
Yea, got all the stuff for the car. She just needs to give me time with the car now. I rebuilt the engine in 06 for her and trying to get her to properly maintain it can be a challenge at times.
 

·
Registered
2018 Tundra Limited
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Got her car all flushed and refilled with fresh red. The switch was easy to swap and tested bad at 52ohms cold. Had a copper crush washer so I didn’t use any sealant. She was super happy when it started immediately instead of after 3-4 tries.
 

·
Registered
1997 Corolla
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
I've wondered how hard it is to start if the cold start switch or injector isn't working. It never gets super cold in Phoenix, so I can't test it. Mine does take a few seconds of cranking to first start whether it's 50F or 100F outside.
 

·
Registered
2018 Tundra Limited
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I've wondered how hard it is to start if the cold start switch or injector isn't working. It never gets super cold in Phoenix, so I can't test it. Mine does take a few seconds of cranking to first start whether it's 50F or 100F outside.
She said it had been taking longer to start over time. Tested it with the meter and definitely tested bad. Should have been between 20-40 ohms cold. Between 40-60 ohms if it’s warm. It started right up the first try after install and her face lit right up with a big smile.

I did read that the switch fails more than the CSI.
 

·
Registered
1992 Geo Prizm
Joined
·
1,248 Posts
I've wondered how hard it is to start if the cold start switch or injector isn't working. It never gets super cold in Phoenix, so I can't test it. Mine does take a few seconds of cranking to first start whether it's 50F or 100F outside.

I don't know, but my Geo Prizm starts very easy in warm weather (above 40*F). But in cold weather (below 20*F) it takes priming the fuel pump for it to start. It's like me, in that it doesn't like cold weather. :wink:
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top