Toyota Nation Forum banner

121 - 140 of 408 Posts

·
Highlander Hybrid Newbie
Joined
·
41 Posts
Thanks Cahhdriver. I was already thinking of going to the next size up. BTW, are you using the Assurance TripleTred (which I think is meant for regular passenger cars) or the Fortera TripleTred (which I think is meant for trucks and SUVs)? I assume you are using the Fortera, but just wanted to be sure. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Thanks Cahhdriver. I was already thinking of going to the next size up. BTW, are you using the Assurance TripleTred (which I think is meant for regular passenger cars) or the Fortera TripleTred (which I think is meant for trucks and SUVs)? I assume you are using the Fortera, but just wanted to be sure. Thanks!
We have the Fortera TripleTred, not the Assurance.

Nothing but truck or SUV tires will do because the car is so heavy. We also tow and drive on gravel road so good tires make things easier. Our HH came with Goodyear Integrity way back in 2005, a weak squishy van tire for a 2+ ton SUV!

We run ours at between 36 and 37 psi for that combination of handling and rolling freedom. Your new HH may require different pressure for best performance that you prefer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I am having the same problem with the OEM Toyo tires on my '08 Highlander Hybrid. Were your tires out of alignment? Were you able to get the tires replaced? Thanks.

-Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
This seems to be an issue with all these Toyo tires on the Highlander in the 19" size especially. :sosad::mad:

There is a whole stream of notes and comments over on the Edmunds Forum on these tires. http://townhall-talk.edmunds.com/direct/view/.f101cb2/1

I was more worried that I couldn't find good (Michelin X-Ice or Blizzak) 19" snow tires and wheels and it seems after looking at that forum there is little choice in replacements for any tire currently. Toyo also makes a HT which some are saying are working well, but until we get other manufactures making tires in this size we are stuck :thumbsdow
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Replacement Tires for a 2008 Highlander Hybrid

After 15k miles my tires on my 2008 Highlander are shot. The tires were not good at all. The problem I'm having is finding someone who has the correct size (245/55 19). Unfortunately, Toyo and Bridgestone are the only ones that carry tires in that size. The problem is the models they do carry are poor tires too. Has anyone put on a 255/55 19's instead, and if so have you had any problems? Any advice is welcomed. I don't want to buy new wheels.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
34,420 Posts
You ought to take a look at the 08+ Highlander forum and do a search of the threads there. There have been a number of threads there dealing with tires, including the 19". See you there....

TrailDust
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Just purchased a 2008 HiHY and had the same question about the tire pressure on-screen display. 4 out of 5 show 33 psi but the first in the list shows 38 psi. I'm hoping that's the spare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
98 Posts
33-34 is about right. 44 is the max for the load rating and would be absolutely incorrect. Handling would be terrible (not enough tire on the road) and the ride would be very stiff.

Just as a note...I have an 09 Hihy, now with 1200 miles on it.

Mine came from the dealer at 40psi. The door sticker does indicate 34 on mine. The max PSI on the tire sidewall (for maximum load) is 44 psi. Based on how low profile the tires are, and the rim width to tire size ratio, I was guessing that running at or near the max PSI would not have an adverse impact on the tire wear. The stock rims are perfectly sized for the stock tires. If rim width is off, or on tires that are less stiff and/or have taller sidewalls, changing inflation pressure can have dramatic results. Overinflating can cause the tires to 'balloon', resulting in the center of the tire wearing prematurely, and less tire on the ground (the edges of the tire being slightly removed from the road). Underinflation causes the opposite, with the sidewalls carrying more load, and the edges of the tires wearing faster (and the center not wearing as fast), and also potentially leading to sidewall failure.

I've done some tire pressure experimentation. Changing from 35-44 psi really doesn't have a significant impact on the handling of this vehicle; even at 33-35 psi, the low profile sidewalls ensure a rigid tire response. I've also chalked and marked the tires, to examine tire wear at different pressures. From what I've seen, the tread profile and wear patterns remain wholly unchanged going from 35 to 44 psi. To be clear: my testing suggests that there is NO CHANGE in contact pattern, and thus should be no change in tire wear. Also, at 44psi, the ride is still great.

I haven't had a chance to test fuel economy at different pressures yet. However, based on experience with previous vehicles, my review of the experiences of other hybrid owners, application of basic scientific principles and good clean common sense, higher pressure = lower rolling resistance = better mileage. So for now, I'm sticking at 44psi.

Oh--and as for the comment that 44 psi is absolutely incorrect--that's a bit misleading. 44psi may be correct, depending on vehicle load. The factory rating is the minimum pressure that you can run with the standard vehicle load. But tire manufacturers generate weight/pressure charts that show the pressure you should be running with any given load. So if you're carrying a heavy load or towing a trailer, in theory you should have more pressure in the tires. Within certain limits, the correlation between load and pressure is linear. For example, if a tire is rated for max load of 2000# at 40 PSI, in theory, if you're only carrying 1500# on that tire, you could likely run 30 PSI. Again--that is the theoretical correlation. The practical part of it is simple--Toyota recommends a certain pressure based on expected load, and a tradeoff between weight-carrying and comfort. With low profile tires, the comfort gained with a slightly lower pressure is minimal, if even perceptible. If you're carrying more weight, you need more pressure. If you're not carrying more weight, but want to reduce rolling resistance and improve fuel economy, you can do so, provided that tire profile is not adversely affected. In this case, I don't think tire wear will be adversely affected based on my study of this car, and I've decided to run more pressure...a decision which is not "absolutely incorrect".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
I've done some experimenting as well and found that 38PSI seems like a good psi. The ride is good and less harsh on teh road seams then it is at 40 or 44 psi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
<<Oh--and as for the comment that 44 psi is absolutely incorrect--that's a bit misleading. 44psi may be correct, depending on vehicle load.>>

Correct, it's dependent on vehicle load and for the highlander 44 would be incorrect unless you keep heavy construction equipment in the back :)

Running too high of a tire pressure will cause higher wear in the center of the tire...unless your load is higher than a typical load. There is a factory recommendation for a reason...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Goodyear Fuel Max tires

Looking for Low Rolling Resistance Tires. Goodyear has a new tire, Fuel Max. Has anyone purchased them? How good are they?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Just as a note...I have an 09 Hihy, now with 1200 miles on it...In this case, I don't think tire wear will be adversely affected based on my study of this car, and I've decided to run more pressure...a decision which is not "absolutely incorrect".
:thumbsup:

I'd just like to indicate that I also pretty much mirror your experiences -- I'm also ~ 1200 miles too! :)

fwiw, I run 40 psi all around to allow ~ +4 increase for when the tires heat up.

Laters!
Edgardo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
34,420 Posts
To each their own. BTW, the 44psi max pressure is for a cold tire...always adjust tire pressure when cold after sitting overnight.
Or on road trips that incur large changes in altitude. The rule of thumb for tire pressure is an increase/decrease of 0.5 PSI for every 1,000 feet of change in altitude. Also, there's a 2 PSI change for every 10 degrees Fahrenheit change in temperature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Highlander Hybrid 255 55 19's

I have had the same problem and am convinced that the 255 55 19's are the way to go. Bridgestone Dueler Alenza's get good reviews.

Discount Tire has an useful size calculator which indicates that they are about 4/10 of an inch wider and taller. http://www.discounttiredirect.com/direct/brochure/info/tmpInfoTireMath.jsp Makes about a 1 mph difference (higher) in highway speed so set the cruise 1 mph lower.

In response to my inquiry on another thread, confirmed that they run fine with the Highlander. He also recommended the Alenza. Looks like the way I am going.

Have you bought tires yet? If so, what is your experience?

Thanks,

Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
Tire Pressure sensors

Question, If I get a separate set of wheels, tires and sensors for winter driving do I have to go back to the dealer each fall and spring for them to put the new/different codes into the computer or if done once will it recognize the different sensors when on the vehicle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Question, If I get a separate set of wheels, tires and sensors for winter driving do I have to go back to the dealer each fall and spring for them to put the new/different codes into the computer or if done once will it recognize the different sensors when on the vehicle?
While I have not confirmed this myself there have been at least 3 folks in the non-hybrid forum that confirmed the codes have to be entered by the dealer each time. One person confirmed that there appear to be 9 slots to enter the codes for the tire pressure sensors but only the last 5 appear to be recognized so it looks like this feature is only half baked.

Disappointing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
You will have to go back each time, as long as the numbers are written down its easy, I think the Land Cruiser is the only Toyota that can store 2 sets of numbers
 
121 - 140 of 408 Posts
About this Discussion
407 Replies
149 Participants
ukrkoz
Toyota Nation Forum
ToyotaNation Forum is a community dedicated to all Toyota models. Come discuss the Camry, Tacoma, Highlander, 4Runner, Rav4 and more!
Full Forum Listing
Top